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Lyme Disease - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 15 November 2022

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Structural determination of the complement inhibitory domain of Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 provides insight into classical pathway complement evasion by Lyme disease spirochetes.

B. afzelii strain B. garinii strain IP90 PGau and BGD19 from B. garinii strain IP90 were investigated in this research. In this research, we investigated the behavior of BBK32 orthologues of Lyme-associated Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, identified as BAD16 from B. afzeli strain B. garinii strain B. garinii strain B. garini strain B. In all assays tested, including high-affinity binding to purified C1r protease and C1 complex, and potent inhibition of the classical complement pathway, B. afzelii BAD16-C-like activities, according to our results. BGD19-C, a natively manufactured BGD19-C, also bound C1 and C1r with low affinity but with minimal reduction in vitro complement inhibitory activity relative to BBK32-C or BAD16-C. Interestingly, unlike these proteins, natively produced BGD19 did not provide much shield against serum killing, although BGD19 did not exhibit significant immunity against serum killing. The B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex's structure-function studies presented here contribute to our understanding of how BBK32 recognizes and blocks C1r and increases C1r's activity, as well as providing new insight into the evasion mechanisms of Lyme-associated spirochetes of the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1007659


Design theory to better target public health priorities: An application to Lyme disease in France

Here, we mobilized the concept-knowledge design theory to identify cutting-edge, cross-sectoral, and cross-disciplinary research and design programs that address the challenges presented by tick-borne Lyme disease in France, which is on increasing importance in French public health and healthcare systems. U201d We created a CK diagram that illustrates innovative topics that could be used in research studies, expert interviews, analysis of current French research studies, and collaboration with CK experts to support the development of an iterative strategy against Lyme disease within the CK methodological framework. We used literature review, expert interviews, analysis of ongoing French research projects, and collaboration with CK experts to help develop an iterative strategy against Lyme disease in research projects. The CK theory is a promising framework to support public health professionals in designing programs for a variety of yet critical settings, where research and data collection are still not adequate to provide clear direction.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2022.980086


Healthcare claims-based Lyme disease case-finding algorithms in the United States: A systematic literature review.

Background and objective Lyme disease is the fifth most commonly reported nonifiable infectious disease in the United States, with approximately 35,000 cases reported in 2019 via public health surveillance. To determine the risk of LD diagnosis and treatment using healthcare claims data and the effectiveness of interventions for LD prevention and treatment, it is important to use well-performing LD case-finding algorithms. To determine LD algorithms used with U. S. healthcare claims data and their validation status, we performed a systematic literature review. Of these, seven studies used LD diagnosis codes and antibiotic dispensing data, four studies used LD diagnosis codes and antibiotic dispensing results, and four studies used serological test order codes in combination with LD diagnosis codes and antibiotic records, while the remaining four studies used LD diagnosis codes and antibiotic dispensing results. Only one of the studies that reported algorithm results: sensitivity 50% and positive predictive value 5%, but this was based on Lyme disease diagnosis code only.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0276299


A multimodal neuroimaging study of brain abnormalities and clinical correlates in post treatment Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne infectious disease in the United States. Post-treatment Lyme disease is a disease that affects 10-20 percent of patients in which symptoms persist despite antibiotic therapy. When doing functional MRI, this research gave a working memory task to a closely screened group of 12 patients with well-defined PTLD and 18 healthy controls. All 12 PTLD participants also received diffusion tensor imaging to determine white matter integrity. Patients with PTLD responded more slowly, but not more accurately than controls, on the working memory task. DTI results in the patients with PTLD revealed several frontal lobe regions in which greater axial diffusivity in the patients with PTLD coincided with longer duration of illness. Higher axial diffusivity may represent white matter repair and recovery over time, rather than pathology, and cognition appears to be fluidly affected throughout this repair process.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0271425


A multimodal neuroimaging study of brain abnormalities and clinical correlates in post treatment Lyme disease

Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne infectious disease in the United States. Post-treatment Lyme disease is a condition that affects ten percent of patients in which signs persist despite antibiotic therapy. When doing functional MRI, this research administered a working memory test to a carefully selected group of 12 patients with well-defined PTLD and 18 healthy controls. A subset of 12 controls and all 12 PTLD participants were also tested for white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging. Patients with PTLD responded more slowly, but not less accurately, than did controls, on the working memory task. Multiple frontal lobe regions in which increased axial diffusivity in the patients with PTLD coincided with longer illness durations were identified in the WHO's Whole-Brain DTI studies. Optical disruption: The appearance of cognition is largely affected throughout the recovery process, with increased axial diffusivity reflecting white matter repair and recovery over time rather than pathology.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/fbb5f278ff6b434e81f72a57ec81a45f


Testing Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic approach for Lyme disease patients

Borreliella burgdorferi sensu lato complex spirochetes of several genospecies of the Borreliella burgdorferi sensu lato complex, making it the most common tick-borne disease in the Northern hemisphere. By our earlier proof-of-concept study, Raman spectroscopy was investigated for its LD diagnostic use. Borreliella burgdorferi sensu stricto (B31) strains. The blood from mice that were infected with 297 and B31 strains of Borreliella burgdorferi sensu stricto was examined during the previous investigation. Two out of three major clades of B. burgdorferi s. isolates found in the United States, two of the three primary clades of B. burgdorferi s. isolates found in the United States were selected strains. Borreliella afzelii or Borreliella garinii, or B. burgdorferi N40, a strain of the third major class of B. burgdorferi s. in the United States, has been examined by the present study. Moreover, 90 human serum samples obtained from LD-confirmed, LD-negative, and LD-probable human patients were also tested by RS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2022.1006134


Evolution of the vls Antigenic Variability Locus of the Lyme Disease Pathogen and Development of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Conserved VlsE Epitopes

ABSTRACT VlsE is an outer surface protein of the Lyme disease pathogen responsible for its within-host replication and a common diagnostic biomarker of Lyme disease. Developed by evolutionary analysis, we first measured amino acid sequence variability encoded by the vls genes from 13 B. burgdorferi genomes. The IR4 and IR6 peptides became the most antigenic and reacted well with both the human and rabbit sera, although all IR peptides failed to react well with sera from natural hosts. IMPORTANCE Aspects of Lyme disease The presence of antibodies produced by the patient following infection by the bacterial pathogen, not the pathogen itself, is determined by laboratory methods. In addition, the indirect tests do not distinguish between active or past infections of the Lyme disease bacteria in a patient sample.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1128/spectrum.01743-22


Access to Care in Lyme Disease: Clinician Barriers to Providing Care

Patients with persistent Lyme disease/chronic Lyme disease have a difficult time finding medical attention. Although this health inequity has been investigated from the patient standpoint, clinicians' challenges in providing services to this group of patients have not been investigated. Clinicians providing care for patients with PLD/CLD have a wealth of clinical experience, but they are confronted with a variety of clinical, regulatory, and financial obstacles. Clinician-encountered barriers may be a significant disincentives for providing care patients with PLD/CLD, making it impossible to recruit and recruit physicians for the rapidly growing PLD/CLD populations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10101882


Direct Capture and Early Detection of Lyme Disease Spirochete in Skin with a Microneedle Patch

Lyme disease in animals and humans is caused by a family of spirochetes, according to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. The new standard laboratory testing of LD uses an indirect two-step serological assay that reveals host immune reactivity. The MN patch is quickly dissolvable in water or TE buffer, and the presence of spirochete DNA is confirmed by PCR. This simple direct PCR technique could be a transformative tool for early detection of Lyme disease and allow prompt intervention to patients if infection is early, and systemic spirochete numbers are low.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12100819


Assessing knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Canadian veterinarians with regard to Lyme disease in dogs

Abstract Background The blacklegged tick is a vector for Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease. In several provinces, the BLT expansion has been attributed to an elevated risk of Lyme disease. Veterinarians with Bb and Lyme disease can be different from veterinarians with different approaches, as shown by the 2018 American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus paper. Objectives: To determine current information, attitudes, and practices of Canadian veterinarians regarding Lyme disease in dogs, click here. Methods An online questionnaire was sent to Canadian veterinarians by veterinary associations and industries. In reported tick distribution and clinical approaches, regional variations were noted. The best and clinical Importance of Bb exposure and Lyme disease in dogs were found in a variety of ways used by responding Canadian veterinarians to combating Bb exposure and Lyme disease in dogs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1111/jvim.16022

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions