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Lyme Disease - Crossref

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Last Updated: 15 May 2022

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Generalizability in two clinical trials of Lyme disease

Abstract Objectives: The aim of this paper is to determine whether selection factors contributed to the unfavorable findings. This paper explores whether the research group was representative of the general chronic Lyme disease population. The authors' findings could have resulted from enrolling patients who were sick after an average of 4. 7 years and an average of three previous courses of care. The results have been extrapolated to other groups of Lyme disease patients by commentators, by a case discussant in a widely distributed medical journal, and by health insurance providers that refuse to prescribe antibiotic therapy. Applying the findings to target populations with characteristics that differ from those included in these studies is unnecessary and could restrict the choices for chronic Lyme disease patients who may benefit from antibiotic therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-5573-3-12


Lyme disease politics and evidence‑based policy making in the UK

This case report looks at my involvement in UK Lyme patient activism and policy change with a narrow topic. It's a tale about how I collaborated with others with statistical abilities - using science and evidence to challenge policy successfully. It shows how networks of communities can participate in social change to make it more socially relevant and responsive, as well as more scientifically robust.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1332/policypress/9781447348214.003.0025


Predisposing factors for individuals' Lyme disease prevention practices: Connecticut, Maine, and Montana.

RESULTS: Perception practices were strongly correlated with the increased risk of Lyme disease, knowing someone with Lyme disease, knowing Lyme disease, and recognizing Lyme disease as a common problem. The personal risk, knowing someone with Lyme disease, as well as knowledge of Lyme disease, as well as social learning theories are consistent with social learning theories.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.87.12.2035


Environmental risk factors for Lyme disease identified with geographic information systems.

To identify and identify household risk factors for Lyme disease, a geographical information system was used to determine and determine residential environmental risk factors for Lyme disease. For 53 environmental variables at the homes of Lyme disease case patients in Baltimore County from 1989 to 1990, as well as data for randomly selected addresses. The risk of Lyme disease in 1991 increased with risk categories derived from the 1989 to 1990 estimates. Risk factors of zoonotic disease in large areas can be quickly identified using a geographic information system and epidemiological techniques.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.85.7.944


Dogs as sentinels for Lyme disease in Massachusetts.

In order to determine whether dogs can be sentinels for Lyme disease, an investigation was conducted into the connection of incident human cases of Lyme disease and seroprevalence of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in dogs. B. burgdorferi is an antibody-rich dog serum samples were analyzed by ELISA for antibody to B. burgdorferi. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health compiled a database of incident human cases of Lyme disease. Canine seroprevalence was highly predictive of incidence from July 1988 to 1989, according to regression analyses of the relationship between the log10 and canine seroprevalence from July 1988-August 1989. B. burgdorferi is a virus that causes antibody synthesis in dog populations, providing a sensitive, accurate, and simple way to assess the potential danger to people of B. burgdorferi in the environment. Canine seropositivity risk factors may directly or indirectly address certain aspects of human Lyme disease epidemiology.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.81.11.1448


Lyme disease: a proposed ecological index to assess areas of risk in the northeastern United States.

METHODS: Twenty-two school buildings and recreational areas within a Lyme disease endemic area of central Monmouth County, New Jersey, were screened for transmission using an ecological survey that looked at human populations and the abundance of infected adult ticks. Only four locations conducted on-site tick surveys, which found infected I. dammini adults at only four locations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.81.6.714


Potential for exposure to tick bites in recreational parks in a Lyme disease endemic area.

An I. dammini encounter distance, measured as the distance traveled before encountering a nymphal or adult I. dammini on a drag cloth, ranged from 36 meters in high-risk parks to infinity. According to our sampling technique, two of the three parks with the highest annual attendance also had the highest I. dammini population indices as predicted. These results show that recreational parks in Lyme disease endemic areas pose a significant human risk of tick bites and Lyme disease in humans.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.79.1.12


The distribution of canine exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi in a Lyme-Disease endemic area.

In Westchester, New York, the causative agent of human Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, was tested to determine the prevalence of Lyme disease in a geographic area endemic for Lyme disease. A total of 1446 blood samples were taken from resident dogs and tested by a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. B burgdorferi exposure in Canine increases in a south-to-node gradient within the county. Human risk of getting Lyme disease in Westchester County is inversely linked to the degree of urbanization, according to the close association of dogs and humans.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.83.9.1305


Diversity of tick species biting humans in an emerging area for Lyme disease.

Although most tick bites in humans in areas of the northeastern United States in which Lyme disease is highly endemic are caused by Ixodes dammini, no research shows how often I. dammini bites in low-preval or emerging areas for Lyme disease. The number of tick bites in humans that are due to I. dammini is unknown in a region may have ramifications for public health policy and clinical management. All ticks that had been removed from human beings were identified, and reports were gathered that included bite seasonality, location, and demographics of tick bite victims. In Maine, the likelihood of a tick bite due to I. dammini was lower than in areas in the northeastern United States, where Lyme disease is highly endemic. Regional tick bite surveys may be useful in determining the likelihood of Lyme disease following a tick bite.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.82.1.66


Canine seroprevalence and the distribution of Ixodes dammini in an area of emerging Lyme disease.

Comparing canine seroprevalence to mosquito infection in an area of emerging Lyme disease shows how the distribution of canine seroprevalence compares to that of vector ticks in this research. During the heartworm-testing months of April and May 1989, 16 veterinary clinics throughout Maine's State of Maine developed 828 canine sera, assaying for anti-Borrelia antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparison of I. dammini submissions with those of another commonly found tick, Ixodes cookei, reinforced this predominantly coastal distribution.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.81.10.1331

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions