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Lyme Disease - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 15 May 2022

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Searching for Persistence of Infection in Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is the most common vector borne disease in the United States. Although antibiotic therapy is clinically safe in treating Lyme disease in most patients early in the disease course, a significant number of patients who get therapy experience persistent symptoms. There is a lot of mystery surrounding persistent symptoms after antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. The current available tests for human Lyme disease do not allow for the identification of persistent infection following antibiotic therapy. In this article, up to 120 subjects with various stages of Lyme disease will be tested as controls in up to 120 patients with Xenodiagnosis for determining persistence of B. burgdorferi in treated human Lyme disease. In Objective #1, subjects that have the characteristic erythema migrant rash and have been treated with antibiotics early in the course of Lyme disease will be tested. B. burgdorferi will be found and tested for B. burgdorferi. Patients with persistent symptoms following antibiotic therapy will be monitored in Objective #3. Patients with Xenodiagnosis in humans, patients with EM who are in the first two days of antibiotic therapy, and patients with untreated Lyme arthritis will all be evaluated as an effort to increase the chances of a positive xenodiagnosis in humans, patients with EM who are in the first two days of antibiotic therapy and patients with untreated Lyme arthritis. Evidence that B. burgdorferi can be recovered by xenodiagnosis in patients with persistent symptoms would change the current disease model and give researchers and clinicians a tool for identifying patients with persistent infection.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01143558


Evaluation, Treatment, and Follow-up of Patients With Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a multisystem disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, and it is the most common vector-borne disease. These research sub-projects have concentrated on investigating Borrelia virus genetics, diagnosis of clinical course and outcomes of patients with Lyme disease, and the immune response to B. burgdorferi infection.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00028080


Xenodiagnosis After Antibiotic Treatment for Lyme Disease - Phase II Study

Although antibiotic therapy is clinically effective in treating Lyme disease in most patients early in the course of disease, a large number of patients on therapy experience persistent symptoms, according to a large number of patients receiving therapy. Chronic symptoms following antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease are a point of skepticism. We conducted the first study to find out how I. scapularis larvae can be used for B. burgdorferi infection in humans. xenodiagnosis for B. burgdorferi was positive in 2 participants and indeterminate in two participants in this small pilot study. Our goals include determining the relationship between detection of B. burgdorferi by xenodiagnosis and persistence of symptoms in patients with Lyme disease within one year, post-therapy; quantifying subject characteristics related to the likelihood of finding B. burgdorferi by xenodiagnosis by xenodiagnosis include: time from infection, time between infection and therapy, time from therapy; and continue to assess the effectiveness of xenodiagnosis in humans; Although xenodiagnosis is unlikely to be widely used in clinical practice due to the labor intensity and speed of testing, if our analysis shows a correlation between positive xenodiagnostic testing and the persistence of symptoms after B. burgdorferi infection, it may be a useful tool for testing new strategies for diagnosis and correlation with more broadly applicable diagnostic metrics.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02446626


A Comprehensive Clinical, Microbiological and Immunological Assessment of Patients With Suspected Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome and Selected Control Populations

Lyme disease has risen to become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States, according to the author. This research is designed to collect and monitor a large population of patients with post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome and related conditions, which will result in a prospective database on which stringent diagnostic criteria can be established and future therapeutic trials can be conducted.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00001539


Diagnosis of Disseminated Lyme Borreliosis by Targeted Proteomics

Lyme borreliosis is a multisystemic bacterial disease affecting the skin, joint, and nervous system. The investigators have found several protein signs of active infection in the skin by using discovery proteomics, which enabled us to create a new targeted proteomics assay. The invcestigators tested the same methods in skin biopsies of humans presenting with an erythema migrant. The bulk of the bacterial proteins that had been previously identified in infected mice's skin were also present in human lesional skin biopsies. The diagnosis of disseminated Lyme borreliosis is now primarily based on evocative medical signs and a positive Borrelia serology. We first created a mouse model of late infection in mice and later identified several bacterial proteins as signs of ongoing infection in the murine skin. The investigators now want to determine whether the skin also acts as a reservoir for these bacteria during persistent disseminated infections in humans, as well as detecting bacterial proteins in this readily available tissue by the same method. Since tick bites most commonly occurs in the lower portion of the body, the upper part of the thigh will be the site of topical steroids application and skin biopsy. The proteomics yield will be similar to the two main other direct detection methods, i. e.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04719962

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions