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Lead Poisoning - Crossref

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Last Updated: 16 January 2022

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Interpreting and Managing Blood Lead Levels of Less Than 10 μg/dL in Children and Reducing Childhood Exposure to Lead: Recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

Concurrently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that a blood lead level of 10 g/dL did not establish a threshold for lead poisoning. In this study, we offer data to help clinicians identify blood lead levels ten g/dL, establish knowledge of lead levels in this range, and outline steps to minimize childhood exposures to lead. To assist in the interpretation of blood lead results, clinicians should know the blood lead concentration range for blood lead values and, if possible, choose a laboratory that has routine results within 2 g/dL. Pediatricians at risk for lead exposure, as well as more frequent rescreening of children with blood lead levels approaching 10 g/dL should be considered by clinicians as circumstances dictate.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-1770


Environmental lead poisoning among children in Porto Alegre state, Southern Brazil

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of lead poisoning in children and to determine the causal causes, as well as potential local sources of contamination. METHODS: A cross-sectional prevalence survey was conducted in 2006 with a random sample of 97 children aged zero to five years from a neighborhood in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, a suburb. ANOVA was conducted with a Brown-Forsythe adjustment for heteroscedasticity and with Dunnett's T3 method for multiple comparisons of unequal variances to determine lead concentrations from the various collection sites for each type of sample data. RESULTS: In 16. 5% of children, blood lead levels > 10. 0 g/dL was detected. In soil, high lead levels were discovered, and there was no evidence of lead pollution. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of lead poisoning was reported, and the potential sources of contamination in this area appear to waste recylcing activities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1590/s0034-89102012000200004


Determination of the Toxic Dose of Experimental Lead Poisoning for Male Goats in Fallujah City, Iraq

This study was designed to test lead poisoning experimentally in male goats to determine the toxic dose and investigate it's effects on hematological parameters, liver and kidney functions. neutrophils 39. 07 %, monocytes 1. 88% 0. 85 percent, and eosinophils 4. 25%, respectively. ALT 59. 90. 0u/l, AST 243. 13u/l, and renal frailer 1. 96 mg/dl respectively, indicate significant rises in liver enzyme activity; ALT 59. 90. 20u/l; AST 243:1. 3 million/l In summary, this is the first study that established lead poisoning in male goats in Iraq and estimates their poor findings on goats' hematological and chemobiological testing.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.37940/ajvs.2021.14.2.7


Lead Poisoning in Cattle Held in a Military Training area

Background: Lead poisoning is one of the most common dietary diseases in cattle. Clinical findings are generally neurological and necropsy findings, and histopathological changes may vary according to the clinical setting. This paper discusses the epidemiological, cellular, and anatomopathological characteristics of a lead poisoning epidemic in cattle raised in a military artillery training camp. Case: Sixteen cattle were killed out of a herd of sixty 4-6 years-old mixed breed castrated males. In addition, there was evidence of renal tubular epithelium degeneration and necrosis in one bovine, as well as in renal epithelial cells in one bovine; these inclusion bodies were identified using both modified Ziehl-Neelsen and periodic acid Schiff stains; in addition, there were astrocytic degeneration and neuronophagia; and in one bovine, intranuclear inclusion bodies; in one bovine, there were intranuclear For one of the necropsied cattle, the lead levels in the kidneys and livers were respectively 51. 7 g/g and 41. 00 g/g, while the other was 39. 0 g/g. In the current research, lead poisoning in cattle was determined in the kidney and liver, according to epidemiological, genetic, anatomopathological, and liver testing. In such instances, cattle may ingest lead directly from the soil or through contaminated pastures with lead dust on the surface of the leaves. paraphrasephalopathy, rabies, hepatic encephalopathy, and several other causes of polioencephalopathy in cattle should be distinguished from other medical disorders, particularly rabies, hepatic encephalopathy, and several causes of polioencephalopathy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.22456/1679-9216.85149

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions