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Inpatient Care - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 11 May 2022

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Encountering patients with anorexia nervosa - An emotional roller coaster. nurses’ lived experiences of encounters in psychiatric inpatient care

Objectia Therapeutic Inpatient Care The purpose of this study was to clarify the meaning of nurses' lived experiences of encounters with adult patients with anorexia nervosa in psychiatric inpatient care. With 11 nurses with experience of treating patients with anorexia nervosa in psychiatric inpatient care, personal interviews with a narrative strategy were conducted using a narrative approach. All nurse-patient encounters need to strike a balance between one's career, seeing the individual behind the patient, and the disease.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1080/17482631.2022.2069651


Increasing person-centeredness in psychosis inpatient care: staff experiences from the Person-Centered Psychosis Care (PCPC) project

Abstract Background: Human factors are required to raise person-centeredness in hospital care for patients with psychotic disorders. Patients with schizophrenia and similar psychoses were treated by a multidisciplinary educational program for hospital workers at four wards to increase person-centeredness in the care of patients with schizophrenia and similar psychoses. Staff's perceptions of person-centered care and the process of increasing person-centeredness were covered in semi-structured interviews. Results Staff regarded person-centered care as a process rather than a method. They discussed key elements of person-centered care, such as recognizing the patient as a competent individual who can participate in her/his care. Participants in both thinking and action demonstrated a solid grasp of the main concepts of person-centered care during their implementation. According to studies, person-centered care is feasible in the psychosis inpatient setting and could improve quality of care. Registration of a trial is open The trial is the results of a larger study evaluating the intervention Person-Centered Psychosis Care intervention.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-022-08008-z


THE PREVALENCE OF KIDNEY FAILURE DUE TO URINARY CALCULI IN THE UROLOGY INPATIENT CARE DR. SOETOMO HOSPITAL FROM JANUARY 2016 TO DECEMBER 2017

In the Urology Inpatient Care Soetomo General Hospital, from January 2016 to December 2017, we want to know the profile of patients with kidney failure as a result of urinary calculi. Material & Methods: A prospective descriptive review was conducted among 35 patients with kidney disease due to urinary tract stones in 35 people. The sex ratio known from the survey between men and women was 60%: 40%. The most common causes of renal impairment were chronic Kidney Disease, followed by Acute Kidney Injury, and Acute Chronic Kidney Disease. Conclusion: Chronic Kidney Disease was the most common cause of renal dysfunction in the study, relative to other disorders such as Acute Kidney Injury and Acute Chronic Kidney Disease. Men are more likely to experience kidney disease as a result of urinary calculi.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.32421/juri.v29i2.558


Patient involvement in improving the evidence base on mental health inpatient care: the PERCEIVE programme

Background: Despite the shift to care in the community, only 40% of the NHS budget on mental health services is attributed to inpatient services. However, service user groups had concerns about the poor quality of these services in mental health long before the Francis Report highlighted serious inpatient care inpatient care. Objectives: To find out how changes to inpatient care influence the perceptions of the ward by service users and workers by using stakeholder participatory strategies. Lasting Changes for Acute Inpatient SEttings : using participatory technologies, we produced two new scales [Views On Therapeutic Environment for Workers and Views On Inpatient CarE for service users]. Inpatient – Inpatient – the patient services Receipt Inventory – Inpatient – Working with nurses and service users, we created a health-economic report to determine the number of contact service users with staff. Delivering Opportunities for Recovery: A stepped-wedge randomised controlled trial to see if teaching ward nurses to conduct therapeutic group activities would raise the ward's image among service users and workers. The first was a ‘triage' scheme in which service users were admitted to the triage ward and then either transferred to their locality wards or discharged back into the community within seven days. Service user and employee perceptions of the ward were important in the DOORWAYS and BETTER project, as well as CITRINE, the health economic indicator.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3310/pgfar06070


Pattern of inpatient care for depression: an analysis of 232,289 admissions

Abstract Background: The prevalence of major depressive disorder in women is up to 50% higher than that of men. However, little is known about discrepancies in health care use between depressed female and male patients. The results revealed that MDD prevalence was at a significantly higher rate in women than in 232,289 admissions. In all depression subtypes, the length of hospital stay for women was significantly longer. Conclusions Elevated rates of inpatient care in women cannot be attributed solely to a rise in MDD prevalence and are dependent on gender and type of depressive episode.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-020-02781-z


Constructing episodes of inpatient care: data infrastructure for population-based research

Abstract Background Databases used to analyze patient care in hospitals and Intensive Care Units usually have a separate entry for each segment of hospital or ICU care. However, it is not unprecedented for patients to be moved between hospitals and/or ICUs, and when transfers occur, it is often impossible to reconstruct the complete episodes of hospital and ICU care. Methods This report used a medical ICU database and administrative hospital abstracts for Manitoba's adult population from 2000–2008. We compared five methods for detecting patient transfers and establishing hospital episodes, as well as the ICU episodes embedded within. Methods 2–5 produced remarkably similar results, with transfers included in about 25% of ICU-containing hospital episodes and 10% of ICU episodes. In addition, we found that these methods for creating episodes of hospital and ICU care can be implemented in a large, complex dataset.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2288-12-133


Impact of hospitalists on the efficiency of inpatient care and patient satisfaction: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Background: Hospitalists have in the last 20 years accounted for a significant percentage of hospitalized patients' healthcare in the United States. In comparison, other studies showed increased cost and resources utilization associated with hospitalist-run healthcare services. Aim: We wanted to publish class 1 results on the effectiveness of healthcare and patient satisfaction using hospitalist-run care systems. Methods: To find all relevant studies, four electronic medical journals were accessed by four electronic medical databases. In terms of LOS, the overall effect size favoured hospitalist-run care models in terms of LOS. Patient satisfaction was similar or even higher in hospitalist compared to non-hospitalist services, but there was no significant difference in terms of hospital cost, but patient satisfaction was similar or even better in hospitalist compared to non-hospitalist services. Conclusion: Compared to NH, hospitalist care has decreased LOS and increased patient satisfaction. This indicates an increase in the effectiveness of care that does not come at the expense of care quality.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1080/20009666.2019.1591901


Do hospitalist physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery? A systematic review of process, efficiency and outcome measures

This systematic review summarizes the results from 65 comparative studies to determine whether hospitalists deliver a higher quality of inpatient care relative to traditional inpatient physicians who maintain hospital privileges with concurrent outpatient activities. The majority of reviewed papers found that hospitalists are cost-effective providers of inpatient care based on decreases in their patients' average length of stay and total hospital expenditures; however, hospitalist care quality seems to be comparable to that provided by their colleagues. Conclusions: Future studies should include an increased emphasis on the specific characteristics of care that distinguish hospitalists from other inpatient clinic groups, as well as the development of more sophisticated conceptual and statistical tools that identify and quantify underlying causes driving provider-outcome associations in quality.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-9-58


Feeling safe or unsafe in psychiatric inpatient care, a hospital-based qualitative interview study with inpatients in Sweden

Abstract Background The aim of psychiatric inpatient care is to create an environment that encourages patient recovery, patient safety, and a positive working environment for employees. More details on patient experiences of feeling safe are required as a result of guidelines and programs addressing the importance of primary prevention in creating safe environments. Methods Four patients, five women, and 12 men were interviewed with 17 adult patients, five women, and 12 men from four clinics, one general psychiatric, one psychiatric, and two forensic psychiatric clinics were all included in this qualitative report. Patients' experiences of being safe or unsafe were the key issue in the interview guide's main issue. Staff provide patients with general information about the health condition on the ward without breaching individual patient rights to confidentiality, and there is an ongoing process that seeks to establish organizational values that promote healthy environments for patients and employees.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13033-019-0282-y


The inequality of inpatient care net benefit under integration of urban-rural medical insurance systems in China

Abstract Background: China has recently started attempts to integrate urban and rural basic medical insurance systems in order to ensure that both urban and rural enrollees have unified benefits. In China's consolidation of urban-rural medical insurance markets, the aim of this research was to identify causes of and differences in net inpatient care benefits. Individuals received greater inpatient care services when urban and rural social healthcare services were integrated, according to the Results. The wealthy were found to profit disproportionately from inpatient care, and the CI of integrated insurance enrollees was the lowest among all three common health insurance plans. Conclusion In China, increasing the integration of urban and rural medical insurance schemes is a cost-effective way to improve equity of income in urban and rural areas. Strategies aimed at lowering inpatient benefit inequalities must address socioeconomic causes that influence healthcare decisions.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12939-018-0891-0

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions