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Inpatient Care - Crossref

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Last Updated: 11 May 2022

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Inpatient Hospital Care of Children With Trisomy 13 and Trisomy 18 in the United States

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Trisomy 13 and Trisomy 18 are generally considered fatal anomalies, with the majority of infants dying within the first year after birth. The inpatient hospitalization that these patients receive has not been adequately explained. This report characterized inpatient hospitalizations of children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in the United States, including the number and types of surgical procedures performed. METHODS: Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of hospitalization data from the nationally representative U. S. Kids' Inpatient Database for the years 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. Patients aged 0 to 20 years with a diagnosis of trisomy 13 or trisomy 18. RESULTS: The number of hospitalizations for each trisomy group ranging from 846 to 907 per year for trisomy 13 and 1036, to 1616 per year for trisomy 18. CONCLUSIONS: Children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 receive significant hospital care in hospital.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-2139


An analysis of the costs of ambulatory and inpatient care.

The cost of their stay was estimated for patients admitted to Mount Sinai for cataract extraction in the first six months of 1980. This cost was then compared to five simulations of home care expenses. The results of the comparison of hospital expenses to home costs showed that home care is less costly than hospital care either if fewer services are provided to home patients or if the cost of certain services assumed by relatives is not determined.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.76.9.1102


Changes in alcohol-related inpatient care in Stockholm County in relation to socioeconomic status during a period of decline in alcohol consumption.

Alcohol sales in Stockholm County dropped by 18% from 1976 to 1981, according to 18. The socioeconomic status of inpatients treated for alcohol psychosis, alcoholism, alcohol intoxication, liver cirrhosis, and pancreatitis was investigated by comparing results from the National Housing and Population Censuses in 1975 and 1980, as well as pancreatitis reports from 1976 and 1981. Both rates were higher for those outside of the job market and lowest among white collar staff in both years. Overall inpatient hospitalization for alcohol-related diagnoses generally decreased, but the gulf between blue collar staff and white collar staff widened.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.79.1.52


The quality of care is related to death rates: hospital inpatient management of infants with acute gastroenteritis in Jamaica.

The quality of care of random samples of about 40 infants admitted with acute gastroenteritis to each of five hospitals in Jamaica was determined. Low rates of adherence to consensus care guidelines X100; poor adherence; intermediate adherence, SSMR 95; high rates of hospital-specific severity standardized mortality ratios; poor adherence, SSMR 127-230; poor adherence, SSMR 127-230; intermediate adherence, SSMR 14; good adherence, SSMR 14.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.78.2.149


Inpatient mortality and healthcare resource utilization of nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage complications in the US

Sincerely research into practical consequences of ICH evacuation have been published, only limited research has been done to quantify the incidence of subsequent complications and their healthcare economic impact. METHODS The IBM MarketScan Research databases were used to retrospectively identify patients with ICH from 2010 to 2015. The inpatient mortality rates for each complication of ICH ranged from highest to lowest for each complication of ICH were from highest to lowest for each complication of ICH, including hemocephalus, cerebral edema, pneumonia, seizure, and UTI. Hydrocephalus had the highest total cost at 7 days post-ICH diagnosis and the highest total cost at 1 year post-ICH diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS This study details one of the country's largest cohorts of patients with nontraumatic ICH. During initial admission, more than 42% of the patients with ICH had problems, resulting in increased inpatient mortality and significant HCRU.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.8.jns201839


Racial/ethnic differences in inpatient mortality and use of institutional postacute care following subarachnoid hemorrhage

Object This study was designed to determine racial/ethnic differences in hospital mortality rates and the use of institutional postacute care in the United States following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods An cross-sectional analysis of hospital discharges for SAH was conducted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2005 to 2010. According to the adjusted report, API patients were at a higher risk of death than white patients, and Hispanic patients were at a lower risk of death. Black patients were more likely to be discharged to hospitalization than white patients, compared to white patients, but were similar to white patients in terms of mortality risk. Conclusions Affective Patients with SAH in the United States have significant racial/ethnic variations in the risk of inpatient mortality and transfer to institutional care. Outcome is expected to be poor among API patients and the best among Hispanic patients compared to other groups.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2013.7.jns13544


Treatment biases in traumatic neurosurgical care: a retrospective study of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1998 to 2009

OBJECT The objective of this review was to determine the association between insurance status and the likelihood of receiving a neurosurgical intervention after admission to either extraaxial intracranial hemorrhage or spinal vertebral fracture. ResultRES: Resultant Lashes are found between 1998 and 2009. A total of 477,110 patients with spinal vertebral fracture were found. Patients with insured patients had a reduced risk of receiving a craniotomy and spinal fusion relative to insured patients, according to a multivariate review that controlled for patient demographics, severity of injuries, morbidities, hospital volume, and hospital characteristics. In cases of extraaxial intracranial hematoma, uninsured patients had an elevated risk-adjusted mortality risk relative to insured patients. Mortality rates in patients with spinal injury were similar among patients with and without insurance. According to this report, uninsured patients were significantly less likely to receive a craniotomy or spinal fusion for acute intracranial extravascular hemorrhage and spinal vertebral fracture.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.3.jns131356


Interfacility neurosurgical transfers: an analysis of nontraumatic inpatient and emergency department transfers with implications for improvements in care

Interfacility neurosurgical transfers to tertiary care centers are fueled by a variety of variables, including: a lack of on-site coverage, limited available technologies, insurance factors, and patient choice. Over 12 months, METHODS adult neurosurgical patients who were transferred to a single tertiary care center were analyzed by a multi-month study. Patients transferred from inpatient units had higher rates of surgical intervention, while hospitalized patients transferred from the ED had higher rates of urgent surgery and shorter mean time to surgery. Patients undergoing elective admission or admission from the authors' own ED had significantly shorter stays and ICU days than transferred patients, as well as a significantly lower total cost, across the same time period. CONCLUSIONS The authors' 12-month experience from a single tertiary care center without a Level I trauma certificate. Patients in this cohort required surgery, but the rates were higher among inpatient referrals, and misdiagnosis rates were higher among ED transfers. These results show that admitting nonemergency patients to local hospitals could improve diagnostic accuracy of patients in need of urgent care, more accurately identify patients in need of transfer, and reduce costs. Referring facilities may lack the necessary equipment or expertise, and the Emergency Medical Care and Active Labor Act mandates tertiary care centers to treat these patients under those circumstances. Telemedicine and electronic medical records integration may be able to encourage referring hospitals to pursue additional research, which may eliminate the need for unnecessary transfer and save additional cost savings.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.3.jns173224


Super-Utilizers of Inpatient Care in an Obstetrical Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

Objects The aim of the investigation was to determine hospital charges and length of stay for pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum, as well as identify the outliers who use a substantial portion of health care resources. Study Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 500 participants at a tertiary center between 2012 and 2014. Subjects were included inpatient status and an ICD-9 code for pregnancy, but those with an ICD-9 code for ectopic pregnancy were refused; those with an ICD-9 code were excluded. Preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes were the most typical issues in SUs, according to the most typical problems. Chronic hypertension was the most common pre-existing condition in SUs. SUs may have clustered at hospitals with higher demands of care, and this issue warrants further investigation using state and national level data.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1055/a-1788-6083


Suicide and death by other causes among patients with a severe mental illness: cohort study comparing risks among patients discharged from inpatient care v . those treated in the community

Since being released from inpatient psychiatric care, many patients suffer an acute phase of their illness, we wanted to know the additional danger among people with SMI after discharge from inpatient psychiatric care. In the year after their release, the risk of death among individuals with SMI who had not received inpatient psychiatric care recently was higher than among those with SMI who had not received inpatient psychiatric care recently. Conclusions are provided with an additional risk of death by suicide and natural causes for people with SMI who have recently been released from hospital inpatient care over and above the average risk among patients with the same diagnosis who have not been treated as an inpatient.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1017/s2045796022000075

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions