Advanced searches left 3/3

Inguinal Hernia Repair - Springer Nature

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 11 August 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Kingsnorth's modified score as predictor of complications in open inguinal hernia repair

Purpose The aim of this research is to investigate the postoperative complications surrounding unilateral primary inguinal hernia repair and establish their link with Kingsnorth's preoperatively modified scoring system. Methods of study design In a University Hospital, the patient underwent surgery for unilateral inguinal hernia. Conclusions The study included 403 patients who met the inclusion criteria from which 62 patients developed postoperative complications. a KN score of 5 u20138 and the involvement of a member of the abdominal wall surgery unit in the procedure revealed a statistically significant relationship with complications. Conclusions The KN classification can identify surgical wound problems in patients undergoing a primary unilateral inguinal hernia surgery. The chances of postoperative complications decrease when abdominal wall surgery is performed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13304-022-01341-2


Laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair under local anesthesia by topical lidocaine injection

Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients with inguinal hernia surgery in GA or LA in a single center from December 2016 to May 2018. The LA group's operating time and length of hospital stay were shorter than the GA group's. Between the LA group and the GA group, there were no significant differences in postoperative VAS, postoperative adverse effects, and postoperative complications. Conclusion compared to GA, there were no differences in postoperative pain and complications among patients who underwent TEP hernia repair under LA, according to the author.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-022-02653-3


Increasing volume but declining resident autonomy in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: an inverse relationship

Introduction Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has emerged as a viable option for treating both initial and recurrent inguinal hernia. Residents investigated resident autonomy within LIHR and open inguinal hernia repair across the Veterans Affairs system. Methods Utilizing the VA Medical Quality Improvement Service's website, we investigated inguinal hernia repairs based on the principal procedure code at all teaching VA hospitals from July 2004 to September 2019. Attending primary surgeon; attending scrubbed; resident primary and resident primary with attending supervising but not scrubbed; and primary surgeon with attending supervising but not scrubbed; and resident primary with attending scrubbed; attending primary surgeon coding at the time of surgery. Conclusions LIHR at VA hospitals has tripled in the last 15 years, with one-third of all inguinal hernia repairs affecting the majority being initial hernias; the majority are primary hernias.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-022-09476-4


Transinguinal preperitoneal (TIPP) vs endoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) procedure in unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a randomized controlled trial

Purpose of the Lichtenstein hernioplasty has long been thought to be the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair. Several studies reported positive results of the TIPP and TEP compared to the Lichtenstein hernioplasty; however, no study was published on the results when comparing the TIPP and TEP procedures. This report was designed to measure success following the TIPP vs. the TEP method for inguinal hernia repair. A total of 300 patients with unilateral inguinal hernia were registered and randomized to the TIPP- or TEP method. When compared to the TIPP method, we found significantly less postoperative chronic groin pain, chronic exhaustion, wound hypoesthesia, and wound infections after the TEP compared to a TIPP regimen. Conclusion We concluded that the TEP has a favorable result compared to the TIPP procedure, which has less postoperative pain and wound complications, while surgery rates and reoperations were similar in both groups.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-022-02651-5


Recurrence and complications after sliding inguinal hernia repair

Purpose Sliding hernia is a rare find, and it is also a bit uncertain if a laparoscopic or an open technique is preferred for repair of sliding hernias. The aim of this research was to determine the likelihood of post-operative complications and risk of reoperation in patients with sliding hernia based on surgical technique. Methods The study included male patients who underwent hernia repair between 1 January 2010 and December 2017. Patients treated with a Lichenstein repair had a greater risk of minor complications than a laparoscopic repair, but the risk was not significant. Overall, 1% had surgical repair of recurrence, with a greater risk among patients with sliding hernia, especially those undergoing a Lichenstein repair. Patients with sliding hernia were less likely in patients undergoing hernia repair using laparoscopic surgery, although in both groups the risk was low.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-022-02633-7


Use of local anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair has decreased over time in the VA system

Purpose: Inguinal hernia repair, randomized trials in 2003 revealed potentially enhanced outcomes when local rather than general anesthesia is used for inguinal hernia repair. After the release of the trials' level 1 results, we wanted to see how the use of local anesthesia for this procedure changed over time. Methods We used the 1998-2012 Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to identify adults who underwent open, unilateral inguinal hernia repair under local or general anesthesia, whether local or general anesthesia. Veteran veterans receiving local anesthesia remained stable at 64 years old as a result of time. Overall, we found that the use of local anesthesia decreased by around 1. 5% per year. Conclusion of the study shows that local anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in the VA has gradually decreased over the last 20+ years, despite evidence indicating equivalence or superiority to general anesthesia. Future research will investigate barriers to the use of local anesthesia for hernia repair.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-021-02532-3


Limited use of local anesthesia for open inguinal hernia repair: a qualitative study

Guidelines state that local anesthesia for open inguinal hernia repair is recommended by guidelines, but in clinical practice in several countries, it is rarely used. This paper explored physician's decision in selecting the correct anesthesia and barriers for implementing local anesthesia for open hernia repair in clinical practice. Participants described a standardized anesthesia care system for general anesthesia, using intravenous propofol/remifentanil and a laryngeal mask, and were generally happy with this arrangement. Participants considered intraoperative pain and quality of surgical technique, collaboration and education, logistics, and clinical practices as key factors in selecting anesthesia for open inguinal hernia repair, and these factors were considered by participants in determining anesthesia for open inguinal hernia repair in Danish public hospitals. With evidence proving specific types of local anesthesia with general anesthesia, such as propofol/remifentanil and a laryngeal mask, the potential workload in such a venture should be justified.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-021-02540-3


Mesh fixation techniques for inguinal hernia repair: an overview of systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials

Purpose Inguinal hernia repair using surgical mesh is a common surgical procedure. We reviewed a collection of published systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials to determine the risk of persistent pain and recurrence after open and laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs using various mesh fixation techniques. The risk of continuing pain after open mesh repair was lower in comparison to suture and suture, as well as between self-gripping and suture. With glue fixation rather than mechanical fixation in laparoscopic repairs, incidence of chronic pain was lower than with mechanical fixation. Despite no definitive evidence of differences between methods, two network meta-analyses rated glue fixation as the most effective treatment for reducing the risk of recurrence in the absence of clear evidence of recurrence. Conclusion Glue fixation can be helpful in reducing the incidence of chronic pain without raising the risk of recurrence.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-021-02546-x


Comparison of perioperative outcomes between non-obese and obese patients undergoing robotic inguinal hernia repair: a propensity score matching analysis

Obesity in Rhode Island has not been investigated although it is a significant risk factor for the formation of ventral hernias and subsequent complications. The aim of this study was to compare the results of RIHR in obese and non-obese patients. Methods Prospectively collected data regarding RIHRs at a single center between 2013 and 2020 was retrospectively reviewed. The only significant difference in operative variables was a higher incidence of cord lipomas in the obese group. Conclusions No differences were found between obese and non-obese patients in the first study to look at obesity's role in RIHR. This procedure can be safely administered in obese people, but more research comparing body mass index classes is needed to determine whether a stricter BMI threshold exists for RIHR.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-021-02433-5


Effects of neuromuscular blockade on the surgical conditions of laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: a randomized clinical trial

While many studies have looked into the effects of neuromuscular blockade on the surgical conditions and post-operative pain of laparoscopic intraperitoneal surgery, no research has looked at TEP. We investigated the effect of NMB on TEP's surgical conditions and postoperative pain. Methods Forty-two adult patients undergoing unilateral TEP under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to either lyzed or non-paralyzed groups. The time from anesthesia's completion to the first requirement of postoperative analgesia was compared by the log-rank test for evaluation of postoperative pain. Conclusions NMB did not modify the surgical conditions or reduce postoperative pain. Trial registration was initiated in the UMIN clinical trials registry prior to patient enrollment.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10029-022-02570-5

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions