Advanced searches left 3/3

Hip Replacement - Springer Nature

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 11 September 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

How to analyze postoperative radiographs after total hip replacement

Total hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed procedures. It has been described as the most effective method of treating hip joint osteoarthritis at the end-stage. The purpose of this essay is to specify which prosthetic placement constituents can be easily measured on postoperative radiographs and advise how to interpret the findings. On surgical radiographs, multiple mechanical parameters, such as the center of rotation, femoral offset, acetabular offset, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, and leg length discrepancy, can be determined.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11604-022-01332-8


Complications and mid to long term outcomes for hip resurfacing versus total hip replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Introduction The long-term results of total hip replacement are excellent; however, in young and active patients, it has higher failure rates. This analysis was done to determine risks and outcomes between HRA and THA by comparing the two programs from the past ten years. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to conduct a risk of bias analysis. Overall complications rates were significantly lower in HRA compared to the THA group, with an Odds ratio of 2. 17. Both the functional findings were positive, but the Harris Hip Score was found to be significantly higher in the resurfacing group. Hip resurfacing provides relative relief during revisions, particularly in younger patients, and may be a better alternative to THR in the younger population.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00590-022-03361-5


Diabesity: a superadded effect contributing to worse total primary hip replacement operative outcomes for patients with diabetes and obesity

Although the beneficial effects of diabetes mellitus and obesity on total hip replacement outcomes have been widely investigated, their combined effect remains uncharacterized. This research was designed to determine the effect of diabesity on primary THR operative outcomes. After conducting the primary THR using an established arthroplasty database, a retrospective analysis was carried out comparing the results of patients with diabesity with a control cohort. The rate of superficial wound infection post-operatively was significantly elevated when combining the associated risk of obesity with the superadded effect of diabesity. Conclusions Diabesity confers a major benefit over previously published connections between THR results and obesity and diabetes in particular. Patients with diabesity experience more improvement in hip-specific functional outcomes, worse post-operative quality of life, and an elevated risk of superficial and deep wound infection following THR.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00402-022-04563-6

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions