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Hip Replacement - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 11 September 2022

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Dexmedetomidine potential in attenuating postoperative delirium in elderly patients after total hip joint replacement.

The aim of this report is to determine the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine in minimizing the occurrence of postoperative delirium in elderly patients following total hip joint replacement. Patients with total hip joint replacement and who were admitted to the hospital from August 1, 2017 to August 1, 2020 were included in this report. Using the Confusion Assessment Method, the occurrence of delirium was investigated twice a day for a week. Conclusions The incidence of postoperative delirium in the dexmedetomidine group was noticeably lower in comparison to that in the placebo group. The hospitalization time and cost of the dexmedetomidine drug regimen were also lower than those in the placebo group, as well as those in the placebo group. Conclusions The dexmedetomidine antibiotic can reduce the postoperative delirium incidence in older total hip joint replacement patients, as well as decreasing the related hospitalization duration and cost of these patients.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36074385


How to analyze postoperative radiographs after total hip replacement.

Total hip replacement is one of the most common surgical procedures. It is described as the most cost-effective method of treating end-stage osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This essay is intended to describe how to interpret obtained findings by showing which constituents of prosthetic placement can be easily measured on postoperative radiographs and pointing out how to interpret findings. On surgical radiographs, various mechanical parameters, such as the center of rotation, femoral offset, acetabular offset, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, acetabular inclination, and leg length discrepancy can be determined.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36063354


Outcomes and complications reported from a multiuser canine hip replacement registry over a 10-year period.

Aims The aim is to report findings and complications associated with total hip replacements using a multiuser canine hip registry and owner-administered questionnaire. Methods The total hip replacement cases submitted to a CHR were reviewed. Owners were e-mailed an online questionnaire with an adapted "Liverpool Osteoarthritis in Dogs" score. THRs in a pair of 1329 dogs were unilaterally THRs, and another group of 523 dogs had bilateral THRs, resulting in 2375 THRs. Both the 1328 and 900 days follow-ups for the Median veterinary surgeon and owner. By 461 owners, their scores increased relative to preoperative scores, according to postoperative scores. When used for revisions of femoral head and neck excisions, the BioMedtrix BFX and Helica implants were associated with increased complications. Comparing to patients in this first multiuser CHR, veterinary surgeons underreported complications. Clinical relevance Canine THRs are safe, effective procedures, but THR implants must be carefully selected when revising femoral head and neck excisions.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36062338


Functional Outcomes Following Hip Replacement in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

In community-dwelling older adults, this research sought to investigate the effect of hip replacement on functional outcomes and identify risk factors associated with clinically relevant improvement in physical function postoperatively. This cohort research was conducted within the ASPREE trial, with 698 participants receiving hip replacement and 677 age-and-matched controls without knee or hip replacement among 16,703 Australian participants aged u226570 years. Participants in the hip replacement had significantly lower pre- and post-replacement PCS scores when compared to controls. Participants with elevated postoperative PCS scores had significantly lower PCS and higher MCS scores preoperatively.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36079051


Compared learning curves of the direct anterior and anterolateral approach for minimally invasive hip replacement.

When it was first introduced to minimally invasive hip replacement surgery, we conducted a research comparing the training curves of a supervised trainee surgeon who undertook both the anterolateral and direct anterior strategy. The time from incision to suture gradually decreased over time, but did not differ between both groups. We recommend that supervision by an experienced surgeon positively influences both the minimally invasive DAA and anterolateral approach's learning curves, and conclude that the greatest change is seen within the first 60 cases.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36034727


Complications and mid to long term outcomes for hip resurfacing versus total hip replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

This review was done to determine risks and effects between HRA and THA by analyzing the most recent level 1 studies comparing the two groups from the past ten years. In a medium-to-long follow-up, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted using three databases to compare the differences between THR and HRA. Functional outcomes and ionic values at follow-up were both measured as secondary outcomes in secondary research. Using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, a risk of bias analysis was conducted. Overall complications rates in HRA were significantly lower in HRA compared to the THA group with an Odds ratio of 2. 17, according to a meta-analysis. Both the groups' results were satisfactory, but the Harris Hip Score was found to be much higher in the resurfacing group, although the Harris Hip Score was much higher. Hip resurfacing provides significant improvement during revisions, particularly in younger patients, and it can be a better alternative to THR in the younger population.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36006506


Barriers, enablers and acceptability of home-based care following elective total knee or hip replacement at a private hospital: A qualitative study of patient and caregiver perspectives.

Background To assist in the introduction of home-based care following an elective total knee or hip replacement in a private hospital, we investigated patient and caregiver barriers, as well as other aspects of care that may enhance its acceptability. The Theoretical Domains Framework was mapped to the Theoretical Domains Framework, with barrier and enabler themes mapped to the Theoretical Domains Framework. Barriers or enablers, as well as physicians' willingness to assist others; caregivers' willingness to provide assistance and patients' unwillingness to seek assistance; more information and opportunities to relax; and doctors' willingness to inform; trusting specialist advice concerning hospital stays; and spending for health insurance; and making payments; and payment for health insurance. Emotion, environmental context, and knowledge of consequences were all associated with barriers, as well as beliefs about consequences. Conclusions Multiple variables, including being uneasy and caregivers' willingness to provide assistance, may have influenced the adoption of home-based care from the viewpoints of privately insured patients and caregivers.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36001608


Antibiotic utilisation in primary and revision total hip replacement patients: A registry linkage cohort study of 106 253 patients using the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.

This report was designed to determine variation in antibiotic use rates before and after hip replacement surgery in those that were already confirmed for disease, revised for other reasons, and those without revision. Prior to primary THR antibiotic use, %-10% was reported. After primary THR, antibiotic utilisation rates in patients revised for PJI were higher among patients compared to non-revised patients, but the utilisation rate was lower in patients revised for reasons other than infection. Those revised for PJI patients were higher in injectable antibiotics, such as vancomycin, flucloxacillin, and cephazolin, but not in those revised for other reasons compared to the non-revised group. Conclusions Ongoing antibiotic use after primary surgery can indicate THR issues, and it could be a warning for primary care physicians to refer patients to experts for further investigation and management.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36070795


Handheld Navigation Improves Accuracy in Direct Anterior Total Hip Replacement.

Background Compared to conventional anterior total hip arthroplasty, this research sought to establish the completeness of placing the acetabular component, estimation of leg length, offset, radiation time, and dose, as well as operative time using a handheld navigation system. Methods Data were prospectively collected for a string of 159 THAs; 99 THAs with handheld navigation; and 60 conventional THAs. Statistical analysis was done for the different accuracy thresholds with P values set a 0. 05 for significance. Results The handheld navigation unit had a mean accuracy of 3. 2 u00b0 and 1. 8 u00b0 for version and inclination, respectively. In the handheld navigation group, fluoroscopic dose and time were lower. Handheld navigation was used in 31-35 cases. The mean operative time after the learning curve was similar to that in the traditional fluoroscopy group. Conclusions Handheld navigation systems delivered more precise results when minimizing radiation exposure to the surgeon and patient.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36032791


Diabesity: a superadded effect contributing to worse total primary hip replacement operative outcomes for patients with diabetes and obesity.

Although the impact of diabetes mellitus and obesity on total hip replacement outcomes has been widely studied, their combined effect remains uncharacterized. After performing a primary THR using an established arthroplasty registry, a retrospective analysis was conducted comparing the results of patients with diabesity with a control cohort. Patients with diabesity who had a larger reduction in OHS due to this change in addition to the independent effect of obesity led to an overall 2. 54 point decrease in patients with diabesity. When combining the associated risk of obesity with the superadded feature of diabesity, the risk of superficial wound infection post-operatively was much higher. Conclusions Diabesity has a major effect on THR studies and obesity and diabetes in particular, which has long been shown. Diabesity has a pronounced effect. Patients with diabesity experience less improvement in hip-specific functional outcome, worse post-operative quality of life, and an elevated risk of superficial and deep wound infection following THR.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35962795

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions