Advanced searches left 3/3

Hip Replacement - DOAJ

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 11 September 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Barriers, enablers and acceptability of home-based care following elective total knee or hip replacement at a private hospital: A qualitative study of patient and caregiver perspectives.

Background and Objectives We investigated patient and caregiver barriers, enablers, and components of care that may improve the hospital's acceptability in the wake of elective total knee or hip replacement in a private hospital. Results Eight themes emerged as barriers or enablers: caregivers' willingness to listen and patients' unwillingness to seek help; caregivers' willingness to share information; and patients' fear of going home; and insurance; spending for health insurance; and paying for hospitalization. Barrier barriers' reactions included emotion, environmental context, and assumptions about consequences. Conclusions Multiple reasons, including being afraid and caregivers' willingness to help others, can influence the implementation of home-based care from the viewpoints of privately insured patients and caregivers.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0273405


Functional Outcomes Following Hip Replacement in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

During the trial, which included 6,703 Australian participants aged u226570 years, 698 participants received hip replacement and 677 age- and sex-matched controls without knee or hip replacement. Participants with higher postoperative PCS scores had significantly lower PCs and higher MCS scores preoperatively. The degree of preoperative physical impairment was a key determinant of older people most likely to benefit from hip replacement surgery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11175117


Iliopsoas tendonitis following total hip replacement in highly dysplastic hips: a retrospective study

Abstract Background As a definite cause of groin pain following total hip arthroplasty, iliopsoas tendonitis is likely due to a multitude of factors. However, the occurrence and mechanism of iliopsoas tendonitis following complete hip replacement in dysplastic hips are uncertain. In this review, the four hip arthroplasties for Crowe type 2 to four dysplastic hips were compared to 126 total hip arthroplasties for hips without dysplasia. Between the two groups, there was no difference in the incidence of iliopsoas tendonitis. In the dysplastic group, there was a new cause of iliopsoas tendonitis following complete hip arthroplasty. Conclusions The dysplastic hips did not have a higher risk of postoperative iliopsoas tendonitis in this study, but not in this study. The reduction of acetabular components and soft tissue release in dysplastic hips may have helped, but irritated by an instable artificial femoral head may have been partially stopped.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-019-1176-z


Long-term outcomes of a dual-mobility cup and cementless triple-taper femoral stem combination in total hip replacement: a multicenter retrospective analysis

After a decade of use in patients undergoing THR, the new report set out the first long-term results with a rare combination of a later-generation dual-mobility cup and triple-taper cementless femoral stem. Any subject that had not previously been published, not properly revised, and still living were all invited for a single follow-up tour consisting of Merle du2019Aubgine Scores, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and standard radiographs. In any femoral Gruen zone, no subjects had radiolucent lines greater than 1 mm. At more than ten years follow-up, this combination of a later-generation dual-mobility cup and a cementless triple-taper stem was shown in 1 subject, with osteolysis seen in Gruen zones I, II, IV, and V. Conclusions This combination of a cup of cup migration was seen in 1 subject, and 1 subject had signs of osteolysis, which was seen in Gruen zones I, II, IV, and V.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-019-1436-y


A comparison of leg length and femoral offset discrepancies in hip resurfacing, large head metal-on- metal and conventional total hip replacement: a case series

Abstract Background: The leading cause of patient dissatisfaction with hip replacement surgery is a change in leg length and femoral offset restoration, which has major impacts on patient quality of life. The aim of this research is to compare biomechanical hip replacement in hip replacement, large-diameter head hip arthroplasty, and conventional total hip replacement. The post-operative radiographs of 20 patients were reviewed, 20 patients underwent hip replacement, 20 patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients underwent a large head metal-on-metal hip replacement, and 20 patients underwent a traditional small head Total Hip Replacement; 20 patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients had a hip replacement, and 20 patients underwent a traditional small head Total Hip Replacement; and 20 patients underwent a hip replacement of operative radiographs were published in Method Sixty patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients underwent a hip replacement, 20 patients had a hip replacement, 20 patients undergone a hip replacement, 20 patients under a hip replacement, 20 patients underwent a hip replacement; 20 patients had a hip replacement; and 20 patients had a hip replacement; 20 patients had a hip replacement; 20 patients had a conventional small head Method Sixty patient's; Conclusion The use of a larger-diameter femoral head in hip resurfacing does not fully account for the improved biomechanical restoration, since LHM did not recover femoral offset as accurately as accurately as well. Hip replacement is the most effective way to restore normal hip biomechanics, according to Wesley.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1749-799X-6-65


Wear Performance of Sequentially Cross-Linked Polyethylene Inserts against Ion-Treated CoCr, TiNbN-Coated CoCr and Al2O3 Ceramic Femoral Heads for Total Hip Replacement

According to ISO 14242, three 36 mm diameter ion-treated CoCr heads and three 36 mm diameter TiNbN-coated CoCr heads were articulated against sequentially cross-linked polyethylene inserts in a hip joint simulator. The cobalt ion release in the lubricant, as well as contact angles at the bearing surfaces, were investigated within the scope of the study and compared to 36 mm alumina ceramic femoral heads over a period of 5 million cycles. In comparison to the ion-treated CoCr heads, TiNbN-coated femoral heads had improved drainage and a lower ion level.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants3010014


Comparison of short-term outcomes between SuperPATH approach and conventional approaches in hip replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Abstract Background It is uncertain if the latest SuperPATH strategy helps patients in artificial hip joint replacement. To compare the short-term results of the SuperPATH treatment and standard approaches in hip joint replacement, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods of Hip Joint Replacement The systematic literature search up to April 2020 was searched for randomized controlled trials comparing SuperPATH and conventional hip joint replacements with standardized protocols. Results of 12 RCTs involving 726 patients met the inclusion criteria, one trial with level I evidence, and 11 trials with level II evidence. The overall meta-analysis revealed that the SuperPATH approach reduced incision length, pain VAS 7 day postoperatively, and HHS 7 day postoperatively. Hip replacement with the SuperPATH approach required a longer hospital stay than hip replacement using traditional methods.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-020-01884-3


Spinopelvic mobility is influenced by pre-existing contralateral hip arthroplasty: a matched-pair analysis in patients undergoing hip replacement

Abstract Background Spinopelvic mobility emerged as a contributing factor in total hip arthroplasty instability, according to an increasing number. Consequently, a propensity-score-matched analysis of primary THA patients comparing the individual segments of spinopelvic mobility between patients with pre-existing THA and no-existing THA was conducted. Thus, the research was conducted to see if patients with a pre-existing THA have modified spinopelvic mobility relative to the control group, and if spinopelvic mobility changes after THA. Methods A prospective observational research enrolled 197 elective primary THA patients, including N = 44 patients with a pre-existing unilateral THA. Pre- and postoperatively, the patients were given stereoradiography in standing and reclined sitting positions. The spinopelvic mobility was defined as lumbar stability, pelvic mobility, and hip mobility. Results Pelvic mobility was significantly greater in the pre-existing THA group compared to the control group u2206PT 8. 0; p00b0 8. 0; p00b0 8. 0; p00b0 8. 0; p00b0 8. 0; p0 b01 8. 0; p00b0 8. 0; p00b0 8. 0; p. b0 8. 0; u00b0 8. 0; p. b1 8. 0.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-022-02945-5


Metal on metal hip resurfacing versus uncemented custom total hip replacement - early results

Modern metal on metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty has gained traction as it is more stable, bone preservation, and is quicker to revise than total hip arthroplasty. Metal on metal resurfacing's early results have been promising. We have compared two closely matched cohorts of patients with respect to functionality, pain relief, and patient satisfaction. Methods This prospective review compares two cohorts of young, healthy patients treated with hip resurfacing and custom uncemented stems compared to stems. The average follow-up for the hip resurfacing program was 19. 2 months compared to 13. 4 months for the total hip replacement group. THA's scores in the THA group were 41. 1, 46. 4, and 50. 9 respectively, while the post operative scores were 14. 8, 95. 8 and 5. 0, respectively. Conclusion In the short run, there was no significant difference between the patients treated with hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1749-799X-5-8


Effectiveness of self-efficacy-enhancing interventions on rehabilitation following total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial with six-month follow-up

This research was intended to determine the effect of a self-efficacy-enhancing intervention scheme following hip replacement on patients'u2019 rehabilitation outcomes. Methods of Measurement In a grade A general hospital in Guangdong Province, China, a prospective randomized controlled trial was carried out using a repeated-measures, two-group design. The average age in intervention and control groups was 58 and 59, respectively, according to the study. After six months, intervention group scored 86. 83 %u00b1 5. 89 in rehabilitation self-efficacy, much higher than the control group and their hip function, and their hip function has flourished to u201c top-u201d, although the former's was limited to a u201cmiddle u201d level. Conclusions The self-efficacy-enhancing intervention by nurses resulted in improved exercise tolerance, physical, psychological, and social satisfaction after hip replacement, relative to routine care. Further research should explore the social involvement of patients with hip replacement surgery. Registration of trials retrospectively registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-022-03116-2

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions