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Hemolytic Anemia - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 04 August 2022

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Pyruvate kinase deficiency

Pyruvate kinase deficiency is an inherited condition that causes red blood cells to leak oxygen to the body's tissues. People with this disorder have a condition called chronic hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are destroyed prematurely, resulting in a red blood cell shortage. Specifically, pyruvate kinase deficiency is a typical cause of a form of inherited hemolytic anemia called hereditary nonspherocytic anemia. The red blood cells in hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia do not take on a spherical shape as they do in other forms of hemolytic anemia. Chronic hemolytic anemia can result in unusually pale skin, yellowing of the eyes and skin, extreme exhaustion, shortness of breath, and a fast heart rate. Symptoms can range from mild to severe in people with pyruvate kinase deficiency, hemolytic anemia, and related diseases. Some affected individuals have little to no signs of illness.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/pyruvate-kinase-deficiency


Hereditary spherocytosis

Hereditary spherocytosis is a disease that affects red blood cells. All newborns with hereditary spherocytosis have severe anemia, although it improves after the first year of life. According to the reports, 20 to 30 percent of people with hereditary spherocytosis have the mild type, 60 to 70% have the moderate/severe form, ten percent have the severe form, and 3 to 5 percent have the severe form. People with the mild disease may have very mild anemia or have no signs. People in the moderate form have anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly, and splenomegaly. The signs and symptoms of moderate hereditary spherocytosis first appear in childhood. Individuals in the moderate/severe style have all the characteristics of the moderate to severe type but also have severe anemia. Many people with the severe disease also have life-threatening anemia that necessitates frequent blood transfusions to replenish red blood cell supply.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hereditary-spherocytosis


Glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

Glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency is a genetic disease that causes red blood cells, which transport oxygen to the body's tissues. People with this disorder have a condition called chronic hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are destroyed prematurely, resulting in a shortage of red blood cells. GPI deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. A small percentage of people with GPI deficiency also have psychiatric disorders, including intellectual impairment and trouble with coordination of movements.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/glucose-phosphate-isomerase-deficiency


SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis

Distal renal tubular acidosis related to SLC4A1 is a kidney disease that can result in blood cell abnormalities. In people with distal renal tubular acidosis, the kidneys normally filter fluid and waste products from the body and eliminate them in urine; however, in people with distal renal tubular acidosis, the kidneys are unable to remove enough acid from the body, and the blood becomes too acidic. In addition, most children and adults with SLC4A1-associated renal tubular acidosis have excess calcium in the urine, calcium deposits in the kidneys, and kidney stones. People that are affected by the disease may also have low potassium levels in the blood. These individuals are said to have incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis, although their kidneys have trouble eliminating acids; these people are not expected to experience metabolic acidosis; People who had incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis at the start of life may experience metabolic acidosis later in life. SLC4A1-associated distal tubular acidosis sufferers may also have blood cell abnormalities. These can range from no signs to a condition called hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells begin to break down prematurely, resulting in a shortage of red blood cells. The autosomal dominant form is more common and is usually less noticeable than the autosomal recessive form. Although not everyone with this condition has abnormal blood cells, the autosomal recessive form is always associated with complete distal renal tubular acidosis and is more commonly associated with blood cell abnormalities.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/slc4a1-associated-distal-renal-tubular-acidosis


Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

When the red cells are broken down, iron and a molecule called bilirubin are released; individuals with threesephosphate isomerase deficiency have an elevated concentration of these substances in the blood. In people with a triosephosphate isomerase deficiency, mobility problems are usually present by age 2 in people with trisephosphate isomerase deficiency. In addition to trisephosphate deficiency, fatigue of other muscles, such as the heart and the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest cavity, can also result. Individuals with threesephosphate isomerase deficiency are at a higher risk of contracting infections because they have poorly functioning white blood cells. bacterial infections of the respiratory tract are the most common infections in people with triosephosphate isomerase deficiency. People with triplesephosphate isomerase deficiency often do not live past childhood due to respiratory disease.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/triosephosphate-isomerase-deficiency


Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome

Multiple autoimmune disorders in affected individuals are characterized by the onset of multiple autoimmune disorders. In early childhood, IPEX syndrome can be life-threatening. Almost all people with IPEX syndrome suffer from autoimmune enteropathy, a disorder of the intestines. When certain cells in the intestines are destroyed by a person's immune system, autoimmune enteropathy occurs. Autoimmune enteropathy is a common disorder in the first few months of life. People with IPEX syndrome also experience skin inflammation, commonly known as dermatitis. Eczema is the most common form of dermatitis in this condition, and it causes abnormal patches of red, irritated skin. Other skin disorders that cause similar symptoms are often present in IPEX syndrome. Polyendocrinopathy is used in IPEX syndrome because people can suffer with various disorders of the endocrine glands. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an autoimmune disorder that affects the pancreas and is the most common endocrine disorder present in people with IPEX syndrome. Autoimmune thyroid disease can also develop in people with IPEX syndrome. The thyroid gland, which is located in the lower neck, makes hormones. Individuals with IPEX syndrome exhibit several other autoimmune disorders in comparison to those that involve the intestines, skin, and endocrine glands. Autoimmune blood disorders are common; around half of those affected individuals have low blood cells, platelets, or specific white blood cells because these cells are destroyed by the immune system. IPEX syndrome affects the liver and kidneys in some people.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/immune-dysregulation-polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-x-linked-syndrome


Glycogen storage disease type VII

Type VII of Glycogen storage disease is a genetic disorder related to an inability to break down a complex sugar called glycogen in muscle cells. Muscle tissue can be abnormally broken down during exercise, releasing a protein called myoglobin. Myoglobinuria can harm the kidneys and lead to kidney disease if untreated. Because the damaged kidneys are unable to remove uric acid efficiently, people with the classic GSDVII form of GSDVII have elevated uric acid in the blood. In addition, affected individuals may also have elevated bilirubin levels in the blood, which can cause yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes. Individuals with classical GSDVII have elevated levels of creatine kinase in their blood. Infants with the severe infantile syndrome of GSDVII have poor muscle tone at birth, which leads to muscle wasting that worsens with time. Infants with a distressed and enlarged heart, as well as difficulty breathing normally, are affected infants. Individuals with this disorder tend not to live past their first year of life. The muscle weakness appears in adulthood, although some people have trouble with sustained exercise beginning in childhood. Hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are broken down prematurely, causes a shortage of red blood cells, is characterized by this hemolytic form of GSDVII. People with the hemolytic form of GSDVII have no signs or symptoms of muscle pain or weakness due to the condition.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/glycogen-storage-disease-type-vii


Glutathione synthetase deficiency

A disorder that prevents the manufacture of a key molecule called glutathione is Glutathione synthetase deficiency. Deficiency of Mild glutathione synthetase resultant in the destruction of red blood cells. Individuals with moderate glutathione synthetase deficiency may experience signs and symptoms in the blood and tissues as soon as birth, such as hemolytic anemia, 5-oxoprolinuria, and elevated acidity. People affected by moderate glutathione synthetase deficiency may have neurological problems in addition to the physical appearances of this disorder, as well as the physiological effects that accompany it. Recurrent bacterial infections among people with a severe glutathione synthetase deficiency may also result in recurrent bacterial infections.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/glutathione-synthetase-deficiency


Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

Deficiency of glutase-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is a genetic disorder that affects red blood cells, which transport oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body. Hemolysis, or red blood cell damage, is the opposite of hemolysis. Hemophilia anemia, which occurs when red blood cells are destroyed faster than the body can replace them, is the most common medical problem related to glucose-6-phosphate deficiency deficiency. Hemolytic anemia is most commonly caused by bacterial or viral infections or by some drugs in people with glucose-6-phosphate deficiency. Hemolytic anemia can also occur after eating fava beans or inhaling pollen from fava plants.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase-deficiency

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions