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Hemolytic Anemia - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 04 August 2022

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Systemic loxoscelism induced warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: clinical series and review.

Objectives: Describe the emergence of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia warm secondary to a brown recluse spider bite; also describe systemic loxoscelism; and research epidemiology, clinical findings, pathophysiology, and treatment options related to warm AIHA secondary to systemic loxoscelism. Methods Cases Series of two cases of warm AIHA as a result of systemic loxoscelism and a review of the current literature: epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic work-up, pathophysiology, and treatment options related to systemic loxoscelism secondary to systemic loxoscelism. Each patient was generally healthy and presenting with symptomatic anemia in the context of brown recluse spider bites. Conclusion Envenomation by a brown recluse spider Loxosceles reclusa can result in systemic loxoscelism, which can cause warm AIHA. Warm AIHA can be a life-threatening disease process. Corticosteroids should be tapered for three months as a result of a three-month cycle.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35544675


Hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia caused by glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency in a Chinese patient: a case report.

Glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in hereditary nonspherocytic anemia. The cause of GPI deficiency may be a homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation of the GPI gene on chromosome 19q13. Case study The 5-month-old boy was the subject of repeated jaundice episodes since birth. Mutation p. Gly271Glufs+131 is a unique frameshift null mutation in GPI deficiency. Conclusions In a patient with recurrent jaundice since birth, mutations in the GPI gene associated with HNSHA should be investigated.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35915427


Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia with a Normal Early Chest Radiography and Complicated with Drug-Induced Immune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report.

BACKGROUND Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a opportunistic disease that is common among immunocompromized patients, especially those with HIV. In addition, the early presentation of PJP, which includes normal chest radiograph and laboratory findings as well as the subacute presentation of PP in HIV patients with HIV, makes early diagnosis of the disease even more difficult for doctors. CASE REPORT The case of a 39-year-old man who had normal chest X-ray findings at the first stage of his presentation was presented in this case study. The diagnosis of PJP with underlying HIV was further aided by the patient's medical history, initial blood tests, and a high-risk sexual presence. CONCLUSIONS This case study aims to encourage primary care physicians to be aware of the PJP diagnosis and its nonspecific presentations, as well as the rare adverse effects of drugs to treat PJP.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35879878


Hemolytic anemia caused by an excessively kinked prosthetic graft after total arch replacement detected by 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging: A case report.

Rationale Hemolytic anemia is a rare postoperative complication of aortic surgery, and it can be triggered by an overly kinked graft that causes abnormal blood flow. We provide the following information based on this technique, including 4D flow MRI's help in performing the revision procedure for a patient with hemolytic anemia. She had undergone complete arch replacement with a frozen elephant trunk five years ago, five years before. Diagnosis Although the kinked graft at the ascending portion and cervical branches had 3 lesions of the kinked graft at the ascending portion and cervical branches, 4D flow MRI results showed that only the kinked graft at the ascending portion caused hemolytic anemia due to an elevated viscous energy loss around it. The kinked section was removed from the kinked section instead of revision surgery which required complete arch replacement. The 4D flow MRI findings revealed smoother circulation in the ascending portion of the building portion and reduced viscous energy loss.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35866824


Hemolytic anemia in COVID-19.

COVID-19 is a global pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2. Through the production of autoantibodies or even directly through CD147 or erythrocyte-mediated erythrocyte injury, hemolytic anemia has been linked to COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause hemolytic anemia directly through cytopathic injury or indirectly by auto-Abs gene induction. Early detection and management of COVID-19 patients' poor prognostic results may help prevent COVID-19 patients' poor prognostic results.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35802164


Splenectomy in the management of primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in dogs.

Background: The number of studies on the use of splenectomy for the treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia or immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in dogs is limited. Dogs are among the dogs' diseases that have been described retrospectively by splenectomy as part of the IMHA, ITP, and concurrent IMHA and severe thrombocytopenia in dogs. Fourteen client-owned dogs were identified across seven UK-based referral hospitals from 2005 to 2016, spanning a study period from 2005 to 2016. Treatment with splenectomy as part of the management strategy was classified as either successful or ineffective, based on clinical findings. Six of the seven dogs with ITP were treated with splenectomy as part of their training program, but one dog later developed suspected IMHA. Splenectomy was part of a fruitful management program in four dogs out of a total of seven dogs with IMHA. Splenectomy as part of the administration program was the only case in the CIST group that responded completely to leadership.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35801263


Hemolytic Anemia Caused by Kinked Graft 6 Months After Aortic Dissection Repair: A Case Report

Following central repair for acute aortic dissection, hemolysis related to kinked grafts is a rare complication. A 42-year-old man had undergone reconstruction of the ascending aorta and a root repair for type A aortic dissection six months ago. With gross change in urine color, indicating hemoglobinuria, the serum hemoglobin level decreased to 8. 6 g/dL and lactate dehydrogenase levels increased to 3071 IU/L. Conclusion: We herein describe a case of hemolytic anemia resulting from the kinking of the graft 6 months after acute aortic dissection repair.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR514552

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions