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Healthy Diet - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 11 May 2022

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Association of Diet and Antimicrobial Resistance in Healthy U.S. Adults.

Since resistance to antibiotics is embedded in the microbiome, microbiome studies aimed at improving the taxonomic composition of the gut may enable us to prophylactically engineer microbiomes that have fewer antibiotic resistant genes. Individuals in the lowest quartile of ARGs consumed significantly more fiber in their diets than medium- and high-ARG individuals, which was concomitant with elevated amounts of obligate anaerobes, particularly from the family Clostridiaceae, boosting their gut microbiota. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a significant contributor to health care services in the United States, with the public health profession generally agree that AMR will be a major cause of death in the coming decades. Humans have antibiotic resistance in the microbes that live in and on us, collectively known as the human microbiome. Diet is a simple way for shaping the human gut microbiome and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing antibiotic resistance, but yet no information is available about the relationship between diet and AMR. We investigated the connection between healthy individuals with various amounts of antibiotic resistance genes and discovered that people who consumed different diets that were high in fiber and low in animal protein had fewer antibiotic resistance genes. Dietary interventions may be helpful in reducing the risk of antimicrobial resistance and may eventually inspire dietary recommendations that will explore how diet can minimize infectious disease's impact.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35536006


Diet quality in cystic fibrosis – associations with patient reported outcome measures and enablers and barriers to eating a healthy diet: A protocol paper for a mixed methods study

Background: People with cystic fibrosis have elevated energy requirements. The objective is to investigate habitual dietary intakes in PWCF and assess compliance with CF diet recommendations and population-specific health eating recommendations; calculate a diet quality score and the inflammatory risk for the typical diet consumed by PWCF; and assess correlations with patient reported outcome measures; investigate causes of new consumption patterns and enablers; and barriers to eating a healthy diet. The aim and will be addressed will be based on three-day food diaries and food frequency questionnaires. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension scores will rise and the Healthy Eating Index-International will determine diet quality scores. The Dietary Inflammatory Index will determine the diet's inflammatory potential. However, a better understanding of what adults with CF currently consume and what they need in terms of diet and dietary guidance into the future is helpful.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR488924


Short-term high-fat diet alters acetaminophen metabolism in healthy individuals.

A short-term high-fat diet causes changes in the steatotic liver and can also influence hepatic drug enzyme expression. This research was done to determine the effect of a three-day hypercaloric high-fat diet on plasma levels of acetaminophen metabolites. The participants were either on a regular or a regular diet with 500 mL cream as a component and then fasted overnight. The plasma concentrations of acetaminophen glucuronide, acetaminophen sulfate, 3-cysteinyl-acetaminophen, and 3-acetaminophen were determined after ingesting 1000 mg acetaminophen sulfate, 3-cysteinyl-acetaminophen acetaminophen sulfate, 3-cysteinyl-acetaminophen, acetaminophen The three-day high-fat diet increased the extrapolated area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity of APAP-Cys by 2%, and from 0 to 8 h of APAP-Cys-NAC by 39% by a wholly. Conclusions A short-term hypercaloric high-fat diet raises the APAP metabolites produced by the oxidation pathway, which may increase the risk of hepatotoxicity.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35500453


A multi-component tailored intervention in family childcare homes improves diet quality and sedentary behavior of preschool children compared to an attention control: results from the Healthy Start-Comienzos Sanos cluster randomized trial.

Background and context are important factors in influencing child eating and physical activity. However, few initiatives have focused on this population, low income, diverse racial/ethnic groups, and obesity, with many children of low-income and numerous ethnic groups of low-income and mixed racial/ethnic backgrounds who are at risk for poor diet quality, low PA, and obesity. The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of a multicomponent intervention in FCCH on the diet and PA of 2-5 year old children in their care, according to the author. Methods Containing A cluster-randomized trial by Healthy Start/Comienzos Sanos evaluated an 8-month nutrition and PA intervention that included four elements: brief motivational interviewing, targeted articles, newsletters, and videos, group support meetings, and active play toys were all evaluated. All the following health indicators were collected at baseline and 8-months: 1 Healthy Eating Index HEI-2015 estimates obtained from diet testing, as well as two accelerometer measurements of PA. Compared to children in the comparison group FCCH, vegetable component scores increased by 7. 2 points, p =. 025 and added sugar 0. 94 points, p =. 025. Intervention FCCH decreased sedentary time by 5. 7 percent, relative to children in the comparison group. 021. Conclusions The multicomponent Healthy Start project in FCCH was extremely successful in improving diet quality and sedentary behavior of children, which shows the promise of obesity prevention efforts in this setting.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35428298


Epigenetic Effects of Healthy Foods and Lifestyle Habits From The Southern European Atlantic Diet Pattern: A Narrative Review.

The Southern European Atlantic Diet, also known as Atlantic Diet, is a unique dietary pattern that occurs in areas with higher life expectancy, indicating that this particular eating pattern is associated with positive health benefits. Epigenetic markers associated with diet or vitamins, as well as environmental causes, influence gene expression, and, therefore, are both health and disease related. Based on new research into the main components of these diet patterns, we examined the key characteristics that characterize the Southern European Atlantic Diet and the potential epigenetic changes associated with it in this research. In conclusion, we propose that the Southern European Atlantic Diet might contribute to a healthy aging by epigenetic mechanisms, based on available literature.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35421213


Effect of diet change in healthy dogs with subclinical cardiac biomarker or echocardiographic abnormalities.

In healthy dogs eating grain-free, the highest-sensitivity cardiac troponin I concentrations were higher than those eating grain-inclusive diets, according to a new report. Healthy dogs with subopticious heart abnormalities on GF diets at baseline will see changes in cardiac biomarkers and echocardiographic variables as a result of diet change, while healthy dogs eating GI diets at baseline will not improve. There were statistically significant time: group interactions for hs-cTnI and normalized left ventricular internal systolic diameters, with GF dogs showing larger decreases in these variables than GI dogs. At baseline and 0. 092 at 1 y, and for GI dogs, there were 0. 141 at baseline and 0. 092 at 1 y, and 0. 051 at 1 y, and 0. 061 at 1 y. At baseline and 0. 87 at 1 y, and for GI dogs, it was 1. 01 at baseline and 1. 10 at 1 y, and at 1. 10 at 1 y.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35420218


The AHA Recommendations for a Healthy Diet and Ultra-Processed Foods: Building a New Diet Quality Index.

The American Heart Association has introduced the term "ideal cardiovascular fitness" as a seven-component score, which includes health dietary measurements. Multiple cardiometabolic and cardiovascular diseases are connected to a variety of cardiometabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We recommend that the Cardiovascular Health Diet Index, a diet quality indicator that incorporates the AHA's recommendations of a healthy diet for cardiovascular health and ultra-processed foods, be developed and validated. We used dietary records obtained from 14,779 participants of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adults Health, which were based on a 114-item FFQ. The mean CHDI was 57. 1 points higher than 57. 1 percent. Cronbach's alpha value was 0. 50 percent, at 0. 50. After age and sex change, the CHDI score remained consistent with improved overall dietary stability. The use of CHDI is expected to determine the population's compliance with dietary recommendations for cardiovascular health and preventing cardiovascular disease.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35479734

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions