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Geothermal Energy - OSTI GOV

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Last Updated: 13 April 2022

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Geothermal Energy and Resilience in Arctic Countries

Heat and electricity sources in the Arctic countries' grid-connected communities vary. Many of the Arctic countries use baseload renewable energy sources for heat and electricity. Communities in Arctic countries with high prevalence of those resources appear to be able to enhance community stability thanks to the exploitation of baseload renewable energy sources on-site for combined heat and power. On the other hand, increasing vulnerability in other Arctic countries may be exacerbated by the use of diesel by remote communities. Despite the fact that geothermal energy is now used in all eight Arctic countries, resources are poorly mapped, and specifics can be impossible to come by. Despite this, geothermal energy produces heat and often electricity at both utility scales and on the microgrid scale. Geothermal electricity is produced in Iceland, Russia, and the United States. In Iceland, Russia, United States, Canada, and Norway, direct use of geothermal heat is used. Where is integrated geothermal energy sources for communities in Arctic countries? We reframe geothermal heat and power systems as integrated energy sources in this paper, asking the question: are integrated geothermal energy sources (where available and economic – resilient solutions for communities in Arctic countries? With a focus on microgrids and small-scale applications, we determine the sustainability of integrated geothermal energy systems. Anywhere in a grid-connected or remote off-grid scenario, refining our knowledge of geothermal resources in Arctic countries could increase the energy availability of the country's residents.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1862005


An HPC-Based Hydrothermal Finite Element Simulator for Modeling Underground Response to Community-Scale Geothermal Energy Production

Geothermal heat, as renewable energy, has a large advantage over respect to its environmental impact due to significantly lower CO2 emissions than conventional fossil fuels. Open and closed-loop geothermal heat pumps, which use shallow geothermal technologies, are an effective method for cooling and heating buildings, especially in urban areas. Integrated use of geothermal energy technologies for district heating, cooling, and thermal storage can be used to optimize the subsurface for communities, providing them with multiple sustainable energy and community resilience benefits. The HPC simulator was validated by comparing the findings of a benchmark case study against COMSOL Multiphysics, in which Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage is modeled and a process of heat injection into ATES is emulated. The use of an energy pile system at the Treasure Island redevelopment site was chosen as a case study to show the HPC capability of the newly developed simulator.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1825901


Geothermal Energy R&D: An Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office

The Geothermal Technologies Office of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the United States has invested more than $470 million in research and development since 2015 to realize its three strategic goals: unlocking the promise of enhanced geothermal systems, advance technologies to increase geothermal energy on the US electricity grid, and help R&D extend geothermal energy opportunities throughout the United States.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1828794


Earth Source Heat: A Cascaded Systems Approach to DDU of Geothermal Energy on the Cornell Campus

This article discusses the completion of the DOE study DE-EE0008103: Earth Source Heat: A Cascaded Systems Approach to Geothermal Energy on the Cornell Campus. This report found a viable renewable energy source for Cornell's specific use of Deep Direct Use geothermal energy for its Ithaca, NY campus district heating system. According to hourly campus heating profiles and proposed integrated equipment controls, stochastic modeling combined two potential subsurface resources to documented campus heating operations based on hourly campus heating profiles and proposed integrated equipment controls. Both the subsurface and the surface applications are important; at the high end, our pre-designed solutions delivered up to 75% of existing campus heat load with integrated high-temperature heat pumps; at the high end, our integrated high-temperature heat pumps yielded up to 75% of existing campus heat load. The LCOH's values for a plant in the Northeast United States that obtains natural gas at commercial rates are all lower than the comparable cost of heating energy with a natural gas boiler for a facility in the northeast United States that obtains natural gas at commercial rates. In some cases, the total project cost may be even lower and even negative as a result of such a program's environmental and regional economic benefits; i. e. , in some cases a project that achieves the listed results will have more value to the climate and regional economy than the total project timeline.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1844600

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions