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Geothermal Energy - Crossref

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Last Updated: 11 August 2022

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Characterisation of Ground Thermal and Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour for Shallow Geothermal Energy Applications

As a thermal reservoir is expected in the near future, the ground is getting more popular. In several regions around the world in the last decades, Shallow geothermal energy systems have been proven to be a cost-effective alternative to buildings and infrastructure conditioning in several regions around the world. Recently novel solutions, including energy geostructures, have also been introduced, including energy geostructures, where SGE systems are integrated with foundation heat exchangers. The aim of this paper is to present the key methods and procedures to test ground thermal properties for SGE systems in an integrated manner, as well as a critical analysis of the methods. In situ testing encompassing all variations of the thermal response test is described in detail, including a first comparison between new and traditional approaches. These coupled processes are vital in confirming the structural integrity of energy geostructures, but formal methods for parameter determination are also lacking.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/en10122044


Geothermal energy

All forms of heat stored within the Earth are represented by the term "u2018geothermal energy" U2019. According to an estimated average surface temperature of 15-u25e6C, the Earth's total heat content is of the order of 12. 6 MJ, with the crust containing 5. 4 MJ. Geothermal electricity is readily available almost every world, based on the simple fact that the deeper you go, the hotter it gets. U2019 The typical geothermal gradient is about 2. 5 u20133–u25e6 meters per 100 meters, but this figure is uneventful; it is highest at the edges of the tectonic plates and over hot spots; while geothermal energy generation has been concentrated since 1904, where high temperature gradients are present and where electricity generation from geothermal energy has flourished since 1904. Geothermal energies are traditionally classified into high, medium, and low temperature zones. Also at extremely hot temperatures, geothermal energy can be used over a temperature range from a few degrees to several hundred degrees.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199209965.003.0005


Earth Heat and Lunar Gravity Geothermal And Tidal Energy

With the exception of nuclear's contribution, the sun'u2014 energy source for all of these sources is the sun's u2014 energy, which took the majority of the energy from renewable sources in the case of wind and solar. We now turn to a discussion of the potential for electricity generation from geothermal sources and ocean tides. There are two main contributions to the Earth's interior's energy reaching the surface. Hydrothermal reservoirs, subsurface environments characterized by the presence of significant amounts of high-temperature water deposited by lava or contact with unusually hot crustal material, are of particular concern in terms of harvesting the internal energy source to produce electricity. For the most part, percolation from the surface is supplied by porous rock in hydrothermal reservoirs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190490331.003.0017


Icelandic Geothermal Energy: Shifting Ground

Geothermal energy, according to this, is a more unique form of renewable energy in that it can directly contribute to heating, cooling, and electricity services. Unlike many of its siblings, geothermal energy can produce a more stable and renewable form of energy that is largely unaffected by weather. According to UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christina Figueres, the chapter explores leadership in renewable energy use and related topics in Iceland, a little world that roars. With a diverse industrial cluster that has developed around the technology, the country leads internationally in terms of geothermal heat capacity per capita and serves as the world's largest source of international training and consultancy on geothermal energy. Iceland was one of Europe's poorest countries in the twentieth century and is now ranked number one in the United Nations Development Program's Human Development Index u2019.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199362554.003.0007


Our Energy Income: Geothermal, Hydropower, Wind, Solar, and Biomass

We are likely to engineer the applications properly without causing additional difficulties along the way, which will lead to a path toward longevity. We begin by enumerating our key energy income sources with this in mind:. Radiant energy from the sun, which also controls the wind and the water cycle, and plants' heating is increased by heat energy from the sun's gravitational attraction Wave and ocean-current energy. The sun's radiant energy, whether direct or indirectly spawns biomass, photovoltaic electricity, solar-thermal, and wind energy. In addition, wave energy, ocean-current energy, and hydropower are all examples of derivative energy sources. In chapter 3, we briefly discussed these income sources and noted that the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface of Earth is around 23,000 CMO/yr.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780195325546.003.0016


A Review on Geothermal Renewable Energy Systems for Eco-Friendly Air-Conditioning

On average, air conditioning uses about one-fifth of the total power used in buildings globally. In an attempt to achieve cleaner energy production with a low Global Warming Potential and low ozone depletion potential, the present paper seeks to present the current status of Earth-to-Air Heat exchangers employed to minimize energy consumption and minimize the impact on the climate.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/en15155519


An online survey to explore the awareness and acceptance of geothermal energy among an educated segment of the population in five European and American countries

This report, therefore, explores the extent of knowledge and acceptance of deep geothermal energy within an educated population in five European and American countries at different stages of geothermal development.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-40991/v3


An online survey to explore the awareness and acceptance of geothermal energy among an educated segment of the population in five European and American countries

This report, however, is focused on identifying the level of knowledge and acceptance of deep geothermal energy within an educated segment of the population in five European and American countries at various stages of geothermal development.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-40991/v2


An online survey to evaluate the awareness and acceptance of geothermal energy among an educated segment of the population in five European and American countries

This report focuses on the level of knowledge and acceptance of geothermal energy within an educated group of the population in five European and American countries facing different stages of geothermal transition.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-40991/v1


Unearthing the Dynamics of Indonesia’s Geothermal Energy Development

For Indonesia, renewable energy sources are required and the goal of achieving 7. 2 GW of geothermal energy by 2025 must be met by 2025. Geothermal energy development is also required for the country to develop renewable energy sources and achieve its target of reaching 7. 2 GW of geothermal energy by 2025. This paper explores geothermal evolution from a theoretical and holistic perspective, employing the interview technique to allow the conceptualization of the geothermal processes using the system dynamics approach. Several key factors that influence the development of geothermal energy in Indonesia are: capital investment, the collection of upstream data to reduce risk, infrastructure design, pricing, inspection procedures, environmental issues, and public acceptance. The SD model illustrates several key factors that are contributing to the growth of geothermal energy in Indonesia, such as capital investment, risk reduction, estimation of upstream data to minimize risk, infrastructure development, infrastructure development, education, and public acceptance.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/en15145009

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions