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Gastroenteritis - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 11 June 2022

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Regional hospitalisation and seasonal variations of Pediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis pre- and post-RV vaccination: a prospective and retrospective study

"Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children worldwide and is a leading cause of gastroenteritis in children, with a significant burden. " This report was designed to investigate hospital admissions and seasonal occurrences of rotavirus gastroenteritis in a single district general hospital during a pre- and post-vaccination period. Methods In the post-vaccination year, all children up to three years old who came to Mayo University Hospital with vomiting and diarrhea were recruited and tested for rotavirus. In the year after vaccination, there was no delay in the onset of RV season or a decrease of the peak of RV infection. Conclusions Compared to three pre-vaccination years, the total number of gastroenteritis presentations, gastroenteritis hospital admissions, and rotavirus positive gastroenteritis cases was reduced, as well as the length of the rotavirus season.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12519-022-00546-0


Course of uncomplicated acute gastroenteritis in children presenting to out-of-hours primary care

"Background" The aim of this article is to detail the course of vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and clinical progression in children with uncomplicated gastroenteritis at presentation. Since young children and children with severe vomiting are at an elevated risk of dehydration, these groups' potentially more complicated courses are outlined separately. The day most commonly associated with decline and the signs and symptoms present in children who had deteriorated during follow-up were also outlined. In total, 359 children were diagnosed with uncomplicated acute gastroenteritis to the out-of-hours primary care facility, which was out-of-hours. Urgently, vomiting and fever decreased quickly, but diarrhea dropped at a much slower rate, especially among children under the age of 6u201312 months. The following is a more prevalent rate of vomiting and fever in children who suffered during the follow-up than those who did not recover after the follow-up. Clinicians should be vigilant for children with higher vomiting rates at onset and follow-up because these children are more likely to deteriorate. ".

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12875-022-01739-2

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions