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Gastroenteritis - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 11 June 2022

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Model-based index reveals highly varied correlation between norovirus wastewater surveillance and gastroenteritis hospital admissions

"We discovered the wastewater viral load correlated well with the patient viral load calculated from hospital admissions during an outbreak outbreak," the association became loosened in the subsequent non-outbreak period, implying the volatility that was caused by mild and asymptomatic patients. " Our results show that: 1 the uncertainty of wastewater surveillance can be traced to various temporal scales, and 2 analyzing the pathological and environmental impacts is crucial to understanding wastewater surveillance results.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR504455


Emerging norovirus GII.4 Sydney[P31] causing acute gastroenteritis outbreak in children in Japan, during COVID-19, 2021.

"NoV infection has drastically reduced NoV infection in Japan during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic," says school closures and no outbreak related to NoV infection has been reported. " NoV gastroenteritis caused by an immunochromatographic kit at a pediatric outpatient clinic in Maizuru city's three weeks from September 13 to October 8, 2021, were tested for the presence of NoV GII by reverse transcriptase chain reaction, genome sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of NoV GII. When compared to previously identified sporadic NoV GII. 4 strains isolated in Japan, amino acid substitutions in open reading frame1 and ORF2 genes were discovered. NoV GII. 4 Sydney[P31] causing acute gastroenteritis outbreak in children in Japan during the COVID-19 pandemic, and suggests that further monitoring of the NoV GII. 4 variants should be carried out. ".

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35661616


Comparison of End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide (ETCO2) Gradient and Vena Cava Collapsibility Index (VCCI) in Response to Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Patients with Moderate and Severe Dehydration and Acute Gastroenteritis.

"Introduction and aim Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common medical disorders worldwide, and dehydration in severe AGE patients can cause significant morbidity and mortality. " The respiratory rate per minute rises in dehydration-based dehydration, but the carbon dioxide pressure in arterial blood decreases. According to this research, ETCO2 measurements can be used to determine metabolic fluid loss, dehydration level, and decrease in dehydration level after fluid replacement and its comparison with Vena Cava Collapsibility Index. According to the Primary Options of Acute Care Clinical Dehydration Scale, spontaneously breathing patients admitted to a tertiary education and research hospital with signs of AGE and severe dehydration were found to be moderately and severely dehydrated in the emergency department, and were reported to be moderately and severely dehydrated. P" is the measure of the average increase in ETCO2 at 3. 653 mmHg P. ".

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35611835


Recommendation document on rapid intravenous rehydration in acute gastroenteritis.

"Introduction" The Rapid Intravenous Rehydratation guidelines in children affected by acute gastroenteritis dehydration are supported by current scientific findings, but clinical usage is also very different. Until specifically contraindicated or acutely comorbidity poor result, moderate evidence, no recommendations were made, but we can show as the main ones: 1 RIR is safe for children affected by mild-moderate dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis. Strong, high, recommending saline fluid as the first option light, low, supplemented by glucose 2. 5% in those patients showing normoglycemia and ketosis good, moderate. ".

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35624005


Course of uncomplicated acute gastroenteritis in children presenting to out-of-hours primary care.

"Background" is a web page that presents information on vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and clinical deterioration in children with uncomplicated gastroenteritis at presentation. Because young children and children with severe vomiting are at an elevated risk of dehydration, the potentially more difficult courses of these groups are listed separately. The day most commonly associated with decline and the signs present in children who died after follow-up were also noted. In total, 359 children were diagnosed with acute gastroenteritis with uncomplicated acute gastroenteritis to the out-of-hours primary care facility, which was out-of-hours. Vomiting and fever became extremely common, but diarrhea decreased at a much slower pace, particularly among children aged 6 to 12 months. At presentation, children who deteriorated during the sequel have a higher incidence of vomiting and fever than those who did not, and there were also higher incidences of vomiting and fever during follow-up. Clinicians should be cautious for children with higher vomiting rates at both presentation and follow-up because these children are more likely to deteriorate. ".

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35606695

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions