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Gas - NASA Technology Transfer Program

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Last Updated: 03 July 2022

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Gas Composition Sensing Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

Infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and/or thermal conductivity tests are the primary components of conventional inert gas analysis systems. Thermal conductivity meters are available for fixed and portable instruments, but this technique is not suitable for measuring extremely low concentrations of a gas. Sensing's strategy is based on the development of an electrical discharge current and determining the specific gas breakdown voltage associated with each gas sample.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/TOP2-111


Gas Sensors Based on Coated and Doped Carbon Nanotubes

Based on single-walled carbon nanotubes, NASA's Ames Research Center provides the opportunity to license and codevelop electronic, inexpensive, low-power gas sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes. There is a significant need for the development of next-generation chemical sensors with greater sensitivity in the parts per million to parts per billion levels and low power consumption. NASA researchers pioneered an effective gas detection by coating or doping the SWCNTs with suitable materials.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/TOP2-112


Premixed, High-Pressure, Multi-Fuel Burner

With a low pressure drop, NASA's Glenn Research Center has produced a new blueprint for a fully premixed high-pressure burner that can be used on a variety of gaseous fuels and oxidizers, including hydrogen-air mixtures. This technology is also applicable to process gas heaters, chemical separation, process gas afterburners, kiln or furnace burners, utility boiler burners, fuel cell processing burners, and fuel cell processing burners.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/LEW-TOPS-134


Electrical Response Using Nanotubes on a Fibrous Substrate

This NASA innovation is a unique resistor-type gas/vapor sensor on cellulose paper that uses carboxylic acid functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes as the sensing material. Although delivering excellent results, electronic devices made on cellulose paper substrates can be less expensive than those of solid-state units while still delivering outstanding results. Gas sensors are usually categorized according to transduction methods, and each class has its own strengths and weaknesses, according to transduction techniques.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/TOP2-172


Interference Reduction Algorithm for Continuous Wave Lidar Return Data

NASA's Langley Research Center has developed a waveform processing method to minimize signal noise caused by sources of interference that can degrade continuous wave lidar return results.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/LAR-TOPS-111


Real Time Radiation Monitoring Using Nanotechnology

When exposed to protons and other high energy particles over time, NASA has patented a unique chemical sensor array that uses nanostructures for measuring chemical species or gas molecules, which is not affected. As the sensing media between a pair of interdigitated electrodes between a pair of interdigitated electrodes, a nanotechnology-enabled chemical sensor array employs single walled carbon nanotubes and metal catalyst-doped single walled carbon nanotubes and polymer-coated SWCNTs.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/TOP2-236


Room temperature oxygen sensors

Oxygen sensors are used in a variety of industries, including electronic fuel injection and pollution control in the automotive industry, for monitoring oxygen levels in controlled environments, such as space craft or space suits, and many others. NASA Ames Research Center has developed novel oxygen sensors made of a blend of graphene and titanium dioxide that are capable of measuring O2 gas at room temperature and ambient pressure.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/TOP2-300


Graphene-Based Reversible Nano-Switch/Sensor Schottky Diode Device

In a variety of settings, NASA's Glenn Research Center has developed a ground-breaking new microsensor that detects hazardous gases and explosives. The nano-Switch Sensor Schottky Diode unit of Glenn consists of a thin film of graphene coated on a specially prepared silicon wafer. The nanoSSSD can be linked to a visual and/or sound alarm that is automatically generated when the sensor detects a certain gas and then returns to its idle mode when the gas is no longer present.

Source link: https://technology.nasa.gov/patent/LEW-TOPS-42

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions