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Family History - Crossref

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Last Updated: 06 August 2022

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The role of family and personal psychiatric history in postconcussion syndrome following sport-related concussion: a story of compounding risk

The authors investigated the role of family and personal psychiatric history in the risk of developing PCs in a cohort of concussed high school athletes. METHODS A retrospective cohort study of 154 high school athletes with complete documentation of postconcussion syndrome recovery or persistence was conducted for six weeks. Two positive FPH and personal psychiatric history were established, with two others displaying positive FPH and personal psychiatric history FPH/PPH, 2 positive FPH only, and 3 negative family and personal psychiatric histories controls. Results Athletes With FPH/PPH Athletes with FPH/PPH increased risk of PCs as compared to controls, u03c7 2 = 8. 90, 95% CI 1. 71, 14. 99; Or 5. 60, 5. 76, 95% CI 1. 71, 13. 07; U201314. 99; or 5. 09, 9. 76, 7. 60; CI 1. 71. 90; p = 0. 018; OR 5. 06, 9. 79. 90; OR2. 52, 95% CI 1. 20. 30) 5. 30; or 2. 20; u20135. 30 Comparing athletes with FPH/PPH to athletes with FPH/PPH to athletes with FPH only, no additional PCS risk was found, according to a report by the CDC; OR 2. 01, 95%, 0. 9 percent CI 0. 68. 94 CONCLUSIONS Concussed high school athletes with FPH/PPH were more likely to have PCs than controls more likely to have PCs than controls. Athletes with only FPH were over 2. 5 times more likely to experience PCs than controls. PCS are particularly vulnerable to PCS among those with an FPH of anxiety or bipolar disorder. These results show that not only are athletes with FPH/PPH on decline after SRC, but those with an FPH/PPH conditionu2014 especially anxiety or bipolar disorderu2014 could be at risk.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.3.peds1850


Surveillance survey of family history in children with neural tube defects

In this research, the authors' aim was to explore the family roots of their population of patients with NTDs. RESULTS The overall prevalence of family history of NTDs in children with an NTD was 16. 9%, of which 3. 1% were in first-degree relatives. 17. 7% of patients with myelomeningocele had a positive family history for NTDs, with 38 percent in first-degree relatives. In the maternal lineage, the family's history in the paternal lineage for all NTDs was 8. 7% versus 10. 6%. Twenty-two patients had a family history of other congenital CNS disorders. CONCLUSIONS The family history of NTDs in children with NTDs with no correlation between maternal and paternal lineage was similar to that of maternal and paternal lineage. This high rate of positive family history has shown that genetics and epigenetics may have a larger role in NTD's pathogenesis in the modern era of widespread folate supplementation.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.12.peds1668

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions