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Eating Disorder - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 13 September 2022

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Lifestyle pattern changes, eating disorders, and sleep quality in diabetes: how are the effects of 18 months of COVID-19 pandemic being felt?

Aims, Germany The pandemic resulted in a lifestyle disorder that could adversely impact diabetic patients with diabetes. After 18 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, patients' opinions about changes in lifestyle, eating, and sleeping patterns have been collected, allowing us to determine if pandemic conditions are predictors of rising in eating and sleeping patterns. Methods This was a longitudinal survey that followed diabetic patients with diabetes from April 2020 to July 2021 in Southern Brazil. About one out of four participants reported feelings of hunger and changes in their eating habits for financial reasons. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups had no difference in regards to sleep habits, and more than half of the participants reported taking naps during the day, out of which 30. 5% of them reported decreased sleep quality. Participants with type 2 diabetes, age u2265-60 years, diabetes course u2265 15 years, and perceived emotional eating were all associated with food quality declines. Both type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes were attributed to poor sleep during the pandemic, with age u2265-60 years. Conclusions: According to the adversities of this period, some lifestyle habits exacerbated and some improved at the end of 18 months of social distancing, showing that these patients responded differently to the adversities of that period. The evidence of clinical features connected to food and sleep quality has provided new insight into prioritizing interventions in crisis situations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00592-022-01927-7


A population-based study of macronutrient intake according to mental health status with a focus on pure and comorbid anxiety and eating disorders

Purpose: Eating disorders and anxiety influence food choices. In addition, comorbid anxiety has been shown to raise ED symptoms and severity. Methods The NutriNet-Santu00e9 cohort, which completed once the state-Trait Anxiety Inventory underwent initial testing for ED in 2013, and 2014, the SCOFF questionnaire screening for ED included 126 people. In the pure HP group, significantly reduced intakes of added sugar and plant-based protein as well as a higher intake of cholesterol were discovered, but not in the comorbid anxiety + HP group. Conclusion This large epidemiological study provided some insight into the differences in macronutrient intake between people with pure or comorbid anxiety and ED. To elucidate causality and potential effect change of the observed results, future prospective studies and studies using clinically defined anxiety and ED are needed.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-022-02923-x


Measuring exercise in eating disorder patients: a Delphi study to aggregate clinical and research knowledge

Exercise is a key component of most eating disorders. People with an eating disorder exercise regularly, according to the researchers, whether they are motivated to do so or because it helps them cope with negative emotions. Exercise can be referred to as u2018compulsive exerciseu2019, and it can have both physical and mental consequences. Background Exercise is a standard component of most eating disorders, and it has been shown to have a variety of adverse effects on treatment success. This research therefore sought to gather expert clinicians' and researchers' opinions on how to identify and quantify compulsive exercise in eating disorder patients. The expert panel was also asked about questionnaire construction and potential challenges when monitoring compulsive exercise. Methods This paper used the Delphi technique to achieve consensus amongst an expert panel. Four open-ended questions about the definition and measurement of compulsive exercise in eating disorder patients were asked in the first round. For Round 2, 70 responses were derived from the answers, and panelists were asked to rate each item on a Likert-based scale. Conclusions Seventeen of the 24 participants completed all three rounds of the study. For 63% of the items, while 18. 5% reached near consensus and 18. 5% did not reach agreement after Round 3. The panel also identified common challenges in assessing compulsive exercise in eating disorder patients, notably a lack of consensus that is still apparent in the literature.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-022-00641-7


Paper 2: a systematic review of narrative therapy treatment outcomes for eating disorders—bridging the divide between practice-based evidence and evidence-based practice

Background Narrative therapy has been designed to have practice-based evidence, but no further information has been published about its research findings in the treatment of eating disorders. The aim of this research was to conduct a systematic review of narrative therapy for eating disorders in the aftermath literature. Following systematic search of five data bases, method treatment outcomes were extracted from 33 eligible included studies. With a trend toward under-reporting shifts in ED symptoms, the most commonly reported treatment success was in connection with shifts in identity narratives and improved personal agency. Conclusions This systematic review found little support for narrative therapy in the treatment of eating disorders through research-based evidence in clinician papers and transcripts of therapy sessions. Less is known about narrative therapy's systemic medical findings. Reports of findings and Conclusions There is a need to fill this gap in order to know the effectiveness of narrative therapy in the treatment of EDs in the treatment of EDs by a systematic approach. In doing so, the narrative therapy evidence base's research arm will be more fully understood. Narrative therapy has been identified as a promising therapy for eating disorders. However, the treatment results of narrative therapy for eating disorders are under scrutiny. This systematic review of the literature has revealed limited support for narrative therapy based on practice-based studies in clinician papers and transcripts of therapy sessions. This will fill a research gap in narrative therapy for eating disorders.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-022-00636-4


Research in eating disorders: the misunderstanding of supposing serious mental illnesses as a niche specialty

Purpose: Eating disorders are medical disorders with severe consequences and high mortality rates. EDs' research on EDs is receiving less funding than studies on EDs in other fields of psychiatry, possibly slowing treatment progress. This report sought to assess the connection between EDs and schizophrenia; number and type of journals; geographic coverage of top-ten publishing countries; and journal distribution of scientific research and collaborations; funded research and collaborations. Methods We used the Scopus database first, then we integrated the Bibliometrix R-package software with the web interface app Biblioshiny. Only 50% of top-cited papers focused on EDs and a small pool of journals available for ED study had focused on EDs; a smaller pool of journals devoted to EDs also dropped; journals publishing on EDs had a lower rank than those published in schizophrenia; only half of top-cited papers focused on EDs and a smaller pool of journals available for ED study emerged; journals publishing EDs had an overall lower rank than the schizophrenia field. Schizophrenia research was more widely distributed and better funded, according to others, a similar collaboration index was found between the disciplines.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40519-022-01473-9


Paper 1: a systematic synthesis of narrative therapy treatment components for the treatment of eating disorders

Background / Background There are currently a number of eating disorder treatment therapies that use a scientific evidence base to back up their effectiveness. This research sought to perform a narrative review of the literature in order to discover the content and use of narrative therapy in the treatment of EDs. Narrative therapy solutions for EDs included the following elements: the narrative worldview; unpacking the problem story; finding, thickening the meaning and success of stories obscured by the problem story; and safety considerations. Conclusion This narrative synthesis found that narrative practitioners use a variety of narrative therapy strategies when working with people with a lived ED experience. Specific narrative therapy strategies used in ED treatments have been emphasized in the new literature, with some aspects of the narrative worldview and safety concerns unanswered in ED studies. Additional research is required to investigate how identity shifts in narrative therapy are implemented and result in measurable behavioral improvements, as well as how safety considerations can be developed within the narrative worldview. Plain English summary There are a few psychological treatments for eating disorders that have scientific support. Narrative therapy is intended to involve the individual in discovering identities that have been problematic for problem-saturated identities and in the execution of these obscure identities. In this review, we have investigated narrative therapy for eating disorders in order to determine which aspects of this therapy are currently being used and which are less related in the literature.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-022-00635-5


Sociocultural drivers of body image and eating disorder risk in rural Nicaraguan women

Objective Technological and economic globalisation has been cited as a cause of increasing body dissatisfaction and eating disorders worldwide, particularly regarding the effects of mass media on internalized body ideals. Method/results: Women in 62 Creole and Mestizo women living in communities at differing stages of technological progress on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua Method/results In study 1, women used 3D avatar software to develop their own u2018ideal u2019 body in a series of aspects of body ideals, body image, socioeconomic values, and eating habits. Women in Study 2 completed questionnaires of variables related to the sociocultural model of eating disorder risk. Body dissatisfaction as a result of the association between sociocultural body ideals and pathological eating habits, as expected. Body dissatisfaction with pathological eating habits changed over time, as well as socioeconomic factors, body image, and eating preferences at 2 or three timepoints per woman. Although women in these cultures hold higher body weight goals and greater body appreciation than Western women, those women who are internalizing globalized cultural messages about appearance are at a greater risk of body dissatisfaction and, in turn, an increased risk of eating disorders. These results show that cultural messages about appearance have implication on body image and eating disorder risk in populations that do not have a long history of preaching thin ideals.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-022-00656-0


The association between sport nutrition knowledge, nutritional intake, energy availability, and training characteristics with the risk of an eating disorder amongst highly trained competitive road cyclists

Purpose: Objective Objectives: To determine the relationship between sport nutrition education, nutritional intake, energy sources, and training characteristics can be correlated with a eating disorder among highly trained competitive cyclists. The cyclists completed the sports nutrition knowledge questionnaire and brief eating disorder in athletes' questionnaire before submitting a three-day food diary to record energy and macronutrient intake and determine energy availability. SNKQ and BEDA-Q shared a large, negative correlation, meaning that for every correct answer on the SNKQ, the BEDA-Q's score decreased by 0. 3 AU. Conclusion The results reveal that sport nutrition and energy intake was insufficient to meet their training needs on training days, according to the authors. Many highly trained cyclists with less experience in sports nutrition may be at a greater risk of an eating disorder, according to a large, negative correlation between SNKQ and BEDA-Q.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11332-022-01003-1


Eating disorders and palliative care specialists require definitional consensus and clinical guidance regarding terminal anorexia nervosa: addressing concerns and moving forward

Anorexia nervosa patients have been estimated to die in 52% of patients with anorexia nervosa by 2013. Some patients with severe and persistent anorexia nervosa will die as a result of hunger or suicide, among them. We recently published four clinical characteristics of the tiny group of SE-AN patients with terminal eating disorder that may be consistent with general medical literature on terminal illness and based on the authors' U2019 work with patients at this stage of life. The objectives of this paper are to respond to the key points of worry surrounding these patients and their families's health, as well as suggest ways in which the eating disorder and palliative care fields could develop more specific and consensus guidelines for the identification and management of these patients. Conclusions We're refining our terminal AN review by adding to our topic's debate, we want to encourage eating disorders and palliative care specialists to produce expert consensus definitions for terminal AN and expert guidance for management of this population. Patients with this subcategory of SE-AN, their families, and caregivers of end-of-life issues may be better able to access palliative and hospice care as a distinct component of life by validating terminal AN as a distinct entity.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-022-00659-x


Psychiatric and medical comorbidities of eating disorders: findings from a rapid review of the literature

The mortality rate of eating disorders is also elevated compared to other psychiatric disorders, primarily due to medical difficulties and suicide. Further, people with eating disorders often fit the diagnostic criteria for at least one comorbid psychological or medical disorder, implying that the individual suffers simultaneously from both an ED and at least one other disorder. The Rapid Review syntheses the existing evidence base and identifies gaps in eating disorder research and care. EDs and medical comorbidities, some of which precede the eating disorder, may appear alongside or as a result of the eating disorder, according to the report. Background Eating disorders can be very severe, complicated, and life-threatening diseases. Methods This paper is part of a rapid review series focusing on the evidence base for EDs, which was designed to inform the Australian National Eating Disorders Research and Translation Strategy 2021–2031, which was funded and released by the Australian Government and funded by the Australian Government. For EDs in general, the most common psychiatric disorders were fear up to 62%, mood up to 54%, and medication use and post-traumatic stress syndromes increased to 27 percent. People with EDs had higher psychiatric and medical comorbidity rates, which contributed to increased ED symptom onset, adherence to some ED habits, and poorer functioning as well as treatment results. Psychiatric and medical comorbidities in people with an ED early detection and treatment may improve patient response and overall outcomes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-022-00654-2

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions