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Eating Disorder - Crossref

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Last Updated: 13 August 2022

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Substance Use Disorders, Personality Disorders, and Eating Disorders

Abstract Alcohol and other drug use disorders are a major concern for all age groups and ethnic, socioeconomic, and racial groups. Despite high lifetime incidence, only about 10% of people with substance use disorders are eligible for therapy. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are two common eating disorders. Eating disorders are increasingly prevalent in all income, racial, and ethnic groups. Of all psychiatric disorders, eating disorders have the most lethality.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190938369.003.0072


Chapter 17 Eating Disorders and Self-Silencing: A Function-Focused Approach to Treatment

The authors proposed a model that integrates etiological theories, self-silencing, and eating disorder habits, arguing that eating disorder problems are related to emotion processing and control of emotions, and that these habits strengthen and perpetuate the self-silencing model through a negative feedback loop. [Q2] The authors suggest that women who are unable to express an authentic self through words may use their bodies to mask emotional pain.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195398090.003.0019


Integrative Approaches to the Prevention of Eating Disorders and Obesity in Youth

Abstract Abstract: Both eating disorders and obesity are significant public health issues. However, several questions have been raised regarding the correct approach to the prevention of both eating disorders and obesity. This chapter discusses controversy in the prevention of eating disorders and obesity, including potential iatrogenic consequences of prevention and whether interventions should be carried out at the level of public policy. According to previous studies, the chapter continues with a brief overview of some of the most effective strategies for the integrated prevention of both obesity and eating disorders.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195396423.013.0015


Eating Disorders in Sport

Abstract This chapter discusses eating disorders among male and female athletes. The prevalence of clinical and subcutaneous EDs and related disorders are shown, as well as factors within the sport environment associated with pathogenic eating and weight control habits, including performance requirements, sport type, national level, and instructor/peer influences are discussed. The chapter concludes with suggestions for preventing unhealthy eating and weight control habits, as well as questions regarding identifying and treating EDs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199731763.013.0034


Scientific Understanding of Eating Disorder

Abstract This chapter discusses the chemical origins of eating disorders and discusses whether eating disorders are a form of addiction. In addition, although there is abundant evidence that physical disorders are related to eating disorders, diet disorders are also linked to eating disorders, changes are generally corrected as abnormal eating habits are abandoned. This has significant ethical implications: it cannot be claimed that eating disorders are triggered by organic causes or that organic disorders diminish the sufferers'u2019 autonomy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/0199269742.003.0005


Eating Disorders: Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa

Abstract This chapter uses case histories to illustrate the truth of eating disorders and includes a detailed medical description of the condition. It addresses body image deformation, which is believed to have a huge effect on eating disorder sufferers. Both family and social issues related to eating disorders are also included. This chapter also discusses ethical concerns regarding eating disorder care and care of people with eating disorders.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/0199269742.003.0002


A Critique of the Systemic and Sociological Approaches to Eating Disorders

This chapter provides a review of systemic and sociological approaches to eating disorders. Mental disorders are adaptations to illogic and deviant relational models, according to the basic assumption of these methods. In the second chapter, they typically say that the variables in the family or society can cause or explain eating disorders, while the others' assertion is that the variables that are not identified in the models can help with the recognition of what the individual feels and experiences, but cannot cause or explain eating disorders.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/0199269742.003.0011


Victims or Persecutors? The Moral Logic at the Heart of Eating Disorders

Abstract This chapter provides a critical review of family studies of eating disorders. These studies leave important questions unanswered: why do people die when significant others have a skewed opinion of them? If it is true that people use eating disorders to gain control of the family's environment, what leads them to believe that eating habits may be a tool of control. What explains eating disorders isn't inappropriate hopes, but a moral rigor, a way of thinking about interpersonal relationships in moral terms, according to the report.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/0199269742.003.0010


Autonomy and Control in Eating Disorders

This chapter explores whether eating disordered behavior is autonomous. According to example, eating disordered behaviour is exacerbated by several factors in autonomy, including deficiencies in appetite and satiety, failures in the ability to apply knowledge about food to self, and misinformation related to food and its assimilation. This chapter shows that certain aspects specific to eating disorders weaken the platitudes of paternalism.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/0199269742.003.0013


Understanding Eating Disorders

Abstract Introduction Understanding Eating Disorders is an original contribution to the field of healthcare ethics. Obese eating is not a psychopathological disorder, but a systematic reinforcement of common moral values in Western culture, according to Giordano. The book also includes a comprehensive review of UK legislation, as well as a timely review of the legislation concerning mental disorders in general and eating disorders in particular.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/0199269742.001.0001

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions