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Dysphagia - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 13 September 2022

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Postoperative Dysphagia Aortica: Comparison with Other Dysphagia

Dysphagia can be classified as oropharyngeal or esophageal, and functional or structural deficiencies of the esophagus can cause esophageal dysphagia. Dysphagia aortica is described as dysphagia caused by extrinsic compression of the esophagus by the aorta. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of DA by comparing the results of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies with those of other dysphagia. Patients with PDA had higher FDS scores than SSD and lower scores than those with SSD and lower scores than those with DBI on thin liquids, but fibrous liquids had lower FDS scores than those with DACDF or DACDF. Patients with PDA had longer ETT than those with PDA than the other three groups. Although PDA has oropharyngeal signs, the esophageal phase was mainly affected by PDA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10370-9


Pediatric Medullary Stroke, Severe Dysphagia, and Multimodal Intervention

Lateral medullary syndrome/Wallenberg syndrome is a stroke in the lateral medulla with signs including dysphagia and dysphonia. This stroke in adults is the most common brainstem stroke in adults, but it is extremely unusual in the pediatric population. Insults to the medulla can include the u201cswallowing centers, u201d the nucleus ambiguus and nucleus tractus solitarius, as well as the cranial nerves involved in swallowing, namely IX and X. These people can have severe dysphagia as a result of pharyngeal inability and improper muscular opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, causing aspiration. We present a 7-year-old male with 22q11. 2 deletion syndrome and velopharyngeal insufficiency who underwent pharyngeal flap surgery at a hospital outside of the hospital whose post-operative course was complicated by adenovirus, viral myocarditis, and a dorsal medullary stroke. With the entire bolus remaining in the pyriform sinuses resulting in aspiration, his first VFSS revealed a missing UES opening in the pyriform sinuses resulting in aspiration.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10376-3


European Survey: Dysphagia Management in Patients with Neuromuscular Diseases

Dysphagia is a common disease in patients with neuromuscular disorders. This paper was designed to outline current management of dysphagia in NMDs around Europe. The survey was carried out to European healthcare facilities that provide treatment for NMDs. Respondents identified subpoenas in dysphagia management. At least half of the facilities' protocols were found for at least one of the three leadership stages, though only 39% had one for all. Speech and language therapists were listed as involved throughout the entire process of leadership development, though other members of multidisciplinary teams varied depending on the situation. The most commonly used instrument in diagnostic and treatment stages was a clinical swallowing assessment. In conclusion, the survey revealed that there is no such policy regarding dysphagia care in most of the surveyed healthcare facilities.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10392-3


The Status of Dysphagia Clinics During the COVID-19 Pandemic

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the aim of the study was to determine the status of dysphagia clinics and procedures used in dysphagia clinics. During the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, the number of patients and dysphagia testings decreased. Temperature check, nasopharyngeal swab test, anamnestic risk assessment, and a saturation test were all commonly used in COVID-19 screening procedures prior to dysphagia testing. For dysphagia analysis, surgical mask, FFP3 mask, standard gloves, glasses, and face shield were all used, with safety equipment being mainly used. 69. 6% of the dysphagia clinics were found to be safe for working under pandemic conditions, and 30. 4% were considered unsuitable. The usage of tele-health services has soared from 13. 0% to 52. 2%. During the COVID-19 pandemic period, the present paper gives a broad overview of the status of dysphagia clinics and procedures used in dysphagia clinics.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10386-1


Handgrip strength predicts early postoperative dysphagia after thoracoscopic–laparoscopic esophagectomy in male patients with esophageal cancer

In geriatric non-cancer populations, the relationship between sarcopenia and dysphagia has received attention. After esophagectomy, this research sought to determine the links between sarcopenia variables and early postoperative dysphagia. Methods This is a descriptive survey of 201 consecutive male patients undergoing thoracoscopic (u2013laparoscopic esophageal cancer treatment between October 2018 and December 2020. In addition, low HGS was also associated with silent aspiration among patients with aspiration. After TLE, low HGS was strongly associated with early postoperative aspiration and reduction of airway protective reflexes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10388-022-00925-6


Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Italian Version of the Dysphagia Handicap Index (I-DHI)

The Dysphagia Handicap Index is a reliable Health-related Quality of Life questionnaire used by physicians with oropharyngeal dysphagia of heterogeneous etiologies. Testing Spearman's relationships among I-DHI subscales was conducted to determine construct validity among patients with different instrumentally assessed and self-rated OD severity, comparing patients and healthy participants and testing Spearman'u2019s correlations among I-DHI subscales. Patients with more robust instrumentally or self-assessed OD reported higher I-DHI scores p 65 years, with moderate to good correlations emerging among I-DHI subscales; patients with more robust instrumentally or self-assessed OD reported higher I-DHI scores p 65 years. The I-DHI, according to In conclusion, is a reliable and valid HRQOL instrument for Italian adults with OD.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10369-2


Diagnosis of Sarcopenic Dysphagia in the Elderly: Critical Review and Future Perspectives

Sarcopenic dysphagia is a chronic disease of generalized muscle weakness and swallowingu2010related muscles. The aim of this study is to critically examine the techniques used to diagnose sarcopenic dysphagia in the elderly. The diagnostic tools used to make a diagnosis of u201csarcopenic dysphagiau201d were qualitatively reviewed and compared to the established diagnostic criteria for SD and other commonly used measures. The food intake scale was the most commonly used device for dysphagia and/or swallowing disorders, followed by the functional oral intake scale. In 2 of the 14 included SD studies, the 100-mL water swallow test was used in two of the 14 included SD studies. In only one SD study, fiberoptic endoscopic assessment of swallowing, videofluoroscopic swallowing research, EAT-10 questionnaire, and standardized swallow testing were all used.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10371-8


An Evaluation of Texture-Modified Diets Compliant with the International Dysphagia Diet Standardization Initiative in Aged-Care Facilities Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research

Texture-modified diets are often used for older adults with swallowing difficulties in order to improve swallowing efficiency. This observational mixed-method research used the consolidated framework for implementation research to establish the barriers and enablers to IDDSI adoption in aged care facilities. Five New Zealand ACFs were recruited after they had adopted IDDSI >12 months ago. All facility and kitchen managers were IDDSI compliant and had access to online resources.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10393-2


Oral Feeding in Infants After Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Repair While on Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation: The Impact of a Dysphagia Provider-Led Protocol

paraphragmatic hernia infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia that nec necessitate non-invasive positive pressure ventilation or high-flow nasal cannula are at risk of aspiration and delayed introduction of oral feeding. We developed a dysphagia provider-led program that needed early consultation with an occupational therapist or speech/language pathologist, as well as a updated barium swallow study to determine for non-invasive positive pressure ventilation readiness for oral feeding start/advancement on non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. Using Fischer's exact test and Mannu2013Whitney's questionnaire, we discuss the protocol's development and implementation, the intervention cohort's MBSS findings, and comparing the control and intervention cohorts. At the time of oral feeding initiation, the intervention cohort had no-invasive positive pressure ventilation or high flow nasal cannula. Infants in the control group began oral feeds shortly after extubation and attained full oral feeds earlier than the intervention group.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10391-4


Six-Year Follow-Up of Dysphagia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

The current study sought to explore longitudinal changes of dysphagia in Parkinson's disease, discover predictors of dysphagia, and elucidate the impact of dysphagia on other signs in Parkinson's disease patients. For comparative analysis of patients with/without dysphagia and longitudinal data analysis, we used t-tests or Wilcoxon procedures. We used Spearman's correlation analysis to investigate predictors of dysphagia progression, as well as the Wilcoxon test to compare neuropsychological insults between patients with/without dysphagia at baseline. Dyphagia was more likely to get aggravated in male patients than in female patients, according to Spearman's correlation results. Patients with dysphagia at baseline had a significant rise in anxiety scores, compared to patients without dysphagia at baseline. The findings showed that male sex and cognitive impairment predicted worsening dysphagia in Parkinson's disease patients and then suggested that dysphagia may have a negative effect on Parkinson's disease patients, as well as Parkinson's disease patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-021-10387-0

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions