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Dysphagia - MedlinePlus Genetics

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Last Updated: 13 September 2022

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Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder that starts in adulthood, most commonly after age 40. Ptosis can deteriorate over time, causing the eyelid to blur vision, and in some cases, reduce eye movement. Dysphagia starts with dry food, but liquids will become more difficult to swallow as time goes. Many people with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy have weakness and tongue wasting. These food deficiencies may result in hunger, choking, or a bacterial lung disease called aspiration pneumonia. Individuals with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy have muscle weakness in the muscles near the center of the body's bones, especially muscles in the shoulders, upper legs, and hips. People with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (muscle weakness) that starts before age 45, and have trouble walking independently by age 60.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/oculopharyngeal-muscular-dystrophy


Potocki-Lupski syndrome

Potocki-Lupski syndrome is a disorder that results from an extra copy of a small piece of chromosome 17 in each cell. Infants with Potocki-Lupski syndrome may have a poor muscle tone and swallowing difficulties that lead to feeding difficulties. A heart defect in some cases is life-threatening, making up 40% of babies with Potocki-Lupski syndrome. Infants and children with Potocki-Lupski syndrome have delayed growth, including delayed speech and language skills, and gross motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking, among other things. Many people with autism spectrum disorder have symptoms of autism spectrum disorder, which affects social integration and communication. Vision and hearing loss, dental and skeletal abnormalities, and abnormal kidney growth and function can all be associated with Potocki-Lupski syndrome.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/potocki-lupski-syndrome


Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive disease that affects motor neurons, which are specialized nerve cells that regulate muscle movement. Most people with ALS have a sporadic condition, which means they live in people with no apparent history of the disorder in their family. People with sporadic ALS often first exhibit signs of the disorder in their late fifties or early sixties. A small number of people with ALS, with an estimated ten percent having ALS or a related disorder called frontotemporal dementia, which is a progressive brain disorder that affects personality, behavior, and language. The signs and symptoms of familial ALS typically appear in one's late forties or early fifties. People with familial ALS have symptoms in childhood or teenage years. ALS' first signs and symptoms can be so subtle that they are ignored. Many people with ALS suffer from hunger as a result of decreased food intake due to dysphagia and an increase in their body's energy demands as a result of chronic illness. Muscles become weaker as the disease progresses, and arms and legs begin to appear thinner as muscle tissue atrophies. Individuals with ALS eventually lose muscle endurance and walking skills. ALS survivors die within 2 to ten years after the signs and symptoms of ALS first appeared, but disease progression differs among affected individuals. FTD accounts for about 20% of people with ALS.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis


Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

Charlevoix-Say, also known as ARSACS, is a condition that affects muscle mobility and muscle mobility. Those with ARSACS have abnormally low muscle tensing, balance, and coordination issues, as well as decreased sensation and leg weakness. Muscle cramps, involuntary eye movements, and difficulty swallowing and speaking are all typical muscle disorders that can arise in ARSACS. The first sign of ARSACS is unsteady walking style. As toddlers are learning to walk, walking problems generally begin between the ages of 12 months and 18 months. Most of the patients who are in their thirties or forties need wheelchair assistance by the time they are in their thirties or forties. ARSACS has been reported in individuals around the world, although this condition was not named after the region in which it was first seen, the Charlevoix-Say area of Quebec, Canada, has been confirmed in individuals around the world.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/autosomal-recessive-spastic-ataxia-of-charlevoix-saguenay


Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration

Affected people have a buildup of iron in the brain that can be seen with medical imaging. BPAN is a disorder of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation that is characterized as a neurodegenerative disease with brain iron accumulation, but iron accumulation may not begin until late in the disease. Many people with BPAN have recurrent seizures that have arisen in infancy or early childhood. Short lapses in awareness that can lead to staring spells or daydreaming, sudden episodes of poor muscle tone, voluntary muscle twitches, or more pronounced movements such as epileptic spasms are all typical problems that can occur in this disorder. Some people have seizure disorders that mimic epileptic syndromes, such as West syndrome or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Children with BPAN also have intellectual impairment, delayed growth with significant vocabulary and producing speech, as well as difficulties in coordinating movements. Ataxia can impair the ability to walk and develop fine motor skills such as using utensils. Affected people can have behavior changes that are often similar to those of a disorder called Rett syndrome. Individuals with BPAN may begin to experience a gradual loss of intellectual function in late adolescence or early adulthood, which may lead to a dramatic lack of reasoning and reasoning skills. BPAN's lifespan Individuals with BPAN differed. Dementia can be exacerbated by dementia or mobility difficulties, such as falls or swallowing difficulties that can lead to a bacterial lung disease called aspiration pneumonia.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/beta-propeller-protein-associated-neurodegeneration


1p36 deletion syndrome

1p36 deletion syndrome is a disorder that causes significant intellectual impairment in children. Those affected individuals have poor muscle tone and swallowing difficulties. People with 1p36 deletion syndrome have a small head that is also very short and wide in proportion to its size. Vision or hearing problems may exist among people with 1p36 deletion syndrome.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/1p36-deletion-syndrome


KCNK9 imprinting syndrome

Imprinting syndrome in KCNK9 is a rare disorder characterized by low muscle tone from birth. Food allergies, physical insensitivity, and a poor ability to suck can cause feeding difficulties, which can lead to an inability to grow and gain weight. Difficulty swallowing often persists into adolescence. Although muscle tone may improve with time, affected individuals typically have some degree of discomfort into adulthood. The inability could result in permanently bent joints and abnormal spine curvature. Intellectual impairment and a delayed development of speech and motor skills, such as sitting and walking, are both associated with the KCNK9 imprinting syndrome. Many people with limited speech throughout life are unfortunate. Some of the patients have an opening in the roof of the mouth. Some people with KCNK9 imprinting syndrome have a long neck, narrow chest, and tapered fingers, in addition to unusual facial features.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/kcnk9-imprinting-syndrome


PURA syndrome

PURA syndrome is a disorder that is characterized by intellectual impairment as well as delayed learning of speech and motor skills, such as walking. Expressive language skills are generally more noticeable than receptive language skills, and the majority of those affected individuals are unable to speak. People with PURA syndrome may be able to walk later than their peers; others are unable to walk; people with PURA syndrome may be able to walk. Those with swallowing difficulties can persist throughout life. These breathing difficulties do not usually appear after age 1. Recurrent seizures are also common in PURA syndrome. Seizures usually begin before age 5 with uncontrolled muscle jerks. seizures are often impossible to handle in people with PURA syndrome. abnormalities in people with PURA syndrome include abnormalities of the heart, eyes, urogenital tract, gastrointestinal tract, and skeleton. Some people with symptoms of a hormonal disorder, such as early sexual growth or low vitamin D levels, are among those affected individuals.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/pura-syndrome


TUBB4A-related leukodystrophy

The leukodystrophy disorder that affects the nervous system is a condition that affects the nervous system. Myelin insulates nerve fibers and promotes rapid nerve transmission. Myelin may also break down in some affected individuals, causing demyelination. People with TUBB4A -related leukodystrophy have various signs and symptoms. Researchers now group all of these cases of leukodystrophy, which have the same genetic cause, as TUBB4A-related leukodystrophy. Hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum is the most apparent on the TUBB4A-related leukodystrophy spectrum. In other situations, motor skills develop normally and then are lost in early childhood. In addition, people with H-ABC also have other mobility disorders, such as voluntary muscle contractions, uncontrolled movements of the limbs, muscle cramps, and difficulty coordinating movements. Atrophy of brain tissue in another area involved in mobility, called the cerebellum, is typical, but the cerebrum, which controls most voluntary participation, language, sensory perception, and memory, may also be affected. The differences in other people with TUBB4A -related leukodystrophy are largely in between these two groups. Individuals affected by the basal ganglia or other brain regions may have varying degrees of hypomyelination and atrophy or impairment of the basal ganglia or other brain regions. As the lower limbs' symptoms continue to deteriorat, a small group of individuals is affected by muscle cramps and paralysis. In addition, these individuals may have mild hypomyelination and ataxia without having the other mobility or learning difficulties typical in H-ABC.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/tubb4a-related-leukodystrophy

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions