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Dietary supplement - PubMed

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Last Updated: 04 May 2022

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Healthcare Professionals' Knowledge and Behaviors Regarding Drug-Dietary Supplement and Drug-Herbal Product Interactions.

Given the widespread use of nutritional supplements and herbal products, healthcare practitioners will increasingly encounter patients who use these preparations with conventional drugs and who need their assistance to minimize adverse therapeutic outcomes. The HCPs were mostly familiar with the chemical interactions with magnesium and were least familiar with the chemical interactions of warfarin with glucosamine. GPs scored significantly higher than nurses, according to the findings on DDSIs and DHPIs knowledge, while specialty doctors scored significantly higher than nurses only on DDSIs knowledge. Only 28% of respondents said that they often or often ask patients about drug use in the use of DS or HP, and 25% of respondents report such information in patient medical records. Our findings revealed that HCPs have sufficient information about most common DDSIs and DHPIs, but that there are no such interactions for most moderate interactions.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074290


Dietary Supplement Use during Pregnancy: Perceptions versus Reality.

This research sought to investigate the prevalence, associated factors, and perceptions of dietary supplement use among pregnant Chinese women. Through a face-to-face survey using a self-designed questionnaire, a cross-sectional research was conducted to gather data about the prevalence, purchase channels, perceptions, and other causes of dietary supplement use among 572 pregnant women. According to a multivariate analysis, pregnant women who had used multiple supplements were more likely to have a longer gestational age, received fertility enhancement, more prenatal visits, and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. During pregnancy, there was a high prevalence of dietary supplement use, as well as extensive and repeated intake of nutrients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074063


Demographics of Dietary Supplement Use for Skin: An Analysis of NHANES Cross-Sectional Data.

Dietary supplement use is widespread, with the usage of over half of Americans adults reported to be high. This cross-sectional analysis used 2015– 2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey results. The overwhelming percentage of those reporting skin supplement use had health insurance and some college education or above. This report helps identify demographic groups that are more likely to consume skin, hair, and nail supplements. Overall, physicians should educate their patients on dietary supplements to minimize drug-supplement interactions and identify the reasons that influence the use of over-the-counter skin supplements. paradermatol. J Drugs Dermatol Dermatol.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.36849/JDD.5744


Age Drives the Differences in Dietary Supplement Use in Endurance Athletes: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Cyclists, Runners, and Triathletes.

Most athletes use diet supplements to enhance health and fitness levels that cannot be achieved by diet alone. Senior athletes facing age-related declines are particularly vulnerable to health and fitness gains made by the use of DS. Nevertheless, there are few DS shown to boost endurance and stability, and the prevalence of DS in OA is uncertain. Overall, 78. 0% of athletes reported new DS use. With ages 40-49 and 50-59 using more DS than younger athletes, as well as those aged 18-29 and 30-39, more resembled DS than younger ones. Age was the sole predictor of total DS use, with OA using 3 DS more than younger compared to younger. On a more competitive basis, thriving DS strategies require further investigation into the benefits and dangers of DS to determine safe, targeted, and age-specific DS policies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2022.2056670


Effect of Phosphate Binders and a Dietary Iron Supplement on the Pharmacokinetics of a Single Dose of Vadadustat in Healthy Adults.

Valiantustat, a hypoxia-inducible factor that is responsible for the treatment of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, is a hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitor. In healthy adult participants, two studies investigating the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of a single oral dose of vadadustat coadministered with a phosphate binder or iron supplement were conducted. In the study, ten healthy men were given vadadustat alone and concomitantly with the oral iron supplement ferrous sulfate. The ratios for area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity were reduced by 37% to 55% by phosphate binders and 46% by ferrous sulfate, with time 0 to infinity. However, 90% confidence intervals for vadadustat exposure were within the no-effect boundaries of +51% to -33%, indicating that drug-drug interactions can be minimized by administering vadadustat 1 hour before phosphate binders were reduced by 10% to 3. 3 percent.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1002/cpdd.1033

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions