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Dietary supplement - Astrophysics Data System

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Last Updated: 04 May 2022

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A systematic review: Role of dietary supplements on markers of exercise-associated gut damage and permeability

This systematic review sought to determine the effect of diet supplements on markers of exercise-induced gut endothelial cell damage and/or permeability. Studies were conducted to determine indirect markers of gut endothelial cell damage and permeability in response to exercise with and without a prescribed supplement, as well as without water. Compared to placebo conditions, the majority of studies using bovine colostrum and glutamine showed a decrease in key indicators of gut cell damage and permeability. While exercising and recovering euhydration can partially reduce gut damage and permeability, but other performance nutritional plans must comply. Some promising findings were reported by single strain probiotic strains, but the results are likely to be strain, dose, and duration specific. In spite of the large heterogeneity among the chosen studies, appropriate implementation of different diet plans may help with the first phases of gastrointestinal cell disruptions in athletes related to exercise.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022PLoSO..1766379C/abstract


Improvement of Feed Efficiency in Pigs through Microbial Modulation via Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Sows and Dietary Supplementation of Inulin in Offspring

Modification of the intestinal microbiome may be more beneficial in raising FE in pigs as previous studies show there is a correlation between microbiota and FE. The FMTp in gestating sows, alone or in combination with postweaning dietary inulin supplementation in offspring, resulted in an elevated relative abundance of intestinal bacteria associated with fiber degradation and a reduced relative abundance of potential pathogens in gestating sows. ABSTRACT As previous research has shown a correlation between the porcine intestinal microbiome and feed quality, a microbiota manipulation may be a way to raise FE in pigs. According to the FMTp and/or inulin supplementation, relative amounts of potential pathogens in the ileum and cecal levels of butyric acid were much lower. In offspring, the maternal FMTp caused an increase in the number of jejunal goblet cells. Inulin supplementation alone did not influence growth or FE, but increased the mean platelet volume, but reduced ileal propionic acid concentrations, granulocyte counts, and serum urea concentrations. Overall, the FMTp in pregnant sows, whether or not they were supplemented with dietary inulin supplementation in offspring, has positively modulated offspring intestinal microbiota and related physiological characteristics. Importance As previous studies shows a correlation between microbiota and FE, modulation of the intestinal microbiome may be helpful in improving FE in pigs. Additional research based on the results from this research may also identify specific dietary supplements for the promotion/maintenance of the microbiota transferred via the maternal FMTp, thus optimizing pig growth and FE.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2019ApEnM..85E1255M/abstract


Dietary Supplementation with Sodium Sulfate Improves Rumen Fermentation, Fiber Digestibility, and the Plasma Metabolome through Modulation of Rumen Bacterial Communities in Steers

Supplementing the steer diet with sodium sulfate significantly improved rumen fermentation, fiber digestibility, and vitamin absorption by effects on the ruminal microbiome, according to the present trial's findings. ABSTRACT Six steers were used to investigate the consequences of sodium sulfate supplementation on rumen fermentation, nutrient digestion, rumen microbiota, and plasma metabolites. Supplementing with Na 2 SO 4 increased the ruminal concentration of total volatile fatty acids, the molar proportions of acetate and butyrate, ruminal concentrations of microbial protein, SO 4 2 -S, and fiber digestibility, while decreasing the molar proportion and the ruminal concentration of ammonia nitrogen, according to the study. By modulating the rumen microbial community, it was found that supplementing the steer ration with Na 2 SO 4 was beneficial to increase the rumen fermentation, fiber digestibility, and nutrient metabolism. However, no information is available about the effects of sulfur on the rumen microbiota and plasma metabolome. Through the influence of the ruminal microbiome, supplementing the steer ration with sodium sulfate significantly increased rumen fermentation, fiber digestibility, and metabolism of amino acids, purine derivatives, and vitamins. The evidence from the present trial established the probable causes of the beneficial effects of sulfur on rumen fermentation and nutrient utilization.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2020ApEnM..86E1412Z/abstract


Changes in the Rumen Microbiota of Cows in Response to Dietary Supplementation with Nitrate, Linseed, and Saponin Alone or in Combination

We hypothesized that linseed and saponins would have an effect on hydrogen makers and nitrate consumption, resulting in reduced methane production in the rumen. Both linseed and nitrate had a deleterious effect on hydrogen producers, according to the onset of nitrate production, whereas nitrate boosted the growth of nitrate-reducing and, therefore, hydrogen-consuming bacterial taxa. This new review of the microbial processes involved in rumen methanogenesis provides insight into the construction and optimization of methane mitigation plans. Eight nonlactating cows were fed linseed or saponin diets in order to reduce hydrogen production and nitrate, affecting hydrogen consumption; in addition, combinations of linseed plus nitrate or saponin were used to determine the relationship between dietary therapies. Inconsistency between the two studies with nitrate supplementation could be due to changes in microbial ecosystem functionality rather than changes in microbial community structure. IMPORTANCE This research was designed to determine the microbial causes of enteric methane reduction in cows fed alone or in combination. We hypothesized that linseed and saponins would affect hydrogen manufacturers and nitrate consumption, resulting in reduced methane production in the rumen. Both linseed and nitrate had a deleterious effect on hydrogen producers; linseed also directed hydrogen production toward propionate production, contrary to what was expected, and hydrogen-consuming bacteria taxa grew.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2019ApEnM..85E2657P/abstract


A molecular insight into the lipid changes of pig Longissimus thoracis muscle following dietary supplementation with functional ingredients

The L diet caused a significant rise in glycerophospholipids and 8 sphingolipids when compared to the CTRL group, while the L diet caused significant rises in glycerolipids and 8 sphingolipids. According to the correlations between discriminant lipids and genes, the L diet may have played an important role in lipid formation and functioning, while the L+P diet promoted the expression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and adipogenic extracellular matrix formation and function.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022PLoSO..1764953R/abstract

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions