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Developmental disability - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 23 September 2022

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Developmental disability among Aboriginal children in Western Australia (WA).

On second, the prevalence of service access was estimated from all National Disability Insurance Scheme WA Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal participants aged 0-17 on 30/6/2021 with a primary diagnosis of ID or autism. In 2021, 3. 6 percent of Aboriginal children were diagnosed with developmental disability in NDIS, but just 0. 7 percent of children with ID without FASD had FASD. Indigenous children were more likely than non-Aboriginal children to be NDIS participants with autism, ID without FASD, and FASD with FASD, according to FASD. Participants with ID had a shorter age distribution than non-Aboriginal participants. Variation in diagnosis by location and Aboriginal status can lead to disparaging diagnosis and treatment, which can lead to delay in diagnosis or access to services for Aboriginal children.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.23889/ijpds.v7i3.1855


Improving our understanding of unmet needs among adults with a developmental disability

And though many are able, willing, and able to work, people with developmental disabilities are the lowest for people with developmental disabilities in comparison to every other disability in Canada. Many that are employed work for less than minimum wage and are under minimum wage or have minimum coverage by labor law. In a Canadian context, no further information is known about the job prospects for people with DD. [1] ASD and CP are two of the most common chronic developmental disorders that result in disability in Canadian children.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/a08387bed75843b2bc92c886af7da5bb


History of Developmental Disability Policy in Alberta

The person with developmental disabilities program, which is responsible for the provision of services and supports to adults with developmental disabilities, is fully investigated by the Alberta government. With a budget deficit of over $1 billion, PDD supports over 12,000 adults to receive home ownership, education, and specialized services from nearly 160 non-profit and for-profit disability service providers to support people live in their communities as inclusively and independently as possible. This paper explores the transformation of policies and services for people with developmental disabilities in Alberta from the beginning of the province in 1905 to the present day. The paper explores how Alberta's developmental disability policies and service models have been influenced by societal shifts in attitudes toward disability as a result of the province's unique socioeconomic and political characteristics.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/4a958b7e22a2490787788f39d99204d3


A picture is worth a thousand words: A proposal to incorporate video into the evaluation of adults with intellectual or developmental disability living outside the home

Around 11% of the population worldwide, there are adults with intellectual or developmental impairments. IDD is a significant risk factor for premature morbidity or mortality. Adults with IDD are also at an elevated risk of neglect or mistreatment, a finding that has been documented in multiple countries and in a variety of health care settings. We recommend including a video in the evaluation of adults with IDD living outside the home to promote person-centered care, improve record-keeping/documentation, and help with safeguarding the health and safety of this vulnerable population.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2022.887714

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions