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Developmental Disability - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 23 July 2022

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Improving our understanding of unmet needs among adults with a developmental disability

Even though many are eager, willing, and able to work, the Labour force is the lowest for persons with developmental disabilities in comparison to any other disability in Canada, even though many are able, willing, and able to work. Many that are employed work for less than minimum wage and have minimum protection by labour law, with minimum guarantees provided. In a Canadian setting, however, no detail is known about the job prospects for people with DD. [1] ASD and CP are two of the most common chronic developmental disorders that result in disability in Canadian children.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/a08387bed75843b2bc92c886af7da5bb


History of Developmental Disability Policy in Alberta

The Persons with Developmental Disabilities program, which is responsible for the provision of services and supports to adults with developmental disabilities, is fully investigated by the Alberta government. With a budget of over $1 billion, PDD services to help individuals live in their communities as inclusively and independently as possible. This paper explores the transition of policy and service responses for people with developmental disabilities in Alberta from the start of the province in 1905 to the present day. The paper provides a historical overview of how Alberta's developmental disability policies and service models have been influenced by cultural shifts in attitudes toward disability, as a result of the province's unique socio-political characteristics.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/4a958b7e22a2490787788f39d99204d3


Community Conversations: Stakeholder-Identified Research Priorities to Foster Community Participation for Individuals With Intellectual and Developmental Disability

We established a diverse patient-centered outcomes research group to prioritize future research priorities and meaningful outcomes for children and youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities and families, which was previously underrepresented in study. To determine future study goals and meaningful outcomes focused on community-level interventions for children and youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities and families, a group that has been underrepresented in study, we created a diverse patient-centered outcomes research community. We discuss the engagement process and procedures for including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities as participants in study design and implementation. Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families' continued engagement in community settings had a desire to be included and feel good about their participation in community settings, and many of our stakeholders wanted to be included and acknowledged that change was underway, but many of our stakeholders did not know or acknowledge that research needs to be improved, including education related to best practices for inclusion and inclusive programming.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fresc.2022.873415


Outcomes and Hand Use of Reaching Attempts: Comparison of Infants at Risk for Developmental Disability and Infants With Typical Development

paraphrasedoutput:Methods and Procedures We studied infants at risk of developmental delay and reaching maturity before reaching maturity, but no one had studied infants with typical developmental delay and children with typical growth. Our findings also provided details to back up early trends in determining typical and atypical developmental trajectories. Implications: Our findings provide evidence to back up early signs of success in determining average and atypical developmental trajectories.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.712252


Improving Our Understanding of Unmet Needs Among Adults with a Developmental Disability

Despite the fact that many are able, eager, and able to work, people with developmental disabilities are among the lowest for people with developmental disabilities in comparison to every other disability in Canada. In a Canadian context, very little information is known about the effects of work for people with DD. This report looked at the unmet employment, education, and daily life needs of people with two types of developmental disability, autism spectrum disorder, and cerebral palsy [1].

Source link: https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.11575/sppp.v10i0.43022


History of Developmental Disability Policy in Alberta

The Persons with Developmental Disabilities program, which is responsible for the provision of services and supports to adults with developmental disabilities, is fully investigated by the Alberta government. PDD supports over 12,000 adults with a budget of over $1 billion, including home living, education, community service, and specialized programs to help people live in their communities as inclusively and independently as possible. From the time of the province's founding in 1905 to the present day, this paper chronicles the evolution of policy and service response for people with developmental disabilities in Alberta. The paper provides an historical overview of how Alberta's developmental disability services and service models have been influenced by cultural shifts in perceptions of disability as a result of the province's unique socio-political features.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/a2cdca4dd94e4f23bcea72132910ac33


Improving our understanding of unmet needs among adults with a developmental disability

And though many are eager, willing, and able to work, the lowest Labour force participation for people with developmental disabilities is lowest among those with developmental disabilities compared to any other disease in Canada. In a Canadian context, no detail is known about the job prospects for people with DD. This investigation looked at the unmet work, education, and daily living requirements of people with two specific types of developmental disability, autism spectrum disorder, and cerebral palsy [1]. [1] ASD and CP are two of the most common chronic medical disorders that result in disability in Canadian children.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/83b953287e104767950924ff3dd5a02f


Promising Practices in the Frontiers of Quality Outcome Measurement for Intellectual and Developmental Disability Services

Supporting people with IDD to live well in their communities is vital, but there are no established guidelines for monitoring quality outcomes related to HCBS. We conclude by recommending what we see as new frontiers for researchers to explore in order to increase the consistency of HCBS outcome measurement for people with IDD in the future.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fresc.2022.871178


Effectiveness and safety of adjunctive cenobamate for focal seizures in adults with developmental disability treated in clinical practice

The use and tolerability of adjunctive cenobamate for uncontrolled focal seizures in adults living with a developmental disorder are not established. While receiving cenobamate, effectiveness was assessed as percentage change in focal seizure frequency per month from the 2-month average before cenobamate to the average of months 5 and 6. Patients with higher response rates in focal seizure frequency at 6 months of cenobamate therapy were investigated. In 48. 2% of patients who continued cenobamate for six months, the responder rate of 100 percent seizure reduction was present in 48. 2% of the patients.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebr.2022.100533


The Use of Smart Technology on Improving Time Management of College Students with Intellectual/Developmental Disability

The aim of this research was to investigate the use of smart technology on time management skills acquisition of students with intellectual/developmental disabilities who enroll in college.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.13021/jipe.2019.2458

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions