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Dispersal - BioProject

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Last Updated: 16 February 2022

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Microbial Stowaways - Historic Wooden Shipwrecks Influence Dispersal of Deep-Sea Biofilms

Biofilm production, maturation, and dispersal on submerged wood provides the opportunity to investigate how wood habitat characteristics influence biogeography processes on the seabed. In the deep sea, the study also examined the effect of wood type on the formation of biofilms.

Source link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/802802


Lions and brown bears colonised North America in multiple synchronous waves of dispersal across the Bering Land Bridge

During the Pleistocene glacial cycles, the Bering Land Bridge connecting North America and Eurasia was occasionally exposed and inundated by fluctuating sea levels. Although these palaeoenvironmental effects have been studied in several large herbivores from Beringia, the Pleistocene population dynamics of the area's diverse community of carnivorans are less well understood due to their lower populations. During Marine Isotope Stage 3, our findings show remarkable synchronicity in Beringian lions and brown bears' population dynamics, with several waves of dispersal across the Bering Land Bridge coinciding with coastal periods of low sea levels, as well as local extinctions in Eastern Beringia. These two taxa in North America underscore the Bering Land Bridge's historical past and importance in the migration, turnover, and maintenance of megafaunal populations.

Source link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/790554


Effect of dispersal by inundation on soil bacterial communities depends on soil developmental stage

We're doing a microcosm experiment to see how soil bacterial populations from various successional stages respond differently in terms of community differentiation and changes in inundation frequency. In the microcosm experiment, artificial sea water delivery was used to simulate four levels of inundation frequency, i. e. In addition, sterile sea water was used as a marker to aid in determining the effect of biotic and abiotic factors in community responses. At 6 time points in a treatment period of 20 days, Soil bacterial populations were characterized by sequencing 16S rRNA genes at 6 time points. Overall, our results revealed that frequency of inundation did not influence temporal turnover in bacterial species diversity and composition of soils from both stages of succession. The impact of inundation to soil bacterial communities primarily occurred as a result of soil physicochemical changes, but not significantly so dispersal, according to studies. Our findings, taken together, reveal that bacterial communities in the early successional stage of salt marsh are both vulnerable to floodation and vulnerable to environmental change. Given that changes in the cellular structure of soil bacterial communities in response to inundation at early successional stages may directly influence soil chemistry, as well as cause cascading, long-term effects on soil erosion, future conservation efforts should place greater emphasis on early stages of soil succession.

Source link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/785221

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions