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Cryptosporidium - Wiley Online Library

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Last Updated: 17 July 2022

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Recent genetic exchanges and admixture shape the genome and population structure of the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum

Cryptosporidium parvum, a globally distributed zooonotic pathogen and a common source of diarrhoeal disease in humans and ruminants, is a common source of diarrhoeal disease in humans and ruminants. Here, we compare 32 whole genome sequences from human u2010 and ruminant u2010 parasite isolates collected across Europe, Egypt, and China. The recombination of ruminant isolates into human isolates is seen in multiple human subtypes of gene flow and population admixture, and the bulk of human nucleotide species are highly enriched in these genetic interactions, resulting in an increase in nucleotide diversity. We discuss how this could be a novel substrate for natural selection at genes involved in host-u2013parasite interactions, potentially altering the dynamic coevolutionary balance in the Red Queens arms race.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mec.16556


Isolation and identification of sporozoite membrane protein of Cryptosporidium parvum and evaluation of calmodulinā€like protein immune protection

20 related proteins were found through the separation and determination of Cryptosporidium parvum's sporozoite membrane protein. Among them, a calmodulin-u2010like protein has a similar functional domainu2010exchange factor hand motif as calmodulin proteins, so it could play a similar role in the invasion process. The C. parvum calmodulin u2010like protein was introduced into a pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli as C. parvum calmodulin, which was encoding the C. parvum calmodulin-u2010like protein. Female BALB/c mice from the University of 2010 was used to investigate the immunosensitivity and immunoprotection of recombinant CpCML against synthetic Cryptosporidium tyzzeri infections. Similarly, immunization with rCpCML resulted in a 33. 8 percent decrease of oocyst shedding in C. tyzzeri infected mice faeces, which was similar to rP23. These findings indicate that CpCML could be developed as a potential vaccine antigen against cryptosporidiosis.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pim.12937

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions