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Cryptosporidium - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 17 July 2022

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Construction of a recombinant food-grade Lactococcus lactis expressing P23 protein of Cryptosporidium parvum

The P23 protein of C. parvum is a protective antigen, and it has been regarded as a potential candidate for developing a safe vaccine against cryptosporidiosis. The assembled plasmid pNZ8149-P23 was transferred by electroporation to Lactococcus lactis NZ3900, and the recombinant L. lactis NZ8149-P23 strain was tested in Elliker-medium by adding bromocresolpurple indicator. After nisin induction in LM17 broth medium, a 23-kDa protein was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, implying that P23 protein was in the form of glycosylation. The immunocompetence of expressed P23 antigen was found through western blot and indirect immunofluorescence analysis, and its location of release to recombinant L. lactis' cell interior was revealed. The first report of a food-grade genetically engineered L. lactis strain with a P23 antigen of C. parvum is herein. This study reveals a novel and safe recycling of P23 against C. parvum infection.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12223-021-00923-8


Genotyping and subtyping of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis isolates from two wild rodent species in Gansu Province, China

Cryptosporidium spp. , a species of Cryptosporidium spp. In humans and animals, Giardia duodenalis are common intestinal protozoa species, contributing to global gastroenteritis transmission. Cryptosporidium spp. CDC epidemiology and zoonotic risk The present research investigated the prevalence and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. In China's Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau district for the first time, marmots and Alashan ground squirrels in Himalayan marmots and Alashan ground squirrels in Himalayan marmots and Alashan ground squirrels were released in Himalayan marmots and Alashan ground squirrels in Himalayan marmots and Alashan ground squirrels in Himalayan marmots and Alashan ground squirrels in the Himalayan marmots in Beijing's Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area for the first time. The majority of 11 and 8 samples were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. Cryptosporidium spp. has been present for as long as a preservative species. According to the survey, Himalayan marmots were 2. 5% and 1. 7 percent in Alashan ground squirrels, respectively. The presence of C. rubeyi, ground squirrel genotype II, chipmunk genotype II, chipmunk genotype II, and horse genotype was confirmed by sequence analysis, which revealed horse genotype V and horse genotype. The horse genotype was further subtyped as novel subtype VIbA10, which was also subtype VIbA10. This is the first attempt to identify Cryptosporidium spp. In Himalayan marmots and Alashan ground squirrels, G. duodenalis, indicating the possibility of zoonotic transmission of the two pathogens in QTPA.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-16196-1


Working toward improved monitoring of Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cysts in water samples: testing alternatives to elution and immunomagnetic separation from USEPA Method 1623.1

Purpose This research was intended to find a way to improve the recovery of Cryptosporidium spp. Paraphrasedoutput: Compared to the results that can be obtained with USEPA Method 1623. 1, parasites from water samples for research purposes are not as effective as those obtained with USEPA Method 1623. 1. Four different methods were used to analyze water samples that had been artificially contaminated with parasites. Method 1623. 1 itself, elution of Method 1623. 1 elution, microfiltration, an elution procedure based on grinding the filter membrane in a blender before the elution was concentrated by immunomagnetic separation, followed by microfiltration.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-022-06118-9


Population genetics of Cryptosporidium parvum subtypes in cattle in Poland: the geographical change of strain prevalence and circulation over time

C. parvum subtypes in cattle were found in cattle and was genetically related. Dynamicity in cattle was demonstrated by the population C. parvum strains circulating in cattle. In Poland, the aim of this study was to investigate the population genetics of C. parvum strains infecting cattle, and identify geographic distribution and time-span correlations in subtype prevalence. Results The overall prevalence of C. parvum in Polish cattle was estimated at 6. 2%. There were no significant differences observed between breed and presence of C. parvum infections in this group, excluding one breed, that of dairy-meat mixed. When the population genetics of C. parvum strains were reviewed, 11 parasite subtypes from the IIa and IId genetic families were identified. The prevalence of C. parvum subtypes in cattle was genetic based. Conclusions The study of the population genetics of C. parvum subtypes revealed that strains from the IIa subtype family predominated in the tested cattle population.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-022-03328-y


Molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species from domestic ruminants and wild reptiles in Cyprus

Four species of cryptosporidium parvum in goats, C. xiaoi, and C. ubiquitum in sheep, C. xiaoi, and C. parvum in lizards have been identified; the viper snake specimen was negative; cryptosporidium parvum in goats, C. xiaoi, and C. parvum in lizards; and C. parvum in lizards; C. var varani In the Republic of Cyprus, this is the first study on the molecular identification of a variety of Cryptosporidium species from domestic ruminants and wild reptiles.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00436-022-07527-2


Outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis in northern Sweden: persisting symptoms in a 5-year follow-up

In 2010-2013, a waterborne epidemic of the parasite Cryptosporidium hominis, killed nearly 27,000 people in the city of u00d6stersund, Sweden, killing nearly 27,000 people. According to previous studies, post-infectious signs, such as digestive problems and joint pain, could persist for up to two years after the initial infection. We investigated whether the parasite caused post-infectious sequelae for up to five years after the outbreak in this research. We investigated whether outbreak cases were more likely than non-cases to reveal post-infectious symptoms five years later. At the sequel, after adjusting for age and sex, outbreak victims were more likely to report watery diarrhoea, swollen legs, abdominal pain, bloating, joint pain, acid indigestion, alternating bowel habits, joint pain, nausea, and exhaustion than in non-case situations. Cryptosporidiosis was mostly associated with gastrointestinal- and joint-infectious post-infectious symptoms for up to 5 years after the infection, according to our reports.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00436-022-07524-5


An update on Cryptosporidium biology and therapeutic avenues

In resource-poor countries, particularly in very young children, Cryptosporidium species has been identified as a common pediatric diarrheal pathogen. New therapeutic avenues have been investigated by several drug research groups, as well as other clinical avenues. Cryptosporidium u2019's unique biology is a challenge to the traditional drug discovery pipeline and necessitates novel drug testing techniques. In a short time, several significant strides have been made in the creation of anti-cryptidium drugs. These are likely to develop into clinical candidates for cryptosporidiosis treatment in the future.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12639-022-01510-5


Are Blastocystis hominis and Cryptosporidium spp. playing a positive role in colorectal cancer risk? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Intestinal protozoa Blastocysten hominis and Cryptosporidium spp. We estimated the pooled incidence and odds ratio of the two parasites in colorectal cancer patients and their potential connection with the deadly disease in the present study. Results Thirteen papers for B. hominis /CRC and six papers for Cryptosporidium spp. /CRC were eligible to include in the data analysis, including six papers for B. hominis /CRC and six papers for Cryptosporidium spp. /CRC were eligible to include in the data synthesis. B. hominis and Cryptosporidium spp. were found in the pooled population of B. hominis and Cryptosporidium spp. In both protozoa and controls, a substantial difference was found between case and controls, according to case-u2013control research. Given the Blastocystis subtypes, ST1 and ST3 had the most reports in CRC patients, it was surprising. Only C. parvum and C. hominis were identified in the Cryptosporidium species. Conclusion Given the widespread prevalence of both parasites in CRC patients and their statistically significant association, it is imperative that you pay more attention to these two intestinal parasites in patients under therapy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13027-022-00447-x

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions