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Cryptosporidium - PubMed

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Last Updated: 17 July 2022

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Molecular detection and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium in kindergarten children in Southern Xinjiang, China.

In kindergarten children in Southern Xinjiang, China, this research was intended to determine the genetic structure and epidemiological status of Cryptosporidium in kindergarten children. A gene encoding a 60-kDa glycoprotein was subtyped for Isolates containing Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis. Using the Maximum Likelihood technique based on the Tamura-Nei model, we used MEGA7 to create a phylogenetic tree to investigate the genetic relationship between these two species's gp60 subtypes of the Tamura-Nei model and the Tamura-Nei model. With a 2. 0% infection rate in boys and a 0. 8 percent infection rate in girls, only 1. 3% of asymptomatic children were reported to have been contaminated with Cryptosporidium, with a 2. 0% incidence in boys and a 0. 6 percent infection rate in girls. Three C. hominis subtypes and two C. parvum subtypes were also discovered, as well as two C. parvum subtypes. In kindergarten children in Southern Xinjiang, China, this is the first to report the presence of Cryptosporidium in kindergarten children. The presence of zoonotic C. parvum subtypes IIdA14G1 and IIdA15G1 in both models indicates a potential cross-species transmission of Cryptosporidium between children and animals.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meegid.2022.105339


Multilocus Sequence Typing helps understand the genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Colombian patients.

Five Cryptosporidium species were identified: C. hominis, C. parvum, Cryptosporidium felis, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, and Cryptosporidium suis. Four allelic families for C. hominis and two for C. parvum were identified in a Unilocus gp60 report, with two for C. hominis and two for C. parvum. Both C. hominis and C. parvum markers were tested for polymorphic activity, particularly with the CP47, MS5, and gp60 markers. In addition, two monophyletic clades clustered the species C. hominis and C. parvum were found, with a greater number of subclades within the monophyletic groups than those with the gp60 gene. Thirteen MLG were identified with C. hominis and eight for C. parvum, with eight of them labelled for C. parvum and eight for C. parvum. In the C. parvum samples, the gene fixation index demonstrated a evolutionary closeness between the C. hominis samples and a less evolutionary closeness and greater sequence divergence.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0270995


Population genetics of Cryptosporidium parvum subtypes in cattle in Poland: the geographical change of strain prevalence and circulation over time.

To help determine the species-specific epidemiology of cattle cryptosporidiosis, Microsatellite typing kits for identifying C. parvum subtypes are now available. This research was conducted in Poland to investigate the prevalence of subtype prevalence in the Polish population and time-span correlations. The 18 small subunit ribosomal RNA locus was identified with C. parvum at the 18 small subunit RNA locus, as well as strain subtyping by GP60-PCR. RESULTS: C. parvum prevalence in Polish cattle was estimated at 6. 2%, according to the CDC's estimates. There were no significant differences between breed and presence of C. parvum infections in this study. When the population genetics of C. parvum strains were determined, 11 parasite subtypes from the IIa and IId genetic families were identified. C. parvum subtypes in cattle were present in cattle, according to breed-related occurrence.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-022-03328-y


Parasitological, Molecular, and Epidemiological Investigation of Cryptosporidium Infection Among Cattle and Buffalo Calves From Assiut Governorate, Upper Egypt: Current Status and Zoonotic Implications.

More information about the epidemiological characteristics and real contributions of various reservoir animals in maintaining the cryptosporidium spp's transmission cycle. This investigation was intended to look at the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. Interestingly, the fecal examination revealed that 33. 5 percent of the animals under observation were infected with Cryptosporidium, including 38. 27% among cattle and 28. 6% among buffalo. Cryptosporidium spp's infection rates are determined by age as an individual variable factor. Female cattle calves were more susceptible to Cryptosporidium infection than males, according to sex, while male buffalo calves had a higher infection rate than females compared to females. According to seasonal variations, Cryptosporidium spp. infection rates are similar to seasonal variations. Among the animals under investigation, there was a higher incidence of Cryptosporidium infection, and it was reported that buffalos and cattle can help maintain the transmission cycle of this zoonotic parasite in Upper Egypt.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2022.899854


A Simple Alcohol-based Method of Oocyst Inactivation for Use in the Development of Detection Assays for Cryptosporidium.

Cryptosporidium spp. is a spp. The objective of this study was to determine methods of inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocysts that can be used in the lab and determine the effectiveness of whole inactive oocysts in quantitative PCR. Experiments were carried out on C. parvum oocysts exposed to heat or treated with increasing amounts of ethanol and methanol over time. Even though significant PI incorporation was observed, excystation of sporozoites was not impaired with 24 h exposures of oocysts to 50% ethanol or methanol. Moreover, non-working oocysts used specifically in qPCR assays of the COWP gene were also useful reference reagents for the detection and quantification of Cryptosporidium in spiked water samples. In summary, we have found a cost-effective way to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in a laboratory that is suitable for the design of detection or diagnostic assays targeting the parasite.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fawpar.2022.e00163


Sympatric Recombination in Zoonotic Cryptosporidium Leads to Emergence of Populations with Modified Host Preference.

Here, we tested the possibility that recombination among sympatric ancestral populations resulted in the emergence of divergent variants of the zoonotic parasite Cryptosporidium parvum with modified host ranges. Subpopulation selection may be influenced by gene mutations, while copy number variations of genes encoding invasion-associated proteins may be potentially associated with modified host ranges. These results reveal the ances of zoonotic C. parvum and suggest that pathogen import through modern animal raising may promote the emergence of divergent subpopulations of C. parvum with changed host preference.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msac150


An update on Cryptosporidium biology and therapeutic avenues.

A key pediatric diarrheal pathogen has been identified in resource-limited countries, particularly in very young children. However, the only available drug has limited effectiveness and can only be administered in a medical setting to children older than one year. New therapeutic avenues have been explored by several drug research studies, as well as new therapeutic avenues. Cryptosporidium's unique biology is proving difficult for the traditional drug discovery pipeline and requires novel drug screening methods. These are expected to develop into medical candidates for cryptosporidiosis treatment in the future.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12639-022-01510-5


Octaarginine Improves the Efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Cryptosporidium parvum.

Cryptosporidiosis is an intestinal disease that affects a variety of hosts, including animals and humans. Drug therapy is the mainstay of disease prevention since there are no vaccines against the disease up to date. Nitazoxanide is the only FDA-approved drug for the treatment of human cryptosporidiosis. We have investigated the possibility of the cell-penetrating peptide octaarginine to enhance NTZ uptake in the present study. Octaarginine was synthetically attached to NTZ in a releasable manner and was used to prevent Cryptosporidium parvum formation in an in vitro culture system employing human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cell lines.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11060653


Effect of Caging on Cryptosporidium parvum Proliferation in Mice.

Cryptosporidiosis is an enteric disease caused by several protozoan species in the genus Cryptosporidium. A majority of mice caged in groups of four mice did not excrete a detectable amount of oocysts in a group of four mice. Microbiota u03b1 strain in samples collected three days before infection and one day post-infection were negatively associated with cryptosporidiosis severity, suggesting a causal negative relationship between microbiota diversity and susceptibility to C. parvum.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10061242


Detection of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in Environmental Water Samples: A Journey into the Past and New Perspectives.

The presence of the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium spp. is one of the primary problems related to safe water for consumption. Monitoring is crucial, particularly in water sources feeding treatment plants, since they are both responsible for gastrointestinal illnesses that can be waterborne. Many molecular-biology-based methods have also been developed to identify Cryptosporidium and Giardia cells from environmental or clinical samples since the 1990s. In this article, the use of Cryptosporidium spp. in the literature is explored, as well as several biomolecular techniques, such as graduate students, researchers, drinking water scientists, epidemiologists, and public health experts are among the reader's guidebooks. Giardia spp. and Giardia spp.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10061175

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions