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Cryptosporidium - Astrophysics Data System

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Last Updated: 17 May 2022

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Biofilm Sampling for Detection of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in a Southeastern Pennsylvania Watershed

Compared to EPA Method 1623. 1, the cost savings of using biofilms to track Cryptosporidium contamination will enable utilities to sample water sources more often and at more locations than is realistic given limited operating budgets. Biofilm analysis could be used to determine high-risk areas within a large, complicated watershed and the associated water treatment plants at risk for increased oocyst loads in the water supply; this information can then be used to determine the locations within the watershed where the more costly EPA Method 1623. 1 is warranted. Although oocyst detection or numbers of oocysts found by sliding biofilm testing did not necessarily agree on a particular day, there was no seasonal variation in the frequency of oocyst detection or numbers of oocysts found whether the water was monitored by filtration or slide biofilm sampling. These results show that oocyst detection in biofilms is similar to oocyst detection in filter water samples. Compared to EPA Method 1623. 1, the cost savings of using biofilms to screen for Cryptosporidium contamination would enable utilities to sample water supplies more often, and at more locations than is possible given limited operating budgets. Biofilm analysis may be used to identify high-risk areas within a large, complicated watershed and the water treatment plants at potential risk for increased oocyst loads in the water supply; this information could then be used to determine the locations within the watershed where the more costly EPA Method 1623. 1 is indicated.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2020ApEnM..86E1399J/abstract


Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in non-human primates in rural and urban areas of Ethiopia

In rural and urban Ethiopian rural and urban areas, Chlorocebus aethiops and Colobus guereza samples from 185 fecal samples of Chlorocebus aethiops and Colobus guereza. In two samples, mixed infection with C. parvum and C. hominis was confirmed. Four C. hominis family subtypes and one C. parvum family subtype were identified, as well as one C. parvum family subtype. The most common subtypes found were C. hominis IaA20 and C. parvum IIaA17G1R1. Chlorocebus aethiops and Colobus guereza can be infected with a number of C. parvum and Colobus guereza subtypes that can also infect humans. These findings have shown that Chlorocebus aethiops and Colobus guereza can be infected with Chlorocebus aethiops and Colobus guereza subtypes that can infect humans. Additional studies may help to determine the role of NHPs in the zoonotic transmission of Cryptosporidium in Ethiopia.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2022PLoSO..1767103H/abstract


Cryptosporidium -Biofilm Interactions: a Review

This paper seeks to synthesize all currently available information on interactions between Cryptosporidium oocysts and biofilms. Following a waterborne outbreak, the integration of Cryptosporidium oocysts in biofilm has been well demonstrated. According, in oocyst water quality testing, it has been suggested that substrate-associated biofilms be investigated more thoroughly. The effect of physicochemical variables has been investigated on oocyst biofilm retention. Surface roughness, ionic concentration, laminar/turbulent flow, shear strain, and electrostatic repulsion factors all appear to be relevant when considering oocyst removal from biofilm.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2021ApEnM..87E2483L/abstract


Calcium-Mediated Biophysical Binding of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts to Surfaces Is Sensitive to Oocyst Age

This research will determine how much of the binding ability is due to long-range electrostatic forces versus other bonding methods. In addition to raising the scientific understanding of fate and transport of oocysts, an improved understanding of the binding mechanisms may help with the development of new tools and sensors that monitor and track oocysts in waterways. ABSTRACT: Cryptosporidium parvum is a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease in humans and can not be effectively removed from drinking water by traditional methods. This research investigates the link of C. parvum oocysts to silanized surfaces. Any age, oocyst age, oocysts bind most strongly to carboxylic acid functional groups, with rupture rates greater than that required to crack noncovalent molecular bonds. This research provides new insight into the chemical conditions that influence C. parvum oocyst binding to surfaces. Increasing knowledge of how age and water chemistry influence the binding strength of oocysts may help with future environmental monitoring and drinking water treatment, as well as the introduction of oocyst-specific sensors that allow for more accurate monitoring of oocysts in the environment. This research starts to show the mechanism of direct binding of Cryptosporidium parvum to surfaces with both carboxylic acid and amine moieties, in an attempt to determine how much of the binding ability is due to long-range electrostatic forces rather than other bonding techniques.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2019ApEnM..85E.816S/abstract


Veterinary Students Have a Higher Risk of Contracting Cryptosporidiosis when Calves with High Fecal Cryptosporidium Loads Are Used for Fetotomy Exercises

Cryptosporidium spp. After handling calves, epidemics of cryptosporidiosis have arisen in several countries. Both students and calves were included in the context of the fetotomy experiments, according to our investigation, which used a One Health approach and combined epidemiological approaches and laboratory methods. The findings revealed a high risk of contracting cryptosporidiosis among vet students in the fetotomy lab environment, particularly when using calves with high fecal Cryptosporidiosis loads. Our results will be used to inform future attempts to discourage the transmission of Cryptosporium parvum to students during fetotomy exercises. ABSTRACT OF HYPODERY TERMS An outbreak of cryptosporidiosis among veterinarian students participating in fetotomy treatments in euthanized calves in Denmark in September 2018 occurred. Eleven students completed a questionnaire regarding symptoms and potential risk behavior. In stool samples from students and scientists used to determine the fecal parasite load in the calves used for the experiments, stools samples from students and to determine the fecal parasite load in the calves used for the experiments. During the exercise, we found the risk factors for cryptosporidiosis during diarrheic calf, detecting apparent fecal contamination on the personal protective equipment, and reporting problems with PPE during the training. Comparing to younger calves, a significant percentage of the calves aged 7 days old and above were positive. The results revealed a high risk of contracting cryptosporidiosis among veterinarians in the context of the fetotomy procedures, particularly when using calves with high fecal Cryptosporidium loads. During fetotomy exercises, our results can be used to inform future attempts to minimize the transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum to students.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2020ApEnM..86E1250T/abstract


Cryptosporidium Attenuation across the Wastewater Treatment Train: Recycled Water Fit for Purpose

ABSTRACT Compliance with guideline removal goals for Cryptosporidium that do not give any credit for the inactivation of oocysts by wastewater treatment processes can greatly raise the cost of providing recycled water. After various treatment stages at three Victorian and two South Australian wastewater treatment plants, here we discuss the use of an integrated assay to determine both oocyst counts and infectivity levels. The ability to quantify risk from infectious oocysts revealed that the danger from Cryptosporidium is much lower than previously expected, and that including it in quantitative risk assessments of reuse schemes will more accurately guide treatment decisions and capital investment, improving the longevity of such programs. Thus, the inclusion of oocyst infection in guideline values and in a quantitative microbial risk assessment has the ability to influence future treatment recommendations and capital investment.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApEnM..83E3068K/abstract


Pseudo-Second-Order Calcium-Mediated Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Attachment to Environmental Biofilms

The return of biofilm-associated C. parvum oocysts back into the water column by biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion of biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion of oocyst attachment to biofilms, as well as the physical and chemical factors controlling oocyst attachment to biofilms is important to predict the behavior of oocysts in the environment. Biofilms were produced in rotating annular bioreactors using prefiltered stream water and rock biofilms until the mean biofilm thickness reached steady state, according to our analysis. The deposition of Oocyst demonstrated no indication of solution ionic strength; rather, the presence of calcium enhanced oocyst attachment, as shown by deposition tests. IMPORTANCE The cation bridging model in our study gives new insight into the effects of calcium on the attachment of C. parvum oocysts to environmental biofilms.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApEnM..83E2339L/abstract


Environmental Transport of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Cryptosporidium Species and Subtypes through Combined Sewer Overflow and Wastewater

ABSTRACT TRACTATION OF Cryptosporidium spp. The environmental transport of Cryptosporidium spp. In this research, we took 40 CSO samples and 40 raw wastewater samples from Shanghai, China, and analyzed them by PCR and DNA sequencing for Cryptosporidium species, Giardia duodenalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes. In addition to Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, two new pathogens found in industrialized countries, C. ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium viatorum, were also identified. Both of the two novel C. ubiquitum subtype families identified appeared to be genetic recombinants of well-known subtype families. Similarly, the most prevalent group 1 E. bieneusi genotypes and G. duodenalis subassemblage AII are identified human pathogens. Storm overflow is a common pathogen in surface water, according to the same distribution of human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium species and E. bieneusi and G. duodenalis genotypes between wastewater and CSO samples, reaffirms that the same source of pathogens in surface water. The frequent detection of C. ubiquitum and C. viatorum in urban water indicates that these recently identified human pathogens are endemic in China. According to this report, urban storm overflow, as well as untreated urban wastewater, combined sewer overflow is often contaminated with human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium, G. duodenalis, and E. bieneusi genotypes and subtypes, and urban storm overflow can play a significant role in the contamination of drinking source water and recreational water with human pathogens. Both newly identified human pathogens, Cryptosporidium viatorum, and Cryptosporidium viatorum, are also present in China, and genetic recombination can result in the emergence of novel C. ubiquitum subtype families.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApEnM..83E.682H/abstract


Role of Wall Shear Stress in Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Attachment to Environmental Biofilms

These steady-state biofilms were then used to determine the effects of hydrodynamic conditions on C. parvum oocyst attachments. Both laminar and turbulent flows induced a pseudo-second-order scheme in C. parvum deposition onto biofilms. When the hydrodynamic wall shear stress increased, the number of oocysts attached to the biofilm at a steady state decreased. With increasing shear stress, the oocyst deposition rate increased at constant rate, but dropped at high shear, causing faster attachment of Cryptosporidium due to increased mass transport until the shear forces reach a critical threshold that prevents oocyst attachment. These results reveal that oocyst attachment in the short and long run are affected by shear: higher shear may be responsible for quicker initial oocyst attachment, but lower shear is associated with greater numbers of oocysts attached at equilibrium, which is shown by the following tables.

Source link: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApEnM..83E1533L/abstract

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions