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Croup - Crossref

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Last Updated: 29 April 2022

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Assessment of Intubation in Croup and Epiglottitis

In acute epiglottitis management, Nasotracheal intubation for the treatment of airway blockage has been a well-received procedure. The purpose of this research was to update the collection of nasotracheal intubations from Columbus Children's Hospital's croup and epiglottitis with the specific intention of assessing its effectiveness. This research, which was earlier published by the same institution on its health in both cases, confirms the earlier findings regarding its safety in both conditions.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/000348948209100417


Correlating the Clinical Course of Recurrent Croup with Endoscopic Findings: A Retrospective Observational Study

Objectives: We wanted to connect endoscopic findings to the clinical course of recurrent croup's recurrent croup. Methods: Children were categorized as having recurrent croup if they had 2 or more episodes of barky cough, inspiratory stridor, and hoarseness. All of the study participants underwent direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy and were started on an antireflux regimen. In our outpatient clinic for otolaryngology, forty-seven children with recurrent croup were seen. Tenty patients had a medical history of asthma, and ten of them had a prior diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux. During direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy in 87. 2%, Gastroesophageal reflux-related laryngopharyngeal changes were seen. Following a 6- to 9-month course of antireflux drugs, 87. 5% of those with survey follow-up reported an improvement of respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: The underlying recurrent croup's narrowing process can be traced to gastroesophageal reflux and should be considered in any child with persistent barky cough, inspiratory stridor, and hoarseness.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1177/000348940811700610


Variation in Dexamethasone Dosing and Use Outcomes for Inpatient Croup

OBJECTIVES Evaluate the connection between dexamethasone dosing and hospitalization of children hospitalized with croup. METHODS This report was nested within a multisite prospective cohort study of children aged 6 months to 6 years admitted to one of 5 U. S. children's hospitals between July 2014 and June 06. RESULTS Among 234 patients hospitalized with croup, the patient characteristics did not change despite the number of doses. > 1 dose was not associated with same-cause reuse in adjusted studies, but it was associated with 45% longer LOS. When we adjusted for LOS, >1 dose was not associated with different cost despite different cost despite differential cost. CONCLUSIONS We discovered significant interhospital variability in dexamethasone dosing and LOS, which led to significant interhospital variability. When we adjusted for severity on presentation, > 1 dexamethasone dose was associated with longer LOS but not reuse, but not reuse. Although incomplete adjustment of severity is a possible explanation, several hospitals may continue to hospitalize children hospitalized to administer multiple doses of dexamethasone.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1542/hpeds.2021-005854


Accidental button battery ingestion presenting as croup

Abstract Objectives: To report a case of misdiagnosis of an affected oesophageal button battery in a child, and to describe the underlying risk factors for impaction and treatment of such cases. Case report: An 18-month-old, otherwise healthy, and well child with stridular respiratory disease was initially treated for croup. Conclusion: This case illustrates the difficulty of diagnosing oesophageal foreign bodies.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0022215114000073


COVID-19-Associated Croup in Children

croup has been traced to croup, but few cases have reported croup specific to SARS-CoV-2, and it is unclear if croup infections are related to a causal connection or result of co-infection with another virus. 3–6 We conducted a retrospective review of the prevalence and clinical characteristics of croup at a large freestanding children's hospital to address this knowledge gap, but no case reports have been published, but no case reports have reported croup croup, but no croup, but no croup croup, but it was reported croup, but it was reported croup-CoV-2 infection in croup, virus co-CoV2 infection with another virus co-CoV-2 infection.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2022-056492


Croup during the COVID-19 Omicron Variant Surge

The proportion of infections caused by the Omicron variant was determined by contemporaneously available local data in King County, Washington, with spike gene target failure on TaqPath PCR assays serving as a proxy for the number of infections caused by the Omicron variant. During the Omicron surge, 102 patients were diagnosed with croup during the Delta surge, and 107 patients were diagnosed with croup during the Omicron surge. Patients who benefited from the Omicron surge were more likely to test positive for COVID-19. Children with a medical diagnosis of croup during the Omicron surge were more likely to be prescribed racemic epinephrine as part of their health care. During the Omicron surge, the incidence of croup nearly doubled relative to the number in prior months, though the number of cases of parainfluenza virus in the United States decreased.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.02.02.22270222


The management of recurrent croup in children

Our hospital's otolaryngology department, which we acquired from November 2002 to March 2011, was the subject of a retrospective case note. Ninety children with recurrent croup were identified. For 41 of the children, no cause was found; this was the group with the most likely to see croup at a later date. In children who have recurrent croup, airway anomalies are common. In the current review, laryngobronchoscopy findings that indicated reflux were predictive of benefit from anti-reflux drugs, according to the medical presentation of reflux.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0022215113000418


Croup, supraglottitis, and laryngitis

Nevertheless, supraglottitic organs, including epiglottis, arytenoepiglottic folds, arytenoids, and false vocal cords, are characterized by inflammation and edema of the supraglottic tissues, including epiglottis, arytenoepiglottic folds, arytenoids, and false vocal cords. It is recommended that acute supraglottitis infection treatment involves an airway and the use of appropriate antibiotics. An acute laryngitis often presents with hoarseness, odynophagia, and localized pain, which may also be referred to and manifests as otalgia. Because the majority of cases of acute laryngitis are viral in etiology and self-limited, treatment usually involves resting the voice and inhaling moistened air.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190888367.003.0030


Severe Croup: The Child With Fever and Upper Airway Obstruction

Infectious causes of airway obstruction can be identified by anatomic location and causative agent. A spasmodic croup is a mild, transitory subglottic swelling that responds to mist and occasionally antihistamine therapy. The laryngotracheobronohitis is the downward extension of viral syncy, often followed by bacterial superinfection. Antibiotics may be required, and airway intervention is more likely to be indicated than for uncomplicated viral croup. Bacterial tracheitis is a common bacterial infection that causes thick secretions and membrane formation. Diphtheria is a bacterial disease with toxin production, a drug infection whose treatment includes both antitoxin and antibiotic therapy as well as, in some cases, an artificial airway.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1542/pir.7.8.227


Croup and Related Disorders

Although there are numerous potential causes of upper airway obstructions, only a few diagnoses predominate. For example, 89% of cases were caused by croup, 8% by epiglottitis, and 22% by nonbacterial tracheitis. 1 This article will explore these common airway infections as well as obstruction caused by inhalation of foreign bodies, spasmodic croup, and 2% by nonbacterial tracheitis. Individuals caring for children must be able to recognize and treat airway emergencies as quickly as possible. The implementation of emergency response services is based on the investigation of acute upper airway obstructions by Appropriate management of acute upper airway blockages. A team approach to successful management of airway emergencies necessitates a coalition approach, which includes the skills of the primary physician and the firefighters of the ambulance department, radiology department, and operating room. The topic of airway protection prior to or during transportation to a tertiary care facility is contentious.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1542/pir.14.1.19

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

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* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions