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Cortisol - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 19 September 2022

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The Associations Between Perioperative Depression or Anxiety, Salivary Cortisol and α-amylase, and Administered Anesthesia Type in Knee Arthroscopy With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLR): Prospective, Randomized Trial

Previous research has shown that worrying about postoperative pain, anxiety about receiving sick leave, loss of selfcare and work ability, fear of surgery, and even death are all typical causes contributing to perioperative anxiety symptoms. The perioperative characteristic of depression or anxiety is determined by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires, salivary cortisol, salivary u03b1-amylase, and blood glucose. Both the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system during stress response are produced respectively, but they are not included in the routine assessment of perioperative physiological stress response. In experiments of circadian variation and in randomly collected samples, salivary cortisol and amylase were found as stress biomarkers to investigate their associations with anesthetic approach in our research. Since only trace of cortisol are present in saliva, salivary cortisol is considered a more appropriate measure for the clinical evaluation of adrenocortical function than serum cortisol. Several research using stress tactics have shown that salivary a-amylase is highly sensitive to stress-related changes. For the first time, the investigators are attempting to enroll patients who are supposed to undergo knee arthroscopy with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Patients in the Georgia region will be treated with general anesthesia and femoral nerve block. Patients in the NGA group will be treated with neuraxial anesthesia, FNB, and without sedation.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05315648


The Effects of Hydrocortisone, Melatonin, and Placebo on Symptoms of Jet Lag

People who suffer severe from this disorder can benefit from a method of quickly synchronizing the circadian rhythm to the local time. Although a time shift doesn't affect the total daily amount of cortisol that is unknown, the cortisol secretions's temporal organization is disrupted, and the circadian rhythm does not re-entrain for several days, but the circadian rhythm does not re-entrain for several days. According to this, the first few mornings in a new time zone can be considered relatively cortisol-deficient because the traveler does not encounter the peak of cortisol at the time of awakening. Taking exogenous glucocorticoids at the right time can help reentrain the circadian rhythm and result in less jet lag. According to a new meta-analysis, taking melatonin can help reduce jet lag symptoms. Hydrocortisone, melatonin, a mixture of both hydrocortisone and placebo, is the subject of the current study, which is the first attempt to minimize jet lag symptoms with hydrocortisone, melatonin, a derivative of both hydrocortisone and placebo. Volunteers will first be greeted at the new destination in the morning and then take 25 mg hydrocortisone. Subjects will receive these doses for three days for a total of four days. On one day before travel and at the new destination for days 1 - 10, 7, and 10, participants will also receive salivary samples of cortisol and melatonin on awakening and at bedtime. Subjects will sleep logs and fill out a health questionnaire daily for 3 days and four days after the flight, as well as on days 7 and 10.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00097474

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions