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Coral Reefs - Wiley Online Library

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Last Updated: 18 January 2023

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Cascading benefits of mutualists' predators on foundation species: A model inspired by coral reef ecosystems

Multispecies mutualisms are embedded in a network of interactions that include predation, but the effects of predation on mutualism function have not been well integrated into mutualism theory. We use a mathematical model of a predatory fish that eats two competing coral mutualists to show that predators can also have indirect positive effects on hosts, particularly when they chooseentially consume competitively dominant mutualists that are also lower in quality. Our results show that when the strength of predation shifts, mutualist communities will display dynamic responses with nonmonotonic effects on host service provision.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.4382


Variation in the parasite communities of three co‐occurring herbivorous coral reef fishes

Coral reefs are one of the world's most aquatic habitats, but our knowledge of the abundance, diversity, and composition of parasite communities of coral reef fishes is limited. Here, we sought to determine the presence, richness, and composition of parasite families among three co-u20 occuring coral reef fishes from an inshore reef of the Great Barrier Reef. All parasites were abundant and family richness in S. doliatus, intermediate in P. wards, and lowest in P. adelus. P. adelus, S. doliatus, and P. wardi's wardi had similar abundances of ectoparasites, so ectoparasite abundances were also lower. Investigating the origins and effects of variation in parasite communities in a wider range of fish species will be crucial to determine the potential role of parasites in coral reef ecosystems.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jfb.15311


Long‐wavelength‐sensitive (lws) opsin gene expression, foraging and visual communication in coral reef fishes

Coral reef fishes are diverse in ecology and behaviour, and they display striking color variation. Investigating the visual pigment gene expression in these fishes makes it possible to link their visual genotype and phenotype to visual tasks, such as feeding regimen or conspecific detection. The long-u2010wavelength (u2010wavelength) and representatives from five other coral reef fish families are abundantly expressed in algivorous and less or not expressed in zooplanktivorous species, according to our study. In species with orange/red hues, Lws is also restricted in species with orange/red hues, and expression is at its peak in orange/red algivores, which is also the largest in orange/red u2010 colored algivores. Although the relative timing of traits may differ among reconstructions and alternate explanations are possible, our findings are consistent with sensory bias, whereby social signals vary as a natural reaction to natural selection on sensory system properties in other contexts.

Source link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mec.16831

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions