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Coral Reefs - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 18 January 2023

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Microeconomic adaptation to severe climate disturbances on Australian coral reefs

Coral reefs are increasingly affected by climate-induced changes that are exacerbated by rising ocean temperatures. People whose livelihoods and well-being depend on the ecosystem services reefs provide are particularly vulnerable as a result of coral reef loss. To fill this gap, we interviewed half of Australian reef tourism operators to see how they were affected by and responded to the extreme effects of bleaching and cyclones.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-022-01798-w


Half a century of rising extinction risk of coral reef sharks and rays

Coral reef ecosystems' key structural components include sharks and rays, but many populations of a few species of coral reef ecosystems in the United States show signs of depletion and local extinctions. We use the IUCN Red List to determine the status, course, and dangers to all coral reef sharks and rays around the world. Here, we find that almost two-thirds of the 134 coral-reef associated shark and ray species are endangered by extinction. Among the most endangered species on coral reefs are marine mammals, sharks, and rays. Immediate action through local government policies, as well as broad-scale fisheries management and Marine Protected Areas, is required to prevent extinctions and loss of vital ecosystem services such as reef reefs and human life, decreasing livelihoods and food security. Sharks and rays are two common coral reef species.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-35091-x


Coral reefs and coastal tourism in Hawaii

This report finds that live reefs attract visitors, aiding local conservation, but that tourism harms especially the healthiest reefs by posting social media results. Coral reefs both attract and suffer from coastal tourism, according to a regional analysis in Hawaii by combining web-scraped Instagram data from tourists with high-resolution live coral cover maps.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-022-01021-4


Seasonal net calcification by secondary calcifiers in coral reefs of the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean

In two reefs: the semi-enclosed Bahu00eda Tiburu00f3n reef and the open Las Monas fringing reef were measured, and coverage were measured. The calcifier population in Las Monas varied between seasons, according to the seasons. In the semi-enclosed reef and both reefs' exposed microhabitat, a seasonal effect on net calcification was observed. Calcification in the open fringing reef was almost double that in the semi-enclosed reef. Both reefs experienced widespread coral bleaching as a result of the ENSO event of 2015, which resulted in a mass coral bleaching event. That thermal stress may have explained the calcification decline in 2015u20132016, but it may have also obscured a more consistent seasonal pattern in net calcification. Secondary calcifiers are the first to show that elevated seawater temperatures can influence carbonate production by secondary calcifiers. This is the first to show that anomalous and persistent high seawater temperatures can influence carbonate production.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-022-04158-0


Fish sounds of photic and mesophotic coral reefs: variation with depth and type of island

In most islands, acoustic fish u03b1-diversity decreased between 20 and 60 m, but not between 60 and 120 m. Fish sound types Community composition was more influenced by depth than by the type of island, owing to benthic coral cover differences, rather than by the type of island.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00338-022-02343-7


Conservation benefits of no-take marine reserves outweigh modest benefits of partially protected areas for targeted coral reef fishes

Marine bound zones are essential protection devices, partially covered zones, and less enclosed u201copenu201d fishing zones are all typical conservation techniques, and they often include fully protected zones, partially covered zones, partially shielded zones, and less accessible u201d fishing zones. Full coverage from fishing on targeted fish biomass was a major positive influence, as well as a modest protective role, even in areas where spearfishing was outlawed. More than three times the biomass of highly targeted coral trout was discovered in partially protected zones in comparison to open fishing zones, with more than three times the biomass in partially protected zones. Structural complexity was a consistent positive divert of fish biomass for all fish groups and in all zones. Notably high fish target fish biomass was recorded at NTMR sites with the highest structural complexity, underlining the importance of both habitat and cover in establishing population hotspots for targeted reef fishes.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00338-022-02340-w


Benthic composition changes on coral reefs at global scales

According to the authors' report, based on a global database of over 24,000 observations of coral reef benthic cover, high macroalgal coverage is largely restricted to the Western Atlantic, where along the Central Pacific there have also been notable declines in coral cover since the late 1990s. However, the current status and distribution of global coral reef benthic communities is uncertain. Here's a global database of 24,468 observations from 22 years shows that coral cover declines occurred in the Western Atlantic and Central Pacific, showing that coral cover exhibited the largest declines in coral cover occurred in the Western Atlantic and Central Pacific. On a global scale, the raw data indicates that decreased average hard coral cover from 36 u00b1 1. 4% to 19 u00b1 0. 4% was largely responsible for decreased shallow-lying algal cover such as algal turfs and crustose coralline algae. Anthropocene coral reefs will need improved understanding of reef change, as shown by decreased hard coral cover and increased coverage of low-lying algal populations.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-022-01937-2


Coral Reef: A Hot Spot of Marine Biodiversity

Coral reefs are the world's biggest reservoirs of aquatic habitat: they host 32 of 34 surveyed phyla and approximately one third of all marine species. The u201d Triangle u201d consists of eastern Indonesia and Malaysia, eastern Malaysia and Malaysia, the Philippines, Timor-Lest e, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands, and the Solomon Islands. The u201d Cubec Triangle'u201d u201d encloses global coral reef habitats, including eastern Indonesia and Malaysia, eastern Malaysia, eastern Indonesia and Malaysia, the Philippines, Timor-Leste e e, u201d Coral reefs around the world are also deriving significantly during the Anthropocene period, and particularly during 1950, when human pressures reached their peak. It has been predicted that 33% of all reef-building corals would be extinct due to local threats as well as climate change impacts. Coral reefs are considered as one of the ocean's most fascinating hot spots, which help support aquatic habitats as the key underwater biodiversity hot spots.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-5841-0_8


The Willingness of Fishermen Households to Accept Coral Reef Conservation in Order to Support Sustainable Marine Tourism in Gili Matra, Indonesia

Marine tourism activities that have been encouraged have more focus on the economic aspect, in which tourism activities are expected to have the greatest positive economic impact. This report finds the willingness of fishermen's families to receive a certain amount in exchange for coral reef conservation efforts in Gili Matra using a quantitative research approach.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2991/978-2-494069-21-3_31


Do marine protected areas protect shallow coral reef systems? A resilience-based management approach in Tropical Southwestern Atlantic reefs

Marine Protected Areas that use spatial zoning as a management tool are partially covered by Tropical Southwestern Atlantic reefs that are partially covered by Marine Protected Areas that use spatial zoning as a management tactic. In Brazil's country's biggest coastal MPA, a resilience-based management strategy was used to assess the effectiveness of no-take areas in improving reef resilience. To determine resilience scores, ecological indicators were used to determine resilience scores, allowing the assumption that no-take reefs have greater resilience than tourism reefs. The primary management steps included in the establishment of no-take areas in coastal habitats such as mangroves and seagrass beds are the establishment of no-take areas in coastal habitats.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11852-022-00930-y

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions