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Colorectal Cancer - ClinicalTrials.gov

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Last Updated: 19 January 2023

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Colorectal Cancer Screening in Black and Underserved Communities in the Phoenix Metro Area: Addressing Disparities in Cancer Prevention

In Phoenix, the goal is to measure patient navigation to fix colorectal cancer in people of color, minority groups, and establish a continuing colorectal cancer screening service. Participants receive FIT test results through Mayo Clinic nursing assistance, and participants of a positive test are accompanied by a patient navigator to plan next steps and consulting with a gastroenterologist to analyze their findings.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05447923


Phase 1 Trial of ONC201 for Chemoprevention of Colorectal Cancer

The optimal cancer prevention dose of ONC201 is determined as the lowest dose with less than or equal to 16. 67% of participants experiencing harmful exposure and simultaneous development of a statistically significant rise in human apoptosis factor-related ligand expression. Participants who receive toxicity are less than or equal to 16. 67% of participants who experience acute illness and simultaneously result in a statistically significant rise in normal human mucosa TRAIL expression. To determine the lowest dose of ONC201 with less than or equal to 16. 67 percent of participants experiencing unacceptable symptoms and simultaneously resulting in a statistically significant rise in normal human mucosa TRAIL expression. In participants with familial adenomatous polyposis or multiple adenomas, we'll investigate the effectiveness and tolerability of several ascending doses of ONC201 administered weekly and every 3 weeks. Cell death markers, stemness indicators, and natural killers cell infiltration in adenomas and in normal colonic mucosa; Ie. To establish organoids ex vivo and compare adenoma-derived organoid take rates in samples obtained prior to and following therapy, the researchers were unable to establish organoids ex vivo and compared adenoma-derived organoid serum samples.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05630794


The Role of the Microbiome in Colorectal Cancer Onset and Progression

Many that are polyp/cancer free, pre-cancerous, and confirmed primary diagnosis of colorectal cancer will be recruited. Participants are also encouraged to provide tissue or tumor samples if requested by their healthcare facility during a procedure of care biopsy procedures. The clinical staff at each study site will collect biopsy samples for this examination. In this research, there are five timepoints, including: Timepoint 1, Timepoint 2, Timepoint 3, Timepoint 4, and Timepoint 5. The initial diagnosis of cancer is determined by imaging or colonoscopy findings, which is included in the TP1 series. Samples from cancer patients will be collected 45 +/- 15 days after all treatment sessions have been completed. The cancer survivors' TP3, 4, and 5 patients were diagnosed with cancer-free and precancerous diseases and 1,2 and 3 years respectively, two years and 5, respectively, came 1, 2 and 3 years after the cancer groups' standard of care therapy was used.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05368688


An mHealth Symptom Management Intervention for Colorectal Cancer Patients

Patients with multiple persistent illnesses may be particularly vulnerable to lack of confidence in their ability to manage their symptoms. With unique content made for young and middle-aged colorectal cancer patients, the investigators plan to use a random controlled trial to evaluate an innovative mHealth Coping Skills Training intervention targeted at pain, exhaustion, emotional distress, and quality of life. Young and middle-aged adults with colorectal cancer that have multiple signs of varying signs will be randomized to either 1 mCOPE or 2 standard care. mCOPE includes five videoconferencing sessions on a cognitive behavior theory-based protocol that teaches coping skills, such as relaxation, activity pacing, and cognitive enhancement in the context of younger patients' particular challenges. Aim 2: Examine boosted self-efficacy for symptom control by acting as a symptom mediator of symptom severity.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04763174


Diet Education Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors in the Safety Net Setting: A Pilot Feasibility Study

At Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, To describe the feasibility and acceptability of a group diet education program for colorectal cancer survivors. At ZSFGH, To describe perceived barriers to a healthy diet among CRC refugees. Using a nationally accredited lifestyle score, we'll investigate changes in health-related habits before and after intervention. OUTLINE: Patients attend group diet education sessions every two weeks for over 1. 5 hours.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04597151


Evaluating Intermittent Dosing of Aspirin for Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention

The Ia To determine the effects of aspirin therapy on: Ia. Ib. In rectal biopsies, the ratio of cell proliferation/apoptosis is 1:1; apoptosis; Stool samples were used to determine a Fecal occult blood test. Ia. To determine the effects of aspirin therapy on: Ia. Ie, a joint index of COX-2 with TRPM7 expression in rectal biopsies; Ie. Methylation assays using the MethylationEPIC BeadChip to identify methylation biomarkers in genes involved in colorectal carcinogenesis and other epigenome-wide methylation biomarkers as measured in rectal biopsies; Ig. In rectal swabs, Metagenomics analysis was used to determine the presence of Escherichia coli and Fusobacterium and other microbiota. ARM I: In the absence of unacceptable toxicity, patients receive aspirin orally every 12 weeks. Patients receive aspirin PO daily at weeks 1-3, 7-9, and placebo PO every day at weeks 4-6 and -10-12 in the absence of unacceptable toxicity. ARM III: Patients receive placebo PO for a year in the absence of unacceptable toxicity.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02965703


A Multi-Center Study of Non-Invasive Colorectal Cancer Evaluation in Cystic Fibrosis (NICE-CF)

The length of time between submitting stool samples and screening colonoscopy can vary by site-specific clinical colonoscopy sampling times and COVID delays in scheduling, as well as COVID delays in scheduling, can extend up to 12 months for including data in the study. If clinic visits are remote, CF patients who are eligible for CRC screening will either be enrolled during an in-person CF clinic visit or via video if clinic visits are taking place remotely. Participants will be encouraged to perform stool sample collection at home and then complete their colonoscopy within three months of submission of the stool sample.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05362344


Mediterranean Diet and Weight Loss: Targeting the Bile Acid/Gut Microbiome Axis to Reduce Colorectal Cancer

African Americans have a higher prevalence of these risk factors and they have the highest risk of CRC and related mortality among African Americans. These multiple risk factors, as well as increased circulating and fecal bile acids, and a change in BA amino acid conjugation from glycine to taurine are also connected to elevated circulating and fecal bile acids, as well as a change in BA amino acid conjugation from glycine to taurine in these multiple risk factors. The H2S-producing bacteria in the colon of AAs is noticeably higher than in non-Hispanic whites, and is a defining feature of AA CRC cases that attribute these bacteria to CRC proliferation in a race-dependent manner. The investigators hypothesize that targeting the BA-gut microbiome axis to decrease the availability, expansion, and metabolic activity of H2S and DCA bacteria by diet and weight loss may reduce CRC risk, particularly among AAs. No studies have investigated the effects of a MedDiet alone, WL by lifestyle modification, or a calorie-restricted MedDiet for WL on the BA-gut microbiome axis and its relevance to CRC prevention among AAs to CRC prevention among AAs. 2 Concentration and composition of circulating and fecal BAs; 2 Gut microbiota and metabolic function; and 3 Gene expression profiles of exfoliated intestinal epithelial cells can be used to compare the effects of the experiments. If this research is successful, it could have a major public health impact on CRC risk among AAs and other high-risk populations, which could lead to timely dissemination opportunities.

Source link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04753359

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions