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Climate Change - OSTI GOV

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Last Updated: 19 January 2023

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The Worldwide C3S CORDEX Grand Ensemble: A Major Contribution to Assess Regional Climate Change in the IPCC AR6 Atlas

The collaboration between the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment and the Earth System Grid Federation provides access to unprecedented series of regional climate model simulations, distributed over the 14 CORDEX continental-scale domains, with global coverage. In the new contribution of the Working Group I to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report, regional chapters and the Atlas, simulations have been used as a new line of evidence to evaluate regional climate projections. We investigate here its reliability for precipitation and temperature by comparing climate change signals in regions with overlapping CORDEX domains, resulting in overall consistent regional climate change indicators in lieu of presenting the global CORDEX data. The C3S CORDEX dataset has been used for the analysis of regional climate change in the IPCC AR6 and is available through the Copernicus Climate Data Store.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1906586


Farmers’ Perception of Climate Change and Its Impacts on Agriculture

Rapid glacier melt and snowpack loss, severe precipitation and temperature changes, and change in water availability in the Himalayas are all caused by climate change and climate variability. In the central Himalayan region, there is increasing evidence of climate change's influence on water resource availability and agricultural productivity. Here, we examine the farmers' u2019 perception of climate change and its impacts on agriculture in western Nepal. Integrated analysis of farmers' perceptions and hydrometeorological data is vital to improving climate change impact assessment and determining mitigation and adaptation plans.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1906563


A research agenda for nonvascular photoautotrophs under climate change

We suggest a research agenda to address this pressing issue by focusing on physiological and economic processes that connect NVP to ecosystem functions while still considering the substantial taxonomic diversity present in a variety of ecosystem types. NVP's habitat-specific ecosystem functions will almost be affected by climate change, according to our researchers, and more quantitative process research is needed on potential for acclimation, reaction to elevated CO2, the role of the microbiome, and climate feedback.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1907217


Predicting the effects of climate change on the cross-scale epidemiological dynamics of a fungal plant pathogen

Abstract The ability of climate change to raise the burden of human infectious disease is increasing, but plant diseases that have little interest. We use a combination of experimental and modeling methods to investigate how climate change can influence fungal plant pathogen epidemics' behavior. Both the within- and between-host scales are expected to slow transmission at first, according to our findings. However, modest resurgences in disease transmission are predicted as warming progresses, especially if the rate of greenhouse gas emissions rises at its current rate. Delaying processes at any one scale of plant pathogen transmission may lead to climate change predictions, as climate drivers have varying and cascading impacts on processes that support transmission that occur at different scales.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1903942


Deforestation-induced climate change reduces carbon storage in remaining tropical forests

Abstract: Biophysical consequences of deforestation have the ability to increase carbon pollution, but carbon accounting methods are often ignored. Tropical forests may be undervalued in carbon accounting methods that neglect surface biophysical feedback, and that deforestation-driven climate change's positive carbon u2013climate feedback from deforestation-driven climate change is higher than that generated by fossil fuel emissions, according to these findings.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1903894


Quantifying uncertainty in aggregated climate change risk assessments

Multiple dangers are integrated into a single framework in a high-level analysis of climate change's impacts. After 1. 5 billion2 u20132 C and severe heat materialise, there are risks associated with extreme heat materialise between 2U20133. 5 u00b0C of warming. Risks emerge sooner if global risk thresholds were determined, underscoring the need for tighter mitigation to minimize future extreme heat risks.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1904162


A Review of Water and Climate Change Analysis in Electric Utility Integrated Resource Planning

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which electric utility integrated resource planning assess the effects of climate change to generation and load. Thermal generating plants have been plagued with water availability in recent years: a shortage of cooling water, weather in which incoming cooling water is too hot for optimal operation, and/or water discharge temperatures exceeding permit limits have all been encountered. Climate change impacts on hydrological cycles may influence the timing, temperature, and amount of water availability for thermal electric cooling and hydrogen production, which could increase the frequency and duration of operational constraints. Climate change can also influence the availability and intensity of electric loads that utilities must use, most notably for heating and cooling.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1906361


Climate change will affect global water availability through compounding changes in seasonal precipitation and evaporation

We use a non-parametric analysis framework to analyze seasonal hydroclimatic regimes by dividing global land regions into nine regimes using late 20th century precipitation methods and seasonality. Using the CMIP5 model future climate projections, these regimes can be used to determine water availability changes as a result of concomitant changes in mean and seasonal precipitation and evaporation transitions. Increases in forecast seasonal precipitation variability in still highly variable precipitation regimes gives rise to a pattern of u201cseasonally changing regimes that is more unpredictableu201d.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1761643


The role of Northeast Pacific meltwater events in deglacial climate change

During the last deglaciation, several floods occurred, but the effects of this fresh water on Pacific hydrography are largely unknown. In the Northeast Pacific, we used a numerical model to simulate ocean circulation changes during this period. To reconstruct changes in ocean circulation during this period, we used a numerical model to simulate the flow trajectory of Columbia River megafloods and collected data of sea surface temperature, paleo-salinity, and deep-water radiocarbon from marine sediment cores. During the early deglacial and Younger Dryas intervals, the North Pacific sea surface cooled and refreshed, coincident with the appearance of subsurface water masses depleted in radiocarbon relative to the sea surface.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1626037


Fast response of fungal and prokaryotic communities to climate change manipulation in two contrasting tundra soils

In two tundra sites in Greenland with contrasting water conditions, we investigate the short-term effect of increased snow cover on soil fungal, bacterial, and archaeal populations. The study revealed that soil microbial populations from two tundra sites differed from each other due to different soil chemical properties. The dry site had more wealth, however, the richness of prokaryotes was higher at the wet tundra site, although prokaryotes' riches were higher. We also discovered that after snow had melted, the effects of increased snow cover were apparent. At two tundra locations, we demonstrated rapid response of soil fungal and bacterial communities to short-term climate manipulation simulating increased winter precipitation. Since fungi are the most widespread decomposers of complex organic matter in terrestrial ecosystems, the more active response of fungal communities may have ramifications for organic matter turnover in tundra soils under future climate.

Source link: https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1816127

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions