Advanced searches left 3/3

Climate Change - Europe PMC

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 19 January 2023

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Climate change impact on herbicide efficacy: A model to predict herbicide dose in common bean under different moisture and temperature conditions

Under 100% MR, weed biomass below 100 g mu207b/b2 decreased by 17% with 1 July plantings, leading to a higher weed biomass and a higher yield loss, 2 weed biomass under 100 percent MR. We used a logistic model M1 to forecast weed biomass W changes with herbicide dose D at each MR%. With their linear results vs. MR%, we got a more sophisticated model M2 that shows W with changing D and MR%. However, crop prohibitions, along with high phytotoxic effects, have barred higher herbicide doses from being used in a weed management scheme to reduce the reduced herbicide effectiveness under future climate conditions.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/IND607936522


The impact of climate change on atopic dermatitis and mental health comorbidities: a review of the literature and examination of intersectionality.

Our knowledge of several inflammatory cutaneous diseases is influencing critical mental stability comorbidities is increasing. The detrimental effects of climate change on human health are now widely recognized as a global public health emergency, and largely coincidentally. This is the first to explore climate change, atopic dermatitis, and mental health comorbidities, and it emphasizes the disproportionate effects of climate change in poor and marginalized populations.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36639925


Global patterns of climate change impacts on desert bird communities.

Climate change is predicted that global desert ecosystems will see disproportionately large temperature rises as a result of global desert warming, but the impacts on global desert wildlife remain uncertain. To predict the physiological consequences of climate change on desert birds globally, we integrate climate change projections with biophysical models and species distributions. Moreover, spatial representations of physiological effects do not simply reflect air temperature changes; rather, spatial patterns of physiological impacts do not simply reflect air temperature changes. Climate change refugia, which are described as hot desert areas with high avian diversity and low predicted physiological impacts, are expected to persist in different desert regions in different desert zones.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36639376


Climate change framing and innovator attention: Evidence from an email field experiment.

Green innovation requires exposing innovators' attention to climate change. We report an email field experiment with MIT that used news about the effects of climate change to encourage innovators to apply for a technology competition. Across scientifically valid scenarios, we differ our opinions on the time frame and severity of climate change's human cost of climate change.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/36638213


1,400 Years of Climate Change in the Northern Hemisphere

The Climate Change primary cause is Anthropogenic Global Warming. This essay explores the solar radiation and Oscillation of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation and its variations, as well as sea ice cover albedo feedback in the Arctic regions, as the cause of climate change in complement to Anthropogenic Global Warming. The Arctic Sea Ice Extension for the past twelve centuries has been simulated by a physical model that incorporates the sunspot number and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation index as inputs. This model illustrates new advances in understanding how existing studies on Arctic Sea ice u2019s albedo feedbacks can help improve Anthropogenic Global Warming models, helping to develop more accurate climate change predictions. In addition, the North Atlantic Oscillation index over 1,200 years is determined, and the climate history of 15 separate European and Northern Hemisphere regions is modelled, based on temperature and precipitation anomalies.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR595647


Vanishing of the El Niño-induced delay effect on the ice mass loss of West Antarctica in future climate change

By causing the weakening of the Amundsen Sea Low and subsequent intense snowfall, the El Niu00f1o has delayed the ice mass loss of West Antarctica under global warming by a year of global warming. This is because the more polar jet linked to the positive SAM trend would lift the ASL anomaly toward the east and the equator in the warmer climate, preventing water vapor transport into the interior of West Antarctica's interior.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR595567


Identifying Cultivation Hotspots of Aquilegia fragrans Benth.-an Endangered Medicinally Important Plant via Ensemble Modelling under Climate Change Scenarios

Climate change is one of the key factors for species redistribution and biodiversity destruction, particularly for endemic and medicinally important plant species with a narrow distribution area. We used an ensemble modeling approach to explore the present and future distribution of the Aquilegia fragrans u2013 a medicinally important endangered plant species in the entire Himalayan biodiversity hotspot, as well as the range dynamics. The northwest states of India's northwest states of India are extremely able and desirable climatic conditions for the growth of A. fragrans, according to the latest report, under current climatic conditions. According to the most recent report, the western Himalayan area would suffer the most habitat loss.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR595540


Biomes of the world under climate change scenarios: increasing aridity and higher temperatures lead to significant shifts in natural vegetation

Using 8959 training points from the BIOME 6000 database and a series of 72 environmental covariates based on historical long-term averages, the global potential distribution of biomes was modelled. For spatial autocorrelation of the training points, an ensemble machine learning system based on stacked regularization was used, with multinomial logistic regression as the meta-learner and spatial blocking to deal with spatial autocorrelation. The BIOME 6000 classes' spatial cross-validation results reveal an overall accuracy of 0. 67 and R 2 logloss of 0. 61, with u201dtropical evergreen broadleaf forest being the class with the highest rise in predictive accuracy, and u201dprostrate dwarf shrub tundrau201d the lowest class in comparison to the baseline. As probability and hard classes maps for BIOME 6000 classes as well as hard classes maps for the IUCN classes, illustrated globe maps with 1 km spatial resolution are included.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR595517


Climate-Change Worry among Two Cohorts of Late Adolescents: Exploring Macro and Micro Worries, Coping, and Relations to Climate Engagement and Well-Being

Among adolescents, only studies have investigated climate change anxiety in a more in-depth manner. Climate change anxiety was negatively linked to subjective well-being, and it was positively associated with climate skepticism and pro-environmental behavior, according to the study. When preventing worry and problem-focused coping, problem-focused coping reduced the positive relationship between worry and problem-focused coping, a mediator between anxiety and pro-environmental behavior and between meaning-focused coping and behavior. Our results show that in studies on climate change worries, you should investigate various forms of anxiety and coping.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR595972


Understanding the role of climate change in disaster mortality: Empirical evidence from the Global South

While disaster death in low-income countries is highest in low-income countries, new studies mainly focus on developed countries. Here we discuss the impact attribution issue in the context of the Global South's use of disaster-specific mixed-effect regression models. The rise in landslide and flood deaths in a low-income country like Nepal between 1992 and 21 is primarily due to increased precipitation extremes. Flooding deaths by 33% have increased flood risk by 33%, and heavy rain days have increased landslide mortality by 45%.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR595716

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions