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Climate Change - Crossref

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Last Updated: 19 August 2022

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Adaptation measures to sustain indigenous practices and the use of indigenous knowledge systems to adapt to climate change in Mutoko rural district of Zimbabwe

In Mutoko's rural district of Zimbabwe, this article discusses adaptation strategies that can help indigenous people and the use of indigenous knowledge systems to adapt to climate change. Community-based adaptation is able to reduce the vulnerability of the local people to climate change and change as well as increase the local people's resilience. As such, the adoption of indigenous traditions would greatly assist rural community members in coping with climate change. The report found that many steps can be used to adapt to climate change and then to maintain indigenous practices. The study also revealed that the community no longer grows maize in large amounts, having switched to millet and sorghum in order to adapt to climate change. According to this report, the community's climate change adaptation efforts have greatly helped them to maintain their indigenous practices in several ways.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4102/jamba.v10i1.388


Social Networking on Climate Change

This paper explores the introduction of a multilingual Social Networking Platform in three European Regions of Europe's context of an EU-funded Preparatory Action on eParticipation dealing with climate change and energy policy making at the European Parliament level. The U. S. approach and a new use of social media in political online discourses are compared.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.29379/jedem.v3i1.56


Public Health Aspects of Climate Change Adaptation in Three Cities: A Qualitative Study

Climate change has an extraordinary public health issue, as it has a major effect on population health outcomes around the world. This report examined experiences and perceptions of what public health factors are considered by urban and public health planners and researchers when preparing climate change adaptation in the coastal cities of Su00f6derhamn, Porto, and Navotas through semi-structured interviews. Moreover, participants referred to different challenges: inadequate financial resources, a lack of coordination for climate change adaptation, and a lack of involvement of the public health sector in the adaptation process, particularly in one of the cities in which climate change adaptation was solely the responsibility of urban planners. Larger samples of stakeholder groups in larger cities are also needed to better understand why the public health service is still almost nonexistent in attempts to adapt to climate change.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191610292


Health Inequality among Fishery Workers during Climate Change: A National Population-Based and Retrospective Longitudinal Cohort Study

Background: It is essential to achieve sustainable growth goals for fishery workers in the face of climate change due to specific workplace cultures. However, limited studies have looked into the health of fishery workers through long-term longitudinal follow-up, comparing it to those of farmers and employees with similar socioeconomic status, which has limited findings. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was based on the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, a subset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Due to the substantial difference in baseline demographics, we conducted a cohort study with propensity score-matched and applied the Cox model to determine the participants's health status in 2019. To reduce health inequity, it is therefore vital to specifically focus on health services for fishery workers, such as providing curable antiviral therapy and establishing culture-tailored health promotion services.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191610281


Climate change denial: vulnerability and costs for Florida’s coastal destinations

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the threat of climate change in Florida's coastal destinations and the costs of adaptation in a variety of current and future scenarios. The paper presents a variety of current and forecast climate change scenarios in Florida, including Fort Lauderdale, Miami Beach, and Sarasota, as well as some of the measures adopted to date in three particularly fragile coastal locations, namely Fort Lauderdale, Miami Beach, and Sarasota. The paper discusses a number of current and forecast climate change scenarios in Florida, as well as some of the state's ongoing and predicted climate change impacts, including those that are currently endangered coastal areas, including Fort Lauderdale, Miami Beach, Miami, Miami a Originality/value This illustrative case study paper provides a detailed review of the consequences for Florida's coastal tourism destinations of rising sea levels and those that convert are more appropriate in the quest for their long-term sustainability.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1108/jhti-10-2017-0004


Attitudes to climate change risk: classification of and transitions in the UK population between 2012 and 2020

In particular, the belief that climate change is low risk has been cited as a barrier to participating in climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts. Understanding public perceptions of climate change danger is therefore an important step toward lowering emissions. Using results from the UK Household Longitudinal Study, a national survey that was conducted from 2009 to present, we used k-means cluster analysis to determine attitudes to climate change risk in the UK population. The concerned group expressed anxiety about climate change risks and recommended taking steps to minimize them. The transition matrices, on the other hand, indicated a general shift away from the Sceptical and Paradoxical clusters and toward the Concern cluster between wave 4 and wave 10. According to the findings, more targeted public information campaigns regarding climate change risk may be useful.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-022-01287-1


Quantifying uncertainty about global and regional economic impacts of climate change

Abstract A: Climate change's economic implications are highly uncertain. The vulnerability of the climate system and the so-called damage functions, which link climate change to economic harm and benefits, are two of the most significant uncertainties. Here we use different damage metrics to climate models' data, despite substantial climate sensitivities. In both climate sensitivity and economic impact per degree of rising, we find that uncertainty in both climate sension and global warming decline are of equal importance for the global economic impact, with global productivity falling between 4 and 24% in a high emission scenario by the end of the century. For example, we found that India would see a decrease in productivity between 13 and 57%, Russia an rises between 24 and 74%, and Germanys productivity shrank from 8% to a decline of 4% at the end of the century, with a high emission scenario.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ac8ab1


Global Warming and Climate Change: Science and Politics

Abstract The threat of severe climate change posed by anthropogenic global warming has decreased. Coral islands that had previously thought of drowning have increased in area. Since they are occupied kilometres-deep basins that extend below sea level, Ice caps cannot be allowed to slide into the sea. In 30 years in the Arctic, the sea ice has shown no change in 30 years. The ocean and the atmosphere are in equilibrium: if we could remove CO 2 from the atmosphere, the ocean will bring out more to restore the balance. Increasing CO 2 could make the ocean less alkaline but not acidic, but not acidic. The sun is now seen as the top climate control, but not through greenhouse gases. Solar Cycle 24 has started, and we can expect significant cooling. Many believe that scientific decisions regarding climate change are based on scientific findings, but what politicians get are computer projections.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2478/quageo-2013-0008


Outline of the problem of research into climate change on the basis of the results of ground-based meteorological observations in Poznań, Poland

A ratio between natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change is one of the key topics in the recent debate on climate change's causes. Urban areas provide the most comprehensive collection of meteorological data, which now form the basis of most studies and forecasts regarding climate change in the immediate and distant future. The most comprehensive series of meteorological records, which now form the basis of all assessments and predictions concerning climate change in the immediate and distant future, come from urban areas. The results of meteorological measurements are continuously affected by municipal growth, shifts within administrative boundaries, and even variations caused by the geographical location, the style of building construction, and the city's color. There are places around the world, mainly in tropical latitudes, where the city is cooler than the surrounding areas, which results in the occurrence of a urban cold island.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10117-010-0009-2

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions