Advanced searches left 3/3

Climate Change - Arxiv

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 19 September 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Avoiding the "Great Filter": An Assessment of Climate Change Solutions and Combinations for Effective Implementation

Climate change is the long-term change in global weather patterns, largely due to human activity of greenhouse gas emissions. Global climate temperatures have unmistakably increased, although naturally occurring climate variability alone cannot account for this trend. Human activities are expected to have caused about 1. 0 degree C of global warming above the pre-industrial average, and if left unchecked, could continue to drastically harm the Earth and its inhabitants. Natural disasters and subsequent economic loss have become more significant due to climate change. Both wildlife habitats and human habitats have been negatively affected by rising sea levels and the increased frequency of severe weather events around the world. For avoiding the most damaging effects of climate change, collaboration is clearly needed. This paper examines the most common responses for both combating and adapting to climate change.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2205.00133v2


Growing polarisation around climate change on social media

Following poor polarization between COP20 and COP25, we reveal a significant rise in ideological polarization during COP26. During COP26, we obtain a wide variety of climate contrarian" views, undermining the issue of cross-ideological relevance; contrarian views and allegations of hypocrisy have emerged as primary topics in the Twitter climate debate since 2019. Our findings reveal the importance of tracking polarization and its impacts in the public climate debate, with future climate action hinged on COP27 and beyond.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2112.12137v4


Impact of humanity on climate change

The thermodynamic approach shows that human civilization's total energy balance upsets the planet's thermal balance and contributes to countermeasures, namely climate change, which may slow civilization's progress. The determination of the average temperature of the Earth is based on its energy balance and includes the use of the Stefan-Boltzmann equation.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2207.13694v2


A meta-analysis of the total economic impact of climate change

The central estimate of global warming is always negative, with earlier meta-analyses of the economic consequences of climate change updating with more data. Studies on the effect of weather shocks reveal that studies linking economic growth to temperature rise are ineffective, but studies that attribute the change in temperature vary by a factor of magnitude. According to climate change's effect on economic growth, the effect on economic growth that has been predicted is close to that estimated as a result of weather shocks. The social cost of carbon follows a similar pattern to total impact estimates, but with more emphasis on moderate warming in the near and medium term.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2207.12199v3


A Model of Mass Extinction Accounting for Species's Differential Evolutionary Response to a Catastrophic Climate Change

Mass extinction is a phenomenon on Earth where a large number of species go extinct in a short period of time. In this paper, we propose a new numerical model that incorporates two aspects that have been largely ignored in mass extinction literature, namely, active responses of phytoplankton to the climate by changing the albedo of the ocean surface and the species's adaptive evolutionary response to climate change. We show that whether species goes extinct or not depending on a subtle interaction between the climate change scale and the rate of evolutionary responses. When the species population density remains at a low level for a long time before returning to its healthy steady state value, we also show that species's reaction to a fast climate change can exhibit long-term dynamics.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2208.12792v1


Protection gaps in Amazon floodplains will increase with climate change: Insight from the world's largest scaled freshwater fish

Although climate change is likely to jeopardize the effectiveness of the Amazon basin's covered area network, floodplains are exposed to significant impacts of climate change, but are excluded from species distribution schemes and protection gap assessments, although species distribution models and protection gap analyses are still lacking. We simulated the current and future delivery of the massive bony-tongue fish Arapaima sp. To find spatial conservation inequities, we also analyzed the amount of suitable environment that exists within and outside the new network of protected areas. During the high-water stage, 16. 6% decline in environmental suitability was predicted by climate change, and 19. 4% during the low-water stage. Around 70% of the Arapaima sp. 's suitable climates were found by our researchers. We highlight security in the southwestern area of the basin and recommend that the existing network of protected areas in the upper Ucayali, Juru, and Purus Rivers and their tributaries be extended.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2202.05142v3


Climate Change and Astronomy: A Look at Long-Term Trends on Maunakea

Maunakea is one of the world's largest observator sites for astronomical observation, with many telescopes operating from sub-millimeter to optical wavelengths. Maunakea is an ideal position for astronomy due to the summit's relatively dry, stable atmosphere, and little turbulence above the summit, with its summit above 4200 meters above sea level. We've explored how the summit conditions have shifted in recent decades since the site was first selected as an observatory location, but we''re curious how the summit conditions have changed in recent decades, and how future-proof the site can continue to evolve. Maximum wind speeds have increased over the past decade, but we do now know that maximum wind speeds have increased over the past decade, with the frequency of wind speeds above 15 ms ^-1 increasing by 1-2%, which could have a major effect on ground-layer turbulence.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2208.11794v1


The Interactions of Social Norms about Climate Change: Science, Institutions and Economics

We investigate how climate change in different groups of the population is changing and how actors' motivations influence one another. We first document the evolution individually and then provide a map of cross influences among them that we then estimate with a VAR.

Source link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2208.09239v1

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions