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Chronic Pain - MedlinePlus Genetics

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 26 April 2022

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Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a common disorder with long-lasting pain affecting several areas of the body. People with fibromyalgia often experience new forms of pain, such as headaches, back and neck pain, sore throat, pain, or clicking in the jaw, as well as stomach pain or digestive disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. However, many people with fibromyalgia do not have a mental illness. The key signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia can be present or combined with another chronic pain disorder, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/fibromyalgia


Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency

Some people with corregular deficiency have only one or two of these characteristics; others have no signs or symptoms of the condition and are only recognized after a relative is found to be affected. Chronic exhaustion syndrome is common among people with corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency syndromes. Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic illness that affects daily activities, as well as general signs, such as sore throat or headaches, are common features of chronic fatigue syndrome.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/corticosteroid-binding-globulin-deficiency


Hypophosphatasia

Hypophosphataemia is an inherited disorder that affects bone and teeth development. Hypophosphatasia reduces and softens the bones, resulting in skeletal abnormalities similar to another childhood bone disorder called rickets. Hypophosphataedipasia that arise in childhood or adulthood are usually less prevalent than those that occur in infancy. One of the first signs of the disease in children is early loss of primary teeth. Children impacted by traumatic injuries may have short stature, enlarged wrist and ankle joints, and an abnormal skull shape. Chronic pain can be exacerbated by repeated fractures in the foot and thigh bones in adults. Adults affected by chronic tooth loss can lose their secondary teeth early and are at an increased risk of joint pain and inflammation. People with this disorder typically experience abnormal tooth growth and tooth loss, but not have the same skeletal abnormalities seen in other forms of hypophosphatasia.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hypophosphatasia


Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy

Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is a condition characterized by episodes of intense pain and muscle wasting in one or both shoulders and arms. Neuralgic pain is felt along one or two nerves and has no identifiable physical cause. The brachial plexus, a network of nerves involved in hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy, controls movement and sensation in the shoulders and arms. People with hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy usually get attacks in their twenties, but in some cases, episodes have occurred as early as one year old. The pain can be difficult to cope with medication and generally lasts about a month. Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades "stick out" from the back, a common sign of scapular winging. Enhanced sensation and abnormal sensations in the skin such as numbness or tingling are among the indications of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy. Individuals with hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy have peculiar physical signs, such as short stature, excess skin folds on the neck and arms, an opening in the roof of the mouth, a split in the soft flap of tissue hanging from the back of the throat, and partially webbed or fused fingers or toes.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hereditary-neuralgic-amyotrophy


Depression

Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects mood, behaviour, and overall health. Changes in appetite, changes in sleeping patterns, lack of sleep, and difficulty concentrating can all be associated with depression. Although depression is primarily a mental health disorder, it can also have physical signs such as headaches, other unexplained aches and pains, unusually slow or fast movements, and digestive problems. If untreated, episodes of depression can last weeks, months, or years, and they can go away and come back. People with depression have a higher risk of substance use issues and suicide by suicide than the general population. Many health disorders are closely related to depression or have depression as a typical feature. People with schizoaffective disorder, anxiety, or another mood disorder are often diagnosed with schizophrenia symptomatics.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/depression


Melorheostosis

Melorheostosis is a rare bone disease. The excess bone growth most commonly occurs on one arm or leg, but it can also affect the pelvis, breastbone, ribs, or other bones. Melorheostosis causes abnormal bone formation that does not progress from one bone to another, according to the author. Melorheostosis is a disorder that occurs in childhood or adolescence. In some people, the limbs may have enlarged or enlarged, while the skin overlying the affected area can become red, thick, and shiny. Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome is characterized by skin changes known as connective tissue nevi and areas of increased bone density called osteopoikilosis. A small number of people affected individuals may also have melorheostosis or other bone abnormalities. Scientists speculated that melorheostosis that occurs without the other characteristics of Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome may have the same genetic cause as the disorder.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/melorheostosis


Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome

Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome is a hereditary disorder that mostly affects the skin and bones. Specifically, the condition is characterized by skin growths termed connective tissue nevi and bone abnormalities, most commonly a pattern of elevated bone density, osteopoikilosis. Connective tissue nevi are small, noncancerous lumps on the skin. Less often, patients have nevi called collagenomas, which are made from another form of connective tissue, collagen. Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome is also present in other bone abnormalities, but they are less common. For example, a small percentage of affected people have melorheostosis, which is characterized by excess bone growth on the surface of existing bones in a pattern similar to dripping candle wax. Melorheostosis is most common among bones in one arm or leg, but it can also affect bones in other areas of the body.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/buschke-ollendorff-syndrome


Intervertebral disc disease

Intervertebral disc disease is a common disorder characterized by the degeneration of one or two discs that separate the bones of the spine, causing pain in the back or neck, as well as commonly in the legs and arms. Although disc degeneration in the spine's lower region of the spine is most common in intervertebral disc disease, any area of the spine can have disc degeneration. Intervertebral disc disease may cause periodic or chronic pain in the back or neck, depending on the location of the affected disc or discs. The protruding disc can press against one of the spinal nerves that run from the spinal cord to the remainder of the body, and degenerative discs are susceptible to out-pouching. If the bone spurs compression of the spinal cord, affected individuals can have issues with walking, bladder, and bowel control, as shown by the above.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/intervertebral-disc-disease


Fabry disease

Fabry disease is an inherited disorder that results from the synthesis of a specific form of fat, globotriaosylceramide, in the body's cells. In addition, Fabry disease can also cause potentially life-threatening illnesses such as progressive kidney disease, heart attack, and stroke. Some affected individuals have milder cases of the illness that arise later in life and affect only the heart or kidneys.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/fabry-disease

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions