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Cervical Cancer - Crossref

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Last Updated: 19 June 2022

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Abstract PO-265: The intersection of sexual orientation with race and ethnicity in cervical cancer screening: Results from the National Health Interview Survey

"Abstract Objectives: Cervical cancer screening is recommended for those with a cervix aged 21-65," according to individual risk. People belonging to sexual minority groups could have elevated risk factors for cancer while still being less likely to participate in cancer screening. We compared cervical cancer screening rates by sexual orientation, as well as intersectional studies of race/ethnicity. When compared to heterosexual counterparts, SM participants were younger, less likely to be living with a partner, had less likely to have a medical clinic, were less likely to have regular health services, and were more likely to delay medical care due to cost. Compared to heterosexual individuals, SM people had notably reduced odds of ever undergoing Pap testing. When considering the intersection of sexual orientation and ethnicity, heterosexual Hispanic, SM NH white, and SM Hispanic participants were all less likely to ever performing Pap testing when compared to NH white heterosexual participants. There were no significant differences reported between heterosexual and SM participants of NH Black or white identities. When compared to heterosexual participants, participants who identifie as SM were considerably less likely to have undergone a Pap test. The National Health Interview Survey (abstract) found that sexual orientation is interrelated with race and ethnicity in cervical cancer screening. In: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 2021, October 6-8; AACR Virtual Conference on Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 14th AACR Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial Minorities and the Medically Underserved, 14th AACR Conference on the AACR Virtual Conference on the 2021 AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of the Medically, : In: The Scientific Disparities and the Medically In: The AACR Virtual Conference on the Medically Underserved;.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-265


Abstract PO-065: Increasing breast and cervical cancer knowledge during COVID-19 pandemic in collaboration with Cooperative Extension Program

"Abstract Introduction: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Breast Cancer Screening Program reported that in April 2020, screening tests for breast cancer decreased by 87% and 84%, relative to the previous 5-year averages. The Puerto Rico Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Program, in collaboration with the Cooperative Extension Program, introduced an educational program of breast and cervical cancer in the island's northeast region. Methodology: Since 2017, the PR-BCCPEDP decided to implement educational programs for breast and cervical cancer in 4 of CEP's regions around the island's regions. Seven CEP Family and Consumer Educators carried out 8 educational programs in the island's northeast region from February to May 2021, with 182 participants. Similarly, Pap tests, 30. 7% reported that they had not had not had a Pap test in the last three years, of which 87. 5% were allowed to be contacted. According to the PR-BCCPEDP, 3. 6 percent of the women without health insurance were referred to the service, and of these, 50% were accepted. More than a third of the participants did not have their mammogram or Pap done because of the Pandemic, with breast and cervical cancer screening. In:: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Inserved; 2021, Oct 6-8. ".

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-065


Abstract PO-015: An examination of the implementation of a navigation patient navigation program to improve breast and cervical cancer screening rates of Chinese immigrant women

"Abstract Background: National breast cancer incidences for female breast cancer and cervical cancer in 2020 were 78% and 81%, respectively. The Chinese Americans have lower breast and cervical cancer screening rates than the national average. Respectively, the breast and cervical cancer screening rates for Chinese American women from Chicago's Chinatown are between 60% and 47 percent. Patient navigators have improved screening and follow-up rates for medically underserved populations, but studies into cancer navigation services and their implementation among Chinese Americans are limited. Lesson's recommendation to future patient navigation services is that patient navigators should be able to educate patients at all stages of care, from planning to follow-up, pharmaceutical quality, and end-users need ongoing and frequent communication about the navigator's duties before the program was launched, and administrative deficiencies, e. g. , infrastructure, and staff limitations can prevent the navigation process from being implemented. These findings reveal valuable information regarding the development of future patient navigation services for Chinese American and other limited-English speaking immigrant groups. In: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 2021, October 6-8; AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-015


Abstract PO-005: Geospatial hotspot analysis of cervical cancer among Asian American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander (AANHPI) population in Los Angeles County

In studies that include this heterogeneous population, this extremely diverse group of Asian American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander women is often overlooked. In Los Angeles County, we investigated cervical cancer clusters among the ethnic subgroups of AANHPI women. Methods: Among AANHPI's Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program's first primary cancer patients with any stage of cervical cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2018 are among the first primary cancer cases diagnosed from 2000 to 2018. In Los Angeles County, we conducted hotspot experiments using the Getis-Ord GI*statistic in ArcGIS to compare the distribution of statistically significant clusters of cervical cancer cases using a single population. Discussion: Our results geospatially disaggregate the cervical cancer prevalence among AANHPI residents in Los Angeles County by ethnic subgroups. [abstract]: In Los Angeles County's Asian American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander population, a cervical cancer hotspot analysis of cervical cancer among Asian American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander peoples [abstract] [abstract]. ".

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-005


Abstract PR-14: A synergy between the vaginal microbiome and HPV may have explanatory value for racial disparities in risk of pre-cervical cancer

"Abstract" is a key player in the emergence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in the high-risk Human Papilloma Virus infection persistence, resulting in the formation of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Although it is widely agreed that the VMB of women with CIN differs from that of healthy women, the VMB composition before a woman's CIN is not well understood. In addition, no studies have looked at the effect of self-reported race on the VMB-CIN relationship, despite the fact that non-Latina Black women generally have increased microbial diversity and lower prevalence of taxa such as Lactobacillus in comparison to their non-Latina White counterparts. Despite sharing a similar number of HPV infections to Whites, Black women have higher HPV prevalence than Whites and more persistent HPV infections. Methods: We used 16S-RNA profiles from the Virginia Commonwealth University clinics for their annual routine examination between August 2009 and November 2013. In crude estimates, the risk of CIN was 80 percent higher for Black women than to Whites. However, a significant correlation between HPV status and the VMB showed that the danger for Whites in the event of a CIN diagnosis for HPV+ Black women with the u201cOther U201d VMB subtype, which is five-fold higher than those for Whites. A synergy between the vaginal microbiome and HPV may have explanatory value in terms of racial disparities in the risk of pre-cervical cancer [abstract]. In:: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Raethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, 1021 to 2021.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-pr-14


Abstract PO-068: Cervical cancer and HPV knowledge and awareness: An educational intervention among college students in Guam

"Abstract" is the word used to describe cervical cancer in Guam, a United States territory in the Western Pacific, six times higher than Micronesians and more than three times higher for CHamorus and Caucasians living in Guam than the United States population. Educational interventions among college students who can still get the HPV vaccine, particularly among women under the age of initial CCA screening, are highly recommended. As the variables were calculated using the CCA and HPV Knowledge and Awareness as the dependent variables, the dependent variables were determined by three individual one-way ANOVAs with gender, ethnicity, and class level. From pre- to post-test, there was a substantial rise in all independent variables in CCA and HPV Knowledge and Awareness. The McNemar test revealed that there are significant positive differences in the proportion of correct responses to most of the questions between the pre- and posttest groups. This type of educational intervention for CCA is particularly relevant for this age group because most can still obtain the HPV vaccine and women are at the age of initial CCA screening. According to this report, the college environment is an ideal place to raise CCA and HPV awareness, as well as the effects of HPV vaccination for females. Cervical cancer and HPV knowledge and awareness among college students in Guam [abstract]. 2021-10-10; 2021, Oct. 6-8; Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Inserved; the 14th AACR Conference on Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Poored; 14th AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-068


Abstract PO-231: Exploring social vulnerability in locally advanced cervical cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy irradiation

"Despite being the gold standard of care, brachytherapy as an essential component of definitive irradiation is not successfully carried out by many patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. " From 66 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer from 2016 to 2021 who underwent brachytherapy as part of their care, data was obtained from 66 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer from 2016 to 2021. In this group, the median SVI value when comparing patients to all census tracts in the United States was 0. 39. With an SVI of 0. 96, followed by African American 0. 86, American Indian or Alaska Native 0. 30, and Caucasian 0. 29, Asian patients were most vulnerable, according to the SVI's estimates, whereas African American 0. 86, American Indian or Alaska Native 0. 30, and Caucasian 0. 29. Asian patients were the most vulnerable in socioeconomic status, with an SVI of 0. 93, in minority status and language with an SVI of 0. 90, and in housing and transportation with an SVI of 0. 97. With an SVI of 0. 78, African American patients were the most vulnerable in household composition and disability. Among minority patients with cervical cancer, we found a significant difference in social vulnerability. A further investigation into the causes causing disparities among cervical cancer patients can help properly allocate funds and ensure that these patients get optimal treatment leading to improved outcomes. [abstract]: Exploring social vulnerability in locally advanced cervical cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy irradiation [abstract]. In:: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Raethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 2021, Oct 6-8.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-231


Abstract PO-238: Implementing a culturally-appropriate biospecimen collection protocol during the COVID-19 pandemic to address cervical cancer disparities among Native American women

"Abstract Background: Native American women have twice the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in comparison to non-Hispanic white women. " Although infection with high-risk HPV genotypes is a well-known risk factor for cervical cancer, there are other factors that contribute to cervical carcinogenesis. Consequently, the aim of the pilot project is to investigate the role of the vaginal microbiome and inflammation in cervical cancer pathogenesis among Native American women. Recruitment was slow at the beginning of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. We therefore produced culturally tailored recruitment flyers that were widely distributed on social media. In addition, we produced a culturally appropriate video on the value of the well woman's exam as a result of the NACA clinic and researchers at the NACA clinic and researchers at the joint venture for Native American Cancer Prevention, which will be announced in the coming weeks. Participants had successfully enroll participants since March 2020 with survey results integrated into REDCap, thus far. Conclusion: In summary, the continuing efforts by the NACA staff and research team resulted in successful recruiting for the pilot study during the COVID-19 pandemic. Native American women will be able to determine the role of the VMB and HPV-mediated cancer in Native American women, according to this report. [abstract]: Implementing a culturally appropriate biospecimen collection protocol during the COVID-19 pandemic to combat cervical cancer disparities among Native American women [abstract]. In:: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Raethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 2021, Oct 6-8. ".

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-238


Abstract PO-251: Cervical screening in Latinas of 20-24 years old: findings from the Brazilian cervical cancer information system

"Abstract Introduction: The Brazilian National Cancer Institute confirms cervical cancer screening should be carried out every year in women aged 25 to 64 years, and then every three years after two consecutive negative exams. However, the first sexual activity in Latinas occurs in late adolescence, aged 15 to 19 years old. Hence, the aim of this research was to examine cervical cytopathological changes with suspicion of malignancy and/or increased risk of breast cancer among Brazilian women aged 20 to 24 years old. The indefinite squamous cell cell, high-grade indeterminate glandular cell, high-grade intraepithelial lesion, intraepithelial lesion, intraepithelial lesion, acute squamous cell carcinoma, invasive adenocarcinoma, and other neoplasms were present in this pattern. The total number of cervical cancer screening tests in Brazil varied from 2006 to 2015. The results may have been published because of the precociousness of sexual initiation and a multiplicity of sexual partners can expose women to human papillomavirus at a young age, which may explain the findings. The Brazilian cervical cancer information system [abstract] reported cervical cancer screening in Latinas 20-24 years old, resulting in cervical cancer screening [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the AACR Virtual Conference on the Science of Cancer Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved; 2021, Oct 6-8.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-251


Abstract PO-252: Impact of COVID-19 public policies on utilization on cervical cancer screening in Puerto Rico during March 15, 2020 to July 31, 2020

"Abstract Introduction: "Abstract Introduction: "Abstract Introduction: Puerto Rico has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in the United States, and cervical cancer screening is below 80%. " Public health issues have an effect on people's access to health care services. We investigated the effects of Puerto Rico's public policy during the first 5 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the use of CCS for participants of the Government's Public Health Plan. Conclusion: Our findings show how the public policy that was introduced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in Puerto Rico had a direct effect on the utilization of CCS services in this Hispanic population. [abstract]: "The impact of COVID-19 public policies on cervical cancer screening in Puerto Rico from March 15, 2020 to July 31, 2020 [abstract]] is unclear. ".

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1158/1538-7755.disp21-po-252

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions