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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Chronic granulomatous disease

Individuals with chronic granulomatous disease may have recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. People with this disorder may also have inflammation in various tissues that may lead to tissue damage. Chronic granulomatous disease is generally present in childhood, although some people do not show signs until later in life. At least one significant bacterial or fungal infection is typical for people with chronic granulomatous disease in the United States every 3 to four years. Individuals with persistent granulomatous disease may experience a form of fungal pneumonia, with fever and shortness of breath after exposure to decaying organic materials such as mulch, hay, or dead leaves. People with persistent granulomatous disease and the multitude of fungi involved in their decomposition can develop fungal infections in their lungs. The skin, liver, and lymph nodes are all typical areas of infection in people with chronic granulomatous disease. In people with chronic granulomatous disease, inflammation can occur in a variety of areas of the body. The stomach, colon, and rectum, as well as the mouth, throat, and skin are among the many common areas of inflammation in people with chronic granulomatous disease. Inflammation in the stomach can stop food from moving into the intestines, causing an inability to digest food. Rarely, people with chronic granulomatous disease suffer autoimmune disorders, which arise when the immune system malfunctions and invades the body's own tissues and organs.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/chronic-granulomatous-disease


Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome

In early childhood, IPEX syndrome can be life-threatening. Almost all people with IPEX syndrome suffer from autoimmune enteropathy, a gastrointestinal disease associated with the intestines. Autoimmune enteropathy occurs when certain cells in the intestines are destroyed by a person's immune system, resulting in autoimmune enteropathy. Autoimmune enteropathy is a condition that occurs in the first few months of life. People with IPEX syndrome commonly experience skin inflammation, which is known as dermatitis. Eczema is the most common dermatitis of this disorder, and it causes abnormal patches of red, irritated skin. IPEX syndrome can also have other skin disorders that cause similar symptoms. Multiple disorders of the endocrine glands can be present in IPEX syndrome, which may include polyendocrinopathy. Type 1 diabetes mellitus, an autoimmune disease involving the pancreas, is the most common endocrine disorder among people with IPEX syndrome. People with IPEX syndrome may also have autoimmune thyroid disease. The thyroid gland, which is located in the lower neck, produces hormones, is a butterfly-shaped organ. Individuals with IPEX syndrome are likely to experience other autoimmune disorders in addition to those that affect the intestines, skin, and endocrine glands. Autoimmune blood disorders are common; about half of those people have low levels of red blood cells, platelets, or specific white blood cells because these cells are attacked by the immune system. IPEX syndrome affects liver and kidneys in several people.

Source link: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/immune-dysregulation-polyendocrinopathy-enteropathy-x-linked-syndrome

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions