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Celiac Disease - Springer Nature

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Last Updated: 28 April 2022

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Does contrast-enhanced computed tomography raise awareness in the diagnosis of the invisible side of celiac disease in adults?

On computed tomography and additional CT results, this study sought to establish and measure major and minor celiac disease symptoms in the small intestine and colon. Methods This retrospective review was done with 116 patients diagnosed with CD, 14 CD patients undergoing treatment, and 35 non-CD patients. In CD patients, the distribution of CT findings according to pathological Marsh results was investigated. More than 7 MDCT findings, 100% sensitivity, and 92% specificity were found in the ROC analysis of each MDCT findings reported between the groups, with 100% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Conclusions: Being aware of CT findings below the iceberg, which may indicate CD in abdominal CT examinations performed in patients with atypical clinical and malabsorption findings or other nonspecific findings, may avoid diagnostic delay and unnecessary procedures.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00261-022-03480-x


In a large Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) cohort, concomitant celiac disease is associated with family history of autoimmunity and a more severe JIA course: a retrospective study

History In patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, celiac disease has an elevated incidence relative to the general population. The aim of this report, which was designed to determine the prevalence of CD in a large Southern Italian cohort of children with JIA, assess risk factors related to their co-occurrence. 87. 5% patients with JIA and CD were diagnosed by 87. 5% of those without CD, relative to 45. 8% of those without CD. Both a conventional Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drug and a biological DMARD were needed by 85. 5% of patients with JIA and CD, as well as a 36 percent of those without CD. Conclusion In a large JIA cohort, a higher CD prevalence was found, indicating the importance of CD screening in all JIA children, especially those with a family history of autoimmunity, was found to be related to the co-occurrence of the two diseases.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12969-022-00689-4


Maternal breast milk microbiota and immune markers in relation to subsequent development of celiac disease in offspring

In children with celiac disease, the potential effects of maternal breast milk composition is uncertain. During follow-up for the first three years of life, the aim of our study was to compare the microbiota composition and the presence of immune markers in breast milk from mothers whose offspring had the genetic predisposition to CD, as well as whether they did or did not have CD during follow-up. The samples [CD children and healthy children] were collected three months after delivery. Both the Shannon'H' diversity index and Phylotype abundance were both significantly elevated in breast milk samples in the CD group. The microbiota in breast milk from mothers of genetically predisposed offsprings, as well as a different bacterial composition, were found in conclusion, as compared to mothers of unaffected offspring.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-10679-x


Biochemical abnormalities among patients referred for celiac disease antibody blood testing in a primary health care setting

To examine potential biochemical abnormalities associated with celiac disease antibody positivity in a primary health care setting and thereby identify predictors that could save diagnostic delay and underdiagnosis of CDs. This observational cohort study included measurements of CD antibodies in the Copenhagen Primary Care Laboratory database from 2000 to 2015; CD antibody positivity was defined as tissue transglutaminase antibody IgG or IgG 7 kU/L and/or deamidated gliadin peptide antibody IgG 10 kU/L. We investigated differences between individuals with positive and negative CD antibody antibodies testing the results of biochemical tests carried out six months before and one month after the date of the CD antibody test was conducted. Several biochemical abnormalities related to CD antibody positivity among individuals referred to CD antibody testing were discovered in this study.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-10492-6


Nutrient intake differs among persons with celiac disease and gluten-related disorders in the United States

Individuals with celiac disease may have nutritional deficiencies, while those following a gluten-free diet may lack essential nutrients. In the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2014, we looked at nutrient intake from diet and supplements among people with CD and GFD. People without a CD who are allergic to gluten are likely to a GFD without a diagnosis of CD. Vitamin A and E intakes were higher among people with diagnosed CD, while those with undiagnosed CD had an elevated intake of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, copper, sodium, potassium, calcium, potassium, folic acid, and choline. Total energy and macronutrient intake in the United States population over a six-year period was reduced among people with diagnosed CD, while those with undiagnosed CD's intake of total energy, macronutrients, and multiple micronutrients increased.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-09346-y


IgA Deficiency Is Not Systematically Ruled Out in Patients Undergoing Celiac Disease Testing

Background: The IgA determination in celiac disease testing is based on total serum IgA determination alongside anti-transglutaminase IgA antibodies. Aim In patients screened for celiac disease, the absence of serum IgA determination is determined by the CDC. Methods and Methods We reviewed all patients who underwent serum anti-transglutaminase IgA and/or other CD-related antibodies testing at a joint teaching hospital in Buenos Aires from October 2019 to February 2020. To select adult patients who had been screened for celiac disease, medical records were reviewed. Because of a lack of serum IgA test results, the most important outcome was the percentage of patients with inadequate diagnostic for celiac disease. The prevalence of serum IgA determination was 20. 4 percent. The prevalence of IgA deficiency in patients who did not have serum IgA testing was 5. 1 percent. Conclusion IgA deficiency is not systematically ruled out in a significant number of patients undergoing celiac disease serological testing.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-021-06939-x


Evaluation of Serum Levels of Copper and Zinc in Patients with Celiac Disease Seropositivity: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

This research, according to Then, it will investigate the connection between celiac disease seropositivity and serum zinc and copper levels. Using the tissue transglutaminase IgA antibody test, Celiac disease seropositivity was established. The results were determined by multivariable linear regression models with celiac disease seropositivity as a predictor, with serum zinc and copper levels as predictors. The weighted prevalence of celiac disease seropositivity in children aged 6–19 years was higher among children aged 6–19 years than among adults aged 20 years. The multivariable linear regression analysis found that in children aged 6 to 19 years, celiac disease seropositivity was associated with a 5. 32 g/dL lower serum zinc level, but not related to serum copper level. However, the connection between celiac disease seropositivity and serum zinc level was not statistically significant among adults aged 20 years or older.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-022-03212-8


Gluten consumption and inflammation affect the development of celiac disease in at-risk children

We set out to determine the risk of developing CD in children with the amount of gluten intake and the serum inflammatory profile in genetically predisposed infants. We enrolled 27 children who were at risk for CD and 56 controls matched by gender and age, with 27 children in an Italian cohort at risk for CD. An increase in serum cytokines at 4 months of age before gluten introduction was discovered in infants who had CD by 6 years. Gluten consumption in the second year of life was significantly higher in the second year of life than in controls, and in CD cases, only in CD cases was strongly related to serum cytokines. At 4 months before gluten intake, genetically impaired infants who developed CD had a unique serum cytokine profile. In infants who had CD, the amount of gluten was strongly correlated with an inflammatory profile in serum cytokines at 36 months only.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-09232-7

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions