Advanced searches left 3/3

Celiac Artery - DOAJ

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 15 January 2023

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Treatment strategies for unruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms associated with celiac artery occlusion

Abstract The artery occlusion or stenosis has been present in up to half of all patients undergoing abdominal angiography, and the increased collateral blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery to the pancreaticoduodenal artery may cause PDA aneurysms. CA obstruction, we have four patients who underwent surgery for unruptured PDAAs causing by CA obstruction. The CA region was first established by bypassing the splenic artery and anastomosing it either directly to the left renal artery or via a graft. Multiple PDAAs were administered in a single patient with PDAAs of similar size and shape, but only the most significant PDAA with the highest risk of rupture was treated in the other two patients to simplify the procedure. Patients with unruptured PDAAs may be a viable option for treating patients with unruptured PDAAs.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1002/ags3.12609


A major pain in the … Back and epigastrium: an unusual case of spontaneous celiac artery dissection

A 60-year-old woman with a chronic low back pain, chronic low back pain, and a 30-pack-year smoke history was accepted for her second admission of poorly controlled mid-back pain ten days after her first admission. She had concomitant epigastric pain, explosive/burning in quality, radiating to the right and to the mid-back, not related to diet or pain relief, and no pain relief was found with pain relievers. Except for a hemoglobin drop from 14 to 12. 1 g/dL over two days, labs were normal except for a hemoglobin drop of 14 to 12. 1 g/dL in less than two days. The epigastric pain was caused by a spontaneous celiac artery dissection, according to a Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic scan. The patient was discovered without stenting, and subsequent CT angiography did not reveal worsening of the dissection. So far, there have been less than 100 cases of isolated spontaneous celiac artery dissections.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3402/jchimp.v4.23840


General features, management strategies, and outcomes of symptomatic spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection

paraphrasedoutput:Methods. This study, which was retrospectively distributed from January 2018 to December 2021, a total of symptomatic SICAD patients with symptomatic SICAD were retrospectively included in this research. Two patients were required for secondary intervention during a follow-up to the conservative company, wherein one underwent a stent placement three months after discharge due to increased symptoms and extension of dissection, and the other required intervention one month after discharge due to symptomatic progression. paraphrasedoutput:Conclusion. Patients with symptomatic SICAD who were selectively treated with conservative intervention or endovascular therapy had more frequent early and medium-term results than those in the conservative group.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2022.972276


Ramification of Celiac artery in the pine marten (Martes martes)

The pine marten is a medium-sized carnivore that is uncommonly found in Iran. The pine marten is a medium-sized carnivore. The common trunk of the splenic and left gastric arteries, among others, was a thick branch, particularly the hepatic artery. Two left gastroepiploic arteries in the examined pine marten were discovered, one from the splenic and the other from the left gastric artery. In the pine martens, this is the first study on the ramification of the celiac artery. This is the first study on ramifications of the celiac artery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.22067/veterinary.v8i2.54842


Percutaneous retrograde revascularization of chronic occlusions of the superior mesenteric artery via collaterals of the celiac artery

Purpose The aim of this paper is to examine the surgical achievement of percutaneous retrograde revascularization of the superior mesenteric artery via the celiac artery in patients with persistent mesenteric ischemia. When antegrade recanalization fails as far as it can be determined from the small number of reported cases, it seems to be a safe endovascular solution for patients with CMI and a chronicly occluded superior mesenteric artery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s42155-020-00170-x


Distal pancreatectomy and celiac axis resection for pancreatic body carcinoma involving celiac artery

We present the case of a 45-year-old man with pancreatic body cancer invading the celiac axis who underwent DP-CAR with negative margins and then followed uneventful postoperative course in this article. We also reviewed the literature, which unequivocally shows a similar oncological result between pancreatic body or tail cancer with and without celiac artery resection.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.4103/fjs.fjs_10_17


Self-limiting Spontaneous Isolated Celiac Artery Dissection: A Case Report

Introduction: The isolated dissection of the celiac artery is extremely unusual, with less than 100 cases reported to date. Although some patients complain with epigastric pain and tenderness, many of them are asymptomatic and found coincidently on CT. It's unclear how to treat isolated celiac artery dissections. This paper presents an observational approach to a symptomatic case of isolated celiac artery dissection. Report: A 55-year-old Caucassian male with epigastric pains was admitted to the emergency department by a five-year-old Caucassian male with epigastric pains. Despite this, normal liver transaminases showed no signs of ischemic hepatitis. The intramural hematoma and improved patency of the hepatic artery were present in the 3 week sequel to CTA's spontaneous resolution. Conclusion: This case shows that an observational approach to cases of isolated celiac artery dissection may be suggested, particularly in the case where there is no apparent end organ disease or malperfusion.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvssr.2015.08.003


Multidetector-row computed tomography for evaluating the branching angle of the celiac artery: a descriptive study

Abstract Background We undertook this research in order to determine the shape of the celiac artery in maximum intensity projection using routine 64 multidetector-row computed tomography data in order to prepare for the installation of an intra-arterial port device. Methods The diagnosis of Hepatocellular carcinoma was found in a total of 1,104 patients with MDCT. For the installation of an intra-arterial hepatic port device in patients with branching angles of 150 degrees or more, a subterraned arterial route was used. In 2 patients with a dramatic decline branching, the subcutaneous arterial route was used for the introduction of an intra-arterial hepatic port system. Conclusions The celiac artery's branching angle can be determined by the processing of MIP images from routine MDCT results. MIP can be useful in the selection of the catheter insertion route in order to prevent a prominent branching angle of the celiac artery.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2342-12-36


Spontaneous cessation of postpancreatectomy hemorrhage in a patient with celiac artery stenosis

Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage, which is a common complication of pancreatic surgery, is a serious complication of pancreatic surgery. In our article, we show unusual occurrence of spontaneous cessation of severe postpancreatectomy common hepatic artery hemorrhage after distal pancreatectomy in a patient with celiac artery stenosis. A 64-year-old male with a pancreatic tail tumor underwent extended distal pancreatectomy. When considering interventional radiology procedures, vascular anomalies must be considered. Patients with CAS may be sacrificed with no ischemic consequences in the case of significant hemorrhage in patients with CAS.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2022.05.066


A Missed Celiac Artery Aneurysm Leading to Rupture: A Case Report

We report a case of celiac artery aneurysm in a male patient who complained of abdominal pains to the ED on two separate occasions, about 24 hours apart. Case Report: After computed tomography imaging and laboratory tests, the patient was released with undifferentiated abdominal pain on the first visit. Conclusion: Although rare, abdominal pain caused by CAAs can quickly progress to rupture and cause a high risk of death.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5811/cpcem.2020.6.46513

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions