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Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis - Europe PMC

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Last Updated: 16 April 2022

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Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis after minor head trauma : A case report

Thrombosis is a rare but life-threatening condition that often results from infections such as paranasal sinusitis, otitis media, and skin infections. We present a case of SCST complicated by meningitis after minor head injury, even in the absence of identifiable fractures. Patient concerns and diagnosis: A 77-year-old female was diagnosed with diplopia, eye pain, and headache lasting a week. Based on scientific, laboratory, and neuroradiological findings, a preliminary diagnosis of SCST complicated by bacterial meningitis and multifocal cerebral venous thrombosis was established. Intervention: An Intravenous triple antibiotic therapy for 2 weeks was started with methylprednisolone and methylprednisolone. Therefore, coil embolization was carried out successfully for the treatment of carotid-cavernous fistula. During the 8-month follow-up period, the patient's symptoms, including diplopia, gradually improved. Lessons: Minor head injury is a rare but possibly cause of SCST.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/PMC8913101


Clinical Profile and Long-Term Outcomes in Pediatric Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis.

Background Pediatric cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare disorder with little information regarding its clinical signs and long-term outcomes. Methods The retrospective chart review of patients younger than 18 years diagnosed with a CST between 2004 and 2018 at a single center was carried out. Results We found 16 children with CST with a mean age of 7. 6 years and an average follow-up duration of 29 months. Conclusions Our research is one of the first cohorts to gather CST results for the pediatric CST with the longest follow-up period. On follow-up neuroimaging, we found no statistical difference between clinical variables when comparing patients with full/partial resolution versus those with no resolution of thrombosis.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35306302


Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis and Blindness Complicating Dental Infection.

For two weeks, a 32-year-old man with underlying hypertension developed left eye ptosis and diplopia. He also expressed dissatisfaction with the left eye progressive blurring of vision. Before scheduling tooth extraction, he went to the dental clinic for the toothache and was prescribed oral metronidazole. On examination, his visual acuity was 20/20 on the right and perception was left on the left, with perception on the left being 20/20 on the left. The left eye pupil was sluggish, but relative afferent pupil reflex was positive. Hypoesthesia in the left V1 region was also present. An elevated total white cell count and C- reactive protein was discovered by blood tests, revealing an elevated total white cell count and C-responsive protein. Hence, urgent computed tomography of the brain was requested and found left cavernous sinus thrombosis with diffuse thickening and enhancement that extended anteriorly to the left orbital apex. Through the therapy, he maintained the permanent sequelae of a left blind eye and residual cranial nerve palsies.

Source link: https://europepmc.org/article/MED/35186577

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions