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Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis - DOAJ

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Last Updated: 01 January 2023

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Hypercoagulability and Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis due to Protein C Deficiency. A Case Report.

Thrombophilia due to protein C deficiency is unusual disorder that affects 0. 2% of the general population. Adults with cerebral venous thrombosis have an incidence of 3-4 cases per million. Symptoms: A 51-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with a bilaterally aching frontal headache that was accompanied by vomiting and nausea. The patient returned to the Emergency Department with left periorbital edema, fever, diplopia, and disorientation over the next two weeks. Conclusion: This case study emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of patients with protein C deficiency caused by septic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.5195/ijms.2022.1751


Unique Presentation of Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in the Setting of Reusable Face Covering

To reduce human-to-human transmission of SARS-CoV-2, health officials advised universal masking to help reduce human-to-human transmission of SARS-CoV2. We describe a case of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in an immunocompetent 21-year-old man with resultant infection in the case of persistent reuse of a mask that resulted in bilateral cavernous thrombosis and septic embolism.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/3388537


Lemierre syndrome associated mycotic cavernous sinus thrombosis and carotid aneurysm after COVID-19

The aim of this article is to describe a case of Lemierre syndrome associated mycotic aneurysm of the intracavernous carotid artery leading to cavernous sinus syndrome in an otherwise healthy young man in the environment of COVID-19 disease. Observations: An 18-year-old, ideally healthy male athlete, developed fever, chills, and headaches, and was found to be positive for COVID-19 with gram negative bacteremia. With excellent results, he continued to suffer left internal carotid artery embolization and cervical internal carotid artery sacrifice. Conclusion and importance: Lemierre syndrome can have atypical symptoms and disorders, including cavernous sinus thrombosis and mycotic aneurysms.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajoc.2022.101642


Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by Streptococcus constellatus-associated Lemierre syndrome presenting as an isolated abducens nerve palsy

To discuss a patient with Streptococcus constellatus-related Lemierre syndrome complicated by imminent cavernous sinus thrombosis that appeared as an isolated abducens nerve palsy. Observations: A patient with a history of heavy alcohol use was diagnosed with Lemierre syndrome as a result of an odontogenic infection related to Streptococcus constellatus. Conclusions and Importance: CST is a rare complication of odontogenic disease and Lemierre syndrome, which is extremely rare.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajoc.2020.100592


Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis: case report

Introduction: Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic disease caused by Mucorales fungi, and the Rhizopus is the most common one. Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis, a rare and fatal infectious disease, is one potential intracranial complication of Mucormycosis. The first signs of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis are headaches, retro-orbital pain, periorbital edema, proptosis, diplopia, and reduced vision. After kidney transplantation, we explore the case of a 43-year-old woman with a medical history of diabetes mellitus and the use of immunosuppressant drugs. Patients with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis developed Acute Bacterial Sinusitis and Rhino-orbitocerebral Mucormycosis.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/9fd6160b95c54d3eb5e3c14f8483e822


Panophthalmitis and Orbital Inflammation with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Following Cataract Surgery

Case Report: We investigate the case of a 35-year-old female with severe autism and developmental delay who suffered panophthalmis, orbital inflammation, and cavernous sinus thrombosis six weeks post cataract surgery. We also want to stress that considering the pertinent risk factors associated with developing potential infections following cataract surgery, including the use of corneal sutures, high-risk habits, excessive eye-rubbing, and non-compliance with appointments and post-operative medications.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/4862b5981e724b9cb2d43c342ed2a652


Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. The typical course of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile disease with or without jaundice. The presence of various bodily systems may account for the less common clinical signs. Moreover, leptospirosis without treatment can lead to organ damage and even death. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are connected with a high mortality risk.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/3dbff4bf6a24472e96516280dd177511


Cavernous sinus thrombosis in a COVID-19 patient: A case report

Coronavirus disease 2019 is an emerging pandemic disease caused by a new coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2020.12.013


Massive infarction and cavernous sinus thrombosis

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare and potentially lethal complication following tooth extraction. In the present case of a 55-year-old male suspected of diabetes mellitus, tooth extraction was performed. An examination was carried out and the diagnosis of alveolar absces was confirmed, but no incision or drainage was done. He noticed swelling in the cheeks and left eye on the left side, as well as a scan brain that revealed hyperdense areas in cavernous sinus on the left side and left sylvian fissure in left temporal and frontal lobes. A diagnosis of rhino-orbital infection from a dental source with cavernous sinus extension that left temporo-frontal hemorrhagic venous infarction was performed, but the patient did not respond to the therapy and died as a result of the infection. Early signs such as unilateral facial edema, orbital chemosis, edema, and proptosis can be triggering a high risk of cavernous sinus thrombosis.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/cbcf22f74daa4a9a865b4347bf54a612

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions