Advanced searches left 3/3

Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis - DOAJ

Summarized by Plex Scholar
Last Updated: 16 April 2022

* If you want to update the article please login/register

Odontogenic orbital cellulitis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a case report

Case presentation A 46-year-old white woman came to our emergency room with proptosis, ophthalmoplegia, and conctival chemosis of her left eye. The cavernous sinus thrombosis was confirmed by medical and radiological testing, which also showed septic pulmonary embolism. Streptococcus constellatus, a member of the Peptostreptococcus family, is a saprophyte of the oral mucosa that can be pathogenic in immunocompromized individuals, according to a blood culture. Conclusions This multidisciplinary approach to orbital cellulitis management exemplifies the need for prompt diagnosis and treatment of eye injuries and potential complications in order to avoid severe and permanent sequelae.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-017-1309-0


Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis: case report

Introduction: Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic disease caused by Mucorales fungi, and the Rhizopus is the most common one. The Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis, which is a rare and fatal infectious disease, is one potential intracranial complication of Mucormycosis. The first signs of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis are headache, retro-orbital pain, periorbital edema, proptosis, diplopia, and reduced vision. After kidney transplantation, we discuss the case of a 43-year-old woman with a medical history of diabetes mellitus and the use of immunosuppressant drugs. Patients with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis had Acute Bacterial Sinusitis and Rhino-orbitocerebral Mucormycosis.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/9fd6160b95c54d3eb5e3c14f8483e822


Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by Streptococcus constellatus-associated Lemierre syndrome presenting as an isolated abducens nerve palsy

To illustrate a patient with Streptococcus contellation-associated Lemierre syndrome complicated by possible cavernous sinus thrombosis that resembled as unusual abducens nerve palsy. Observations: A patient with a history of heavy alcohol use was diagnosed with Lemierre syndrome, which was caused by a streptococcus constellatus, causing an odontogenic disease. Conclusions and Importance: CST is a rare complication of odontogenic disease and Lemierre syndrome.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajoc.2020.100592


Meningitis with cranial polyneuritis and cavernous sinus thrombosis by Borrelia crocidurae

B. crocidurae is classified as the most neurotropic agent of TBRF and is linked to a variety of neurological disorders, e. To date, European cases of B. crocidurae infection have been documented in travelers returning from endemic areas. B. crocidurae infection in Europe is the first autochthonous case of meningitis with cranial polyneuritis and cavernous sinus thrombosis that were not related to classic febrile recurrences.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2019.02.028


Massive infarction and cavernous sinus thrombosis

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare and potentially lethal condition following tooth extraction. In the present case of a 55-year-old male suspected of diabetes mellitus underwent tooth extraction. The cheek swelling increased to left eye, right eye, and CT brain was performed, showing hyperdense areas in cavernous sinus on left side and left sylvian fissure in left temporal and frontal lobes. Emergency surgery for decompression was administered but the patient did not respond to the therapy and succumbed to the disease. Early signs of cavernous sinus thrombosis, unilateral facial edema, orbital chemosis, edema, and proptosis may have raised the risk of cavernous sinus thrombosis.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/cbcf22f74daa4a9a865b4347bf54a612


Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease caused by Leptospirose spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. An acute biphasic febrile disease with or without jaundice is the typical presentation of the disease. Less common clinical signs can be related to the presence of several bodily systems. Moreover, leptospirosis without treatment can cause organ damage and even death. Leptospirosis complications and brainstem involvement, as well as a high mortality risk, are rare complications of leptospirosis.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/3dbff4bf6a24472e96516280dd177511


Panophthalmitis and Orbital Inflammation with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Following Cataract Surgery

Articles: We cover the case of a 35-year-old female with severe autism and developmental delay who developed panophthalmitis, orbital inflammation, and cavernous sinus thrombosis six weeks after cataract surgery. We also want to emphasize the importance of investigating the root causes of developing potential infections after cataract surgery, including corneal sutures, high-risk behaviors such as excessive eye-rubbing, and non-compliance with appointments and post-operative medications.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/4862b5981e724b9cb2d43c342ed2a652


Streptococcus group C meningitis with cavernous sinus thrombosis

1 Hilary Enuh,1 Jessie Saverimuttu,1 Jessie Saverimuttu,2 John Nfonoyim31Department of Medicine, 2Division of Infectious Disease, 3Critical Care Unit, Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USAAbstract: Group C Streptococcus is a rare cause of bacteremia in humans. Only a few instances of GCS meningitis have been reported. We describe the first instance of GCS meningitis with cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, and streptococcus group C.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/64ad026f6453425f9dc62bb18d09da52


Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: An Unusual and Fatal Disease

Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare and fatal disease. Clinical presentations in the early stages are nonspecific, and the sensitivity of cranial axial computed tomography with thick section is poor. In patients with septic CST in a medical center in Taiwan, this research examined the clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings. Methods: This retrospective case collection included nine patients with septic CST who had typical signs and clinical course, evidence of disease, and imaging studies that confirmed cavernous sinus lesion, and who were admitted at National Taiwan University Hospital between 1995 and 2003. In all patients, initial cranial images were unable to detect CTS. Conclusion: Fungal CST should be suspected in an immunocompromised patient with ophthalmic complaints that progress from one eye to the other in an immunocompromised patient with high case-fatality incidence and poor yield rate of blood cultures.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0929-6646(09)60306-5


Botulism and cavernous sinus thrombosis induced by Acute rhinosinusitis: A case report

Background: Botulism is an acute and rapidly progressing descending paralytic disease caused by a neurotoxin of clostridium botulinum. Case study: A 28-year-old woman was presented with severe generalized ascending symmetric muscle paralysis. In the paranasal sinus scan, Pansinusitis was discovered. The patient was completely detached from the ventilator on 41st day. Conclusions: Botulism should be a diagnosis in any patient with an acute progressive symmetrical descent paralysis. Botulinum spores can be inoculated with Sinus mucosal injury.

Source link: https://doaj.org/article/22e63fb4dda84a10980b49b4aaf25c9a

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions