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Cauda Equina Syndrome - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 January 2023

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Anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion for acute cauda equina syndrome caused by recurrent disc prolapse: report of 3 cases

There is a lack of evidence and agreement on the right treatment for recurrent disc herniation after posterior discectomy, and no reports have suggested an anterior strategy for cauda equina syndrome. In three cases of patients who underwent anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion for CES related to recurrent disc herniations that had not previously treated with posterior discectomy, the authors explore the causes and outcomes. In all three cases, complete recovery of herniated disc material was achieved without finding significant epidural scar tissue. No perioperative infection or neurological injury occurred, and all three patients' neurological recovery followed, with improved bladder and bowel function as well as reduction in leg and leg pain. Recurrent lumbar disc prolapse, which had not been treated with posterior discectomy, is one of the CES treatments available for CES caused by recurrent lumbar disc prolapse that was previously treated with posterior discectomy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.1.spine16352


Cauda equina syndrome secondary to portal vein thrombosis: case report of favorable outcome with conservative treatment

Epidural varicosis, a rare but well-known cause of cauda equina syndrome, is Epidural varicosis. Although inferior vena cava obstruction is the most common finding in those situations, portal vein hypertension can lead to epidural venous plexus engorgement by means of lumbar portocaval shunt activation. Therefore, a complete diagnostic study was performed and revealed deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and portal vein thrombosis. This is the first report of CES secondary to epidural varicosis in the context of acute portal vein thrombosis and extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, according to the authors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.6.spine20625


Sacral preservation in cauda equina syndrome from inferior vena cava thrombosis

Acute cauda equina syndrome can be triggered by a variety of conditions. Patients with acute paraparesis should have an increasing number of prophylactic and/or therapeutic IVC filters applied in the postoperative period, resulting in an elevated risk of IVC thrombosis in patients presenting with acute paraparesis.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2008.12.spine08389


Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report

This paper details the onset of a cauda equina syndrome patient with ventral displacement of the cauda equina during decompression of Chiari malformation Type I in a patient with a cauda equina syndrome resulting from the birth of a lumbar subcognition condition.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.2.spine151480


What is the incidence of cauda equina syndrome? A systematic review

From three different groups: asymptomatic community populations, patients with nontraumatic low-back pain, and patients with suspected CES incidence were available. In two symptomatic adult populations, 0. 6 percent per year in an asymptomatic adult population, and 7 million per year in an asymptomatic working-age population, the incidence of CES was 0. 33 million per year. In 0. 8 percent of those with low-back pain presenting to primary care in a single study, a combined estimate of 0. 2 percent was calculated for four studies of those with low-back pain presenting to secondary care in a 1 study. 19% had radiological and clinical CES across 18 studies of adults with suspected CES. A consensus clinical and radiological definition of CES and international multisite studies of patient pathways of investigation and management must be required for determining accurate incidence data and implementing a bespoke service for investigation of patients with suspected CES.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2019.12.spine19839


Cauda equina syndrome as a postoperative complication of lumbar spine surgery

Object U201d has been used to describe patients with compressive neuropathy of both lumbar and sacral origins. This syndrome is well-known as an indication for surgical intervention in treating lumbar spine disease in the lumbar spine disease, but it is less common as a postoperative complication following postoperative complications. Both cases of CES that occurred following uneventful lumbar spine surgery were documented in this book, u2014one microdiscectomy, and one decompressive laminectomy. Following a decompressive laminectomy, one patient developed perineal numbness and bowel and bladder difficulties. In the lower extremities, the second patient had progressive numbness and weakness. Conclusions: Parts of a partial or complete CES are a medical emergency, particularly if they are progressive. Surgical investigation is warranted if a mass lesion is demonstrated on imaging studies or if symptoms progress and the disease source is uncertain based on available information.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.2004.16.6.6


Conus medullaris and cauda equina syndrome as a result of traumatic injuries: management principles

Conus medullaris syndrome and cauda equina syndrome are two common medical disorders that can be characterized by a variety of signs. Although patients commonly suffer with acute disc herniation, acute disc herniation, traumatic injury at the thoracolumbar junction at the terminal portion of the spinal cord and cauda equina are also common. In this paper, the authors examine the latest research on traumatic conus medullaris and cauda equina injuries, as well as available treatment options.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.2004.16.6.4


Infectious origins of cauda equina syndrome

Due to spinal infection, there is perhaps no more devastating diagnosis than the neurological consequences of a cauda equina syndrome. A multitude of bacteria and sources can make diagnosis and treatment of spinal infection difficult. Both pyogenic and nonpyogenic organisms can cause vertebral involvement, and can result in an epidural absces with neurological dysfunction.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/foc.2004.16.6.2


Stem cell injections for axial back pain: a systematic review of associated risks and complications with a case illustration of diffuse hyperplastic gliosis resulting in cauda equina syndrome

OBJECTIVE Axial low-back pain is a disease of epidemic proportions that takes a global toll on the active workforce and results in more than half a trillion dollars in annual expenditures. METHODS (MetHODS) An systematic review of the literature was carried out using the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus online electronic databases to find articles describing stem cell injections for axial back pain in accordance with the PRISMA's guidelines. Another case of glial hyperplasia of the cauda equina's roots specifically related to stem cell injections conducted in another country is also reported. Patients were seeking a surgical solution after 6 months to two years, with pain relief patients looking for a surgical solution. CONCLUSIONS There are currently insufficient evidence to back stem cell injections for back pain support stem cell injections.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2019.6.spine19594


DOES TIMELY INTERVENTION DEFINE SURGICAL OUTCOMES IN CAUDA EQUINA SYNDROME

Objectives: Study Design: Objective: To determine func The purpose of study design: Objective: The study of funciton outcomes of patients in cases of cauda equina syndrome is to determine if they are toler equina syndrome. Cauda equina syndrome is a certiferous spinal disorder that necessitates immediate surgical intervention. While early morning presentations by the patient and emergent surgical intervention by the clinician are important in complete and rapid recovery of symptoms, our analysis shows that even though patients were delayed in our outpatient department and surgical intervention was done on an emergency basis, the desired result was obtained in the majority of cases presenting with incomplete CES.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.36106/ijsr/2504630

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions