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Cauda Equina Syndrome - Crossref

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Last Updated: 10 September 2022

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Non-compressive postoperative cauda equina syndrome following decompression and transforaminal interbody fusion surgery

Following lumbar disc surgery, postoperative cauda syndrome is a common complication. Emergent surgical research remains the mainstay of management, although the factors that prompted postop CES remain a variety of compressive factors. We detail our participation in two instances of incomplete CES during our weekly transforaminal interbody fusion, which we followed closely without success, resulting in a positive result. In our cases, the role of conservative oversight of postoperative CES in certain special cases has a positive result.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2018-227219


Anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion for acute cauda equina syndrome caused by recurrent disc prolapse: report of 3 cases

There is a lack of details and agreement on the right therapy for recurrent disc herniation after posterior discectomy, and no studies have detailed an anterior strategy for cauda equina syndrome. In three cases of patients who underwent anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion for CES caused by persistent disc herniation that had not previously been treated with posterior discectomy, the authors describe the treatment and results. In all three cases, complete retrieval of herniated disc material was achieved without experiencing significant epidural scar tissue. No perioperative infection or neurological injury occurred, and all three patients' neurological recovery included bladder and bowel function enhancement as well as leg pain relief, which was apparent. CES caused by recurrent lumbar disc prolapse that had previously been treated with posterior discectomy is one alternative to address CES caused by posterior discectomy.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2017.1.spine16352


Stem cell injections for axial back pain: a systematic review of associated risks and complications with a case illustration of diffuse hyperplastic gliosis resulting in cauda equina syndrome

OBJECTIVE Axial low-back pain is a disease of epidemic proportions that takes a heavy global toll on the active population and results in more than a trillion dollars in annual costs. The authors present a case of a severe complication following a stem cell injection for back pain as well as a comprehensive review of the evidence supporting this therapy, as well as the associated risks and complications. METHODS The search was carried out by a systematic review of the literature using the PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus online electronic databases to find articles identifying stem cell injections for axial back pain in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. A case of glial hyperplasia of the cauda equina's roots that are directly related to stem cell injections performed in another region has also been reported. CONCLUSIONS There are already insufficient results to back stem cell injections for back pain, but back pain stem cell injections are still insufficient.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2019.6.spine19594


What is the incidence of cauda equina syndrome? A systematic review

CES incidence data was available from three different populations: asymptomatic community populations, patients with nontraumatic low-back pain, and patients with a medical emergency with suspected CES. In two asymptomatic adult populations, 0. 6 per 100,000 per year, 0. 6 percent per year, and 7 percent per year in an asymptomatic working-age population, the incidence of CES hit 0. 3 percent per 100,000 per year. In 0. 8 percent of those with low-back pain presenting to primary care in a study, a cumulative estimate of 0. 2 percent was obtained for four studies of those with low-back pain presenting to secondary care in a 1 study. 19% of adults with suspected CES had radiological and clinical CES, according to 18 studies. A consensus clinical and radiological definition of CES and international multisite studies of patient pathways of investigation and management of suspected CES are vital in determining accurate incidence rates and designing a custom solution for monitoring patients with suspected CES.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2019.12.spine19839


Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report

Although there are a few cases of intracranial subdural hygroma after surgery for CM-I, often due to a pinhole opening in the arachnoid, the authors' understanding hasn't been determined.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2016.2.spine151480


Sacral preservation in cauda equina syndrome from inferior vena cava thrombosis

Acute cauda equina syndrome can be triggered by a variety of conditions. Patients with acute paraparesis may have an elevated risk of IVC thrombosis in patients receiving prophylactic and/or therapeutic IVC filters in the perioperative period.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2008.12.spine08389


Cauda equina syndrome a rare early surgical complication in a pediatric patient with dysplastic high-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: A case report

Drop foot is the most common medical disorder reported in the literature. Only one patient with cauda equina syndrome after surgery for dysplastic high-grade spondylolisthesis was present in the Scoliosis Research Society website, according to the Scoliosis Research Society website, with only one patient suffering cauda equina syndrome following surgery for dysplastic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. After an in situ arthrodesis for lumbosacral spondylolisthesis, there has been another study of 12 cauda equina syndrome cases. After a modest improvement of dysplastic high-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis in a child, the new study is the first case in the literature of cauda equina syndrome. After implant removal and sacral dome resection, bilateral anal compound muscle reaction potential is seen. Both rectal and external bladder sphincters in children with high-grade lumbosacral dysplastic spondylolisthesis undergoing surgical reduction are essential to prevent a devastating neurological disorder. The Sacral dome resection and appropriate L5-S1 discectomy have avoided stretching of the cauda equina over the sacrum's posterosuperior border postoperatively.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.25259/jmsr_77_2022


Cauda equina syndrome secondary to portal vein thrombosis: case report of favorable outcome with conservative treatment

Although inferior vena cava obstruction is the most common finding in such situations, portal vein hypertension can lead to epidural venous plexus engorgement by means of lumbar portocaval shunt activation. Hence, a complete diagnostic study was done, revealing deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and portal vein thrombosis. This is the first report of CES secondary to epidural varicosis in the context of acute portal vein thrombosis and extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, according to the authors.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3171/2020.7.spine20625


Cauda Equina Syndrome

Cauda equine syndrome, a group of nerves in the lumbosacral spine that provide motor and sensory stimulation to the majority of the lower extremities, pelvic floor musculature, and sphincters are related to compression or injury to the cauda equine. The most common cause of cauda equine syndrome is a midline herniated disc. The most appropriate clinical therapy appears to be operating on cauda equine patients at the earliest opportunity.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1093/med/9780190887773.003.0018

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions