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Last Updated: 11 January 2023

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Discarded Cathode Ray Tube Glass as an Alternative for Aggregate in a Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer

Cathode Ray Tube glass is one of a number of hazardous metals wastes that are impossible to recycle due to their hazardous metals content. However, according to results, CRT glass content has no apparent effect on flexural or compressive strength. Summarizing the second part of the study, it was determined that the following parameters are optimal from the mechanical, economic, and environmental standpoints: metakaolin to CRT glass ratio 1:1, CRT glass ratio 1:1, curing at the room temperature, sodium hydroxide concentration 10 mol/L.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020479


Properties of Cement-Based Materials Containing Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) Glass Waste as Fine Aggregates—A Review

This research will act as a catalyst for the use of CRT glass waste in concrete mixtures. A total of 61 papers from literature were reviewed, with emphasis on the latest, mechanical, and long life of cement-based materials containing CRT glass waste as fine aggregates. The majority of the studies found that replacing sand with CRT glass waste increased the consistency, although the low permeability of the CRT glass caused this phenomenon. In addition, several research have suggested approaches to reduce lead leaching inherent with the lead glass's lead leaching. In general, it was found that CRT glass waste could be a viable component of the manufacture of renewable cement-based materials, particularly for radiation shielding applications.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011529


Waste-to-Reuse Foam Glasses Produced from Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass, Cathode Ray Tube Glass, and Aluminium Dross

Aluminium dross is a volatile industrial waste produced during aluminium production. Dross has been used in a variety of areas of study as a secondary raw material source for alumina, clinker, cement, or glass-ceramic manufacturing, but only a few papers emphasize on the use of dross as a foaming agent for foams. Even more studies have been published where dross was used as a basic component of foam glasses, and even less has been done. Foam glasses were made entirely from waste materials: aluminum dross, container glass, and cathode ray tube glass. Several specifics are found in the study, e. g. , mixing two industrial waste products and adding an increased amount from the garbage. Special emphasis was placed on the effect of the foam glass components on the microstructure, density, thermal conductivity, and compressive strength.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics10010001


Lead leaching behaviors during panel-funnel glass waste separation from cathode-ray tube glass using thermosol, acid etching or mechanical cutting methods

Hence, a research into the disposal of CRT glass and the potential risk of lead leaching is required. Lead leaching of 133. 34 mg/L from CRT glass in the leaching solution at pH 4. 93 can be accelerated by a glass size of 2u201310 mesh, a rotary shaking speed of 240 rpm, and a retention time of 120 h. This report discusses panel-funnel glass separation and lead leaching from CRT glass, which can be highly useful for CRT glass recycling, processing, and recycling.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jscs.2022.101557


Green Conversion of the Hazardous Cathode Ray Tube and Red Mud into Radiation Shielding Concrete

The use of these hazardous industrial products enhances the longevity and performance of the radiation shielding concrete. Five concrete blocks were cast and tested for their density, compressive strength, gamma shielding techniques, radiation absorption ratio, and transmission coefficient were investigated. paraphrased glass glass, as the increase in red mud and cathode ray tube glass increased, the shielding results of the new concretes would be enhanced. The LAC results found that the new concretes' shielding results would be much improved with the increase in red mud and cathode ray tube glass. At 0. 06 MeV, the transmission factor for the prepared concretes with a thickness of 2 cm varied from 11. 9 percent to 31 percent, while concrete thicknesses varied between 49% and 43 percent at 0. 06 MeV, with a variation of 412 percent at 11. 9 percent. At low energy, the absorption ratio for the ready concretes is high at low energy, meaning that these new composites will capture the majority of the low-energy photons. RAR findings show that the rise in CRTs in the latest composites enhanced the radiation shielding capabilities, as well as increased attenuation, as the CRT glass is at a maximum.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15155316


Investigation on elastic properties and radiation shielding of lead-recycled cathode ray tube glass system

Lead-recycled cathode glass was tested for some reduction in the use of hazardous lead oxide glass by partial replacement using CRT glass waste, as well as partial replacement using CRT glass waste. The elastic properties of lead-recycled glass were determined by the pulse-echo ultrasonic method, and it was discovered that the elastic properties of the glass varied with CRT content. The addition of CRT glass was found to deteriorate lead glass's radiation shielding properties.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.14456/sjst-psu.2020.94


Structural Performance of Reinforced Concrete Beams Incorporating Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT) Glass Waste

The results of reinforced concrete beams in the presence of cathode-ray tube glass waste are investigated. As partial replacement of sand, Four concrete mixes with 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% CRT glass waste were made. The three-point bending test was conducted on reinforced concrete beams with different amounts of CRT glass. Concrete reinforced with CRT glass showed an increase in compressive strength, flexural durability, and modulus of elasticity, particularly at the 10% replacement rate. When 10% of sand is replaced with CRT glass, the load carrying capacity of reinforced concrete beam is higher relative to the control beam and the beams with 20% and 30% CRT glass substitutions. The failure mode of the reinforced concrete beams is flexural failure, and the failure pattern for both beams is similar. The Strain cast iron gave a higher ductility at the control beam, where the deflection was higher than the other beams at the same load.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11020067


Chemical–Electrochemical Process Concept for Lead Recovery from Waste Cathode Ray Tube Glass

This paper introduces a novel method for lead recovery from waste cathode tube glass by using a combination chemical-electrochemical process that allows simultaneous recovery of Pb from waste CRT glass and electrochemical reconditioning of the leaching agent. The resulting recovery process does not only result in complete lead recovery, but it is also environmentally friendly. The General Effect Indices, which were gathered by the Biwer Heinzle method for the input and output streams of the process, show that the developed recovery process does not only result in lead recovery but that it is eco-friendly as well.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14061546


Potential use of spherical glass sourced from cathode ray tube funnel glass for the application as coarse aggregate in concrete

If the hazardous lead leached to the surroundings, managing discarded waste cathode ray tube funnel glass has become a major concern around the world. However, the crushing process has resulted in micro-cracks in the funnel glass bottles, contributing to the high lead leaching rate. Lead leaching has been found in the spherical CRT glass manufacture, on the other hand, recycling the CRT funnel glass waste produced by melting and annealing operations has not pose a threat to the environment. The effect of silica fume content and CRT concrete strength exposed to high temperatures was determined given the importance of materials and exposure. The CRT concrete made with 20% GS and 10% silica fume has similar properties as the control, with the control's 52 MPa being only 7% lower than control concrete.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.6180/jase.202206_25(3).0010


Characteristics of Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer with Cathode Ray Tube Glass

This paper explores the possibility of applying used cathode ray tube glass inside a metakaolin-based geopolymer in the form of an aggregate, providing an environmentally friendly way to recycle this hazardous material. The results indicated that neither the CRT glass content nor the curing process had a major influence on the mechanical behavior of the mice. However, the strength of the geopolymer with a 50% CRT glass by mass increased with time, relative to a geopolymer with a higher CRT glass content. Following the encapsulation of CRT glass within the geopolymer, the concentration of toxic metals in an aqueous extract decreased drastically. The present findings show that the salvaged CRT glass can be used as an aggregate for a metakaolin-based geopolymer. The latest product is rated for high strength and makes the CRT glass safe for the environment.

Source link: https://doi.org/10.3390/polym13071149

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions

* Please keep in mind that all text is summarized by machine, we do not bear any responsibility, and you should always check original source before taking any actions